Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm fairly new with OCaml Module and I haven't managed to use my own module without combining both an "include" and an "open". I've tried to put the signature in a separate .mli file, without success.

Below I'm indicated a minimum (not) working example, that I'm trying to compile with

ocamlc -o main Robot.ml main.ml

What to I need to do to only have to use "open", or only "include", but not both of them ?


File "Robot.ml" :

module type RobotSignature =
sig 
   val top: unit -> unit
end

module Robot =
struct
   let top () = 
      begin
         Printf.printf "top\n"
      end
   (* Should not be visible from the 'main' *)
   let dummy () = 
      begin
         Printf.printf "dummy\n"
      end
end

File "main.ml" (not working) :

open Robot;;

top();

File "main.ml" (working) :

include Robot;;
open Robot;;

top();
share|improve this question
    
I think you have answers to your questions. You may also want to read about compilation units. But please once you have understood what open does. Don't use it, it makes it needlesly harder to understand your code. –  Daniel Bünzli Apr 3 '12 at 17:57
    
Well I would normally agree but in that case the objective is to provide a simple "robot library" to teach basic programming to beginners (in particular, but not limited to OCaml). So I would prefer to avoid the Robot.top() syntax, as much as possible. –  Loïc Février Apr 3 '12 at 18:09
    
Well I think it would actually make it much more understable for beginners to render the object they are acting upon explicit. Anyway you may also want to have a look at the documentation of of open and include. –  Daniel Bünzli Apr 3 '12 at 18:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You've got two levels of Robot. Since you explicitly called your module "Robot" within the file robot.ml you'll need to open Robot and then call Robot.top(). Anything in the robot.ml file is already put implicitly inside of a Robot module.

You could get rid of the extra 'module Robot' declaration in robot.ml.

robot.ml would become:

module type RobotSignature =
sig 
   val top: unit -> unit
end


let top () = 
   begin
       Printf.printf "top\n"
   end

Then it should work as you have it in your main.ml.

Update based on comment below: If you're concerned that everything in robot.ml will now be visible when you 'open Robot' you can define a robot.mli file which specifies the functions which are available externally. For example, let's say you add a function called helper in robot.ml:

let top () =
  begin
     Printf.printf "top\n"
  end

let helper () =
  Printf.printf "helper\n"

...and then you define your robot.mli as follows:

val top: unit -> unit

Then let's say you try to call helper from main.ml:

open Robot;;

top();
(* helper will not be visible here and you'll get a compile error*)
helper ()

Then when you try to compile you'll get an error:

$ ocamlc -o main robot.mli robot.ml main.ml
File "main.ml", line 4, characters 0-6:
Error: Unbound value helper
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed but now the signature has not effect as everything is visible from the main. I understood the "two levels of Robot" but had no idea how to fix it while maintaining a useful signature. –  Loïc Février Apr 3 '12 at 17:06
    
If you want to ensure that only that within the Robot module is visible within main, then define a robot.mli file which only exports what you want exported (I'll edit my response above to show this). –  aneccodeal Apr 3 '12 at 17:10

You have two ways to do this:

  • First, you can constrain your sub-structure to be of the right signature:

    module Robot : RobotSignature = struct ... end
    

    Then in main.ml, you can do open Robot.Robot: the first Robot means the compilation unit associated to robot.ml, the second Robot is the submodule you have defined inside robot.ml

  • You can also remove one level and create robot.mli containing:

    val top: unit -> unit
    

    and robot.ml containing:

    let top () = 
      Printf.printf "top\n"
    
    (* Should not be visible from the 'main' *)
    let dummy () = 
      Printf.printf "dummy\n"
    

    You can compile the modules using ocamlc -c robot.mli && ocamlc -c robot.ml and then in main.ml simply use open Robot.

share|improve this answer
    
Or better don't open Robot but call Robot.top (). –  Daniel Bünzli Apr 3 '12 at 17:59
    
and if '''Robot.Robot.top''' is too long for frequent usage, write '''let module R = Robot.Robot in R.top''' –  lambdapower Apr 3 '12 at 20:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.