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Suppose you have a simple class like this:

class foo{
private:
    int* mData;
    int  mSize;
public:
    foo(int size){
        mSize = size;
        mData = new int [mSize];
    }
    ~foo() {
        mSize = 0;
        delete [] mData;
    }
};

Then inside main you do:

int main () {
    static int HUGE = 100000000;
    foo a(HUGE);
    // do something useful with a
    // .
    // .
    // .
    // Now I'm done with a; I do not need it anymore ...
    foo b(HUGE);
    // do something useful with b
    // Ok we are done with b
    return 0;
}

As you can see a is no longer needed after b, but since it is created on the stack, the destructor won't be called up until the end of the program. Now, I know this is not the same as allocating with new and forgetting to call delete, however this is still wasting memory. Do you consider this as "memory leak" or just a bad programming?

Also, How would you avoid situations like this? One way would be to manually call the destructor when the object is not needed anymore, but, besides looking ugly and unfamiliar!, you get into trouble of double free unless you change the destructor to something like:

foo::~foo(){
    if (mData != NULL){
        delete [] mData;
        mData = NULL;
        mSize = 0;
    }
}

Another way is to create a on the heap via foo *pa = new foo (HUGE) and then call delete pa once the object is no longer needed. This works but at the danger of introducing another possible memory leak (if one forgets to call delete pa).

Is there any better way to get rid of unneeded objects?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't think this is a particularly constructive question. It all comes down to defining what "memory leak" means. You clearly know what's happening, and whether you call that "memory leak", "bad programming", or whatever, doesn't really change much. Oh, and std::vector does what your class tries to, but does it right... –  Jerry Coffin Apr 3 '12 at 16:54
2  
"manually call the destructor". Even with your workaround, that invokes undefined behavior. One must never call the destructor twice on the same object. –  Robᵩ Apr 3 '12 at 16:56
    
@Robᵩ Can you please explain why calling the destructor invokes undefined behavior? –  GradGuy Apr 3 '12 at 18:31
    
You must not refer to an object after the end of its lifetime. The first (direct) call to the destructor ends the lifetime of the object. The second (implicit) call operates on a no-longer-existing object. Quoting the 2003 standard, §3.8/8: "If a program ends the lifetime of an object … with automatic storage duration … the program must ensure that an object of the original type occupies that same storage location when the implicit destructor call takes place." You don't seem to be creating a new object in that location, so the 2nd call to ~foo is undefined. –  Robᵩ Apr 3 '12 at 18:50
    
@GradGuy: Because a is automatically allocated ("on the stack"). This means the compiler is going to call the destructor, like it or not, at the end of the scope. But if you've already called it manually, the end-of-scope call is calling the destructor twice, which is UB. –  GManNickG Apr 3 '12 at 18:53

10 Answers 10

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Destructors are called when an object goes out of scope. C++ allows arbitrary scopes inside function bodies. Write your main function this way:

int main () {
    static int HUGE = 100000000;

    {
        foo a(HUGE);
        // do something useful with a
        // Now I'm done with a; I do not need it anymore ...
    }

    {
        foo b(HUGE);
        // do something useful with b
        // Ok we are done with b
    }
    // etc.
    return 0;
}

I see your example is simplified, but in a real program, don't forget to either

  • implement an appropriate copy constructor and operator= for foo or
  • add a declaration for a private copy constructor and operator= so it cannot be called.
share|improve this answer
    
Bah, you type faster than me :) –  Michael Dorgan Apr 3 '12 at 16:56
    
nice tip about the private copy constructor and operator = :) –  GradGuy Apr 3 '12 at 18:33

Just place your huge a and b objects into their own braces if you are worried about scope.

And this isn't technically a memory leak, but it is very poor memory management as you have stated.


{
  {
    foo a(HUGE);
  }
  ...

  {
    foo b(HUGE);
  }
share|improve this answer

No, it's definetely not a memory leak.

A memory leak is when you allocate memory and you lose its handle, so you can't free it afterwards. It doesn't matter where or when you free the memory, as long as you do.

You could add an enclosing scope to force memory freeing:

{
    foo a(HUGE);
}
{
    foo b(HUGE);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think memory leak is about handle. It is about reduction of available memory. –  Dennis Cheung Apr 3 '12 at 17:41
    
@DennisCheung since the standard says nothing about memory leak or provides a clear definition, wikipedia will have to do - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_leak –  Luchian Grigore Apr 3 '12 at 17:44

This is not a memory leak, because you don't loose track of your allocated memory. However this is slightly ineffective, especially when the program is running longer, and should be avoided.

You can use scopes to shorten the lifetime of an object:

int main () {
    static int HUGE = 100000000;
    {
        foo a(HUGE);
        // do something useful with a
        // .
        // .
        // .
        // Now I'm done with a; I do not need it anymore ...
    }
    {
        foo b(HUGE);
        // do something useful with b
        // Ok we are done with b
    }
    return 0;
}

Also, it is worth reconsidering if this two parts of code should be in separate functions, then the allocated objects will be freed when returning from function.

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The constructor of the class could also take a block of memory you allocated in your 'main()' function as a parameter. That way, once 'a' is done with the use of the memory block, you can pass it into 'b' as well. 'foo' destructor does not need to release any memory at all, and you don't need to be worried about wasting memory, or object lifetimes at all.

share|improve this answer

Do you consider this as "memory leak" or just a bad programming?

No, it is not memory leak.

How would you avoid situations like this?

Write small functions, few lines. Your code will be more readable and the unused variable allocated on the stack will be freed.

share|improve this answer

It's not a memory leak; however it precisely the sort of memory usage that Firefox developers have spent a long time fixing.

Scope is probably the easiest way to fix this, as Dark Falcon suggests. Alternatively move the allocations and related code into separate functions.

Also pointers can be more safely handled with std::auto_ptr so that they are freed when the scope is released.

share|improve this answer

Do you consider this as "memory leak"

No, unless you do something like longjmp in the middle.

or just a bad programming?

I consider using new[] to allocate array in your class bad programming practice, because you have std::vector for that.

Also, How would you avoid situations like this?

Enclose foo into scope:

{
    foo a(HUGE);
}

unless you change the destructor to something like:

delete ignores null pointers. Destructor is called only once, so no need to zero variables. Calling destructor manually is a VERY BAD IDEA - it isn't meant for that. If you want to reinitialize the structure, implement clear() or resize() methods.

Is there any better way to get rid of unneeded objects?

Yes, enclose them into scopes.

share|improve this answer

It's not a memory leak, but if you have a variable that you need the first half of a function, and not the second, there's a good chance that the function is doing to much, and should be refactored into two (or more) separate functions.

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Extract functions to reduce the scope. Give them good names:

void do_a(int amount)
{
    foo a(amount);
    // ask `a` to be useful
}

void do_b(int amount)
{
    foo b(amount);
    // ask `b` to be useful
}

int main () {
    static int HUGE = 100000000;

    do_a(HUGE);
    do_b(HUGE);

    return 0;
}
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