Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

as we all know declaration of array is pretty simple

type name[size];

but when I compile my C++ as CLI/Winform It doesn't work, I've found the following on MSDN which explains this new syntex, but for some reasone I still get strange errors.

When I declared the array the following way, it's compiled with no problems,but when ever the array is manipulated the program crash. (I tested it on a simple program with a button, still the same)

array<int>^ aiArray; //declaration - no problem
aiArray[0] = 5; //after executing it the program crash

Here is the error i get after the crash:

An unhandled exception of type 'System.NullReferenceException' occurred in test.exe
Additional information: Object reference not set to an instance of an object.
share|improve this question
2  
At the risk of stating the obvious, you need an instance of array<int>, not just a variable declaration. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/kewsb8ba(v=vs.80).aspx –  Robert Harvey Apr 3 '12 at 17:18
    
I haven't verified, but you could probably declare the variable with array<int> aiArray(size);. The ^ character denotes a managed reference, essentially a pointer to a .NET object. So your problematic code is roughly equivalent to int* aiArray; aiArray[0] = 5; –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Apr 3 '12 at 20:48
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to create the array, not just declare a local variable. Try this:

array<int>^ aiArray;
aiArray = gcnew array<int>(10);
aiArray[0] = 5;

If you're familiar with C#, this should look familiar. If you're familiar with C++ and not C#, here's what's going on: What you have is roughly equivalent to int* aiArray; in unmanaged C++. You would need to do aiArray = new int[10]; before you can use the unmanaged array.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.