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This a question that is more on the lines of server efficiency and availability.

Say I have a php page that calls a AJAX script and 1 million users are connecting within the same second.

Would there be a performance boost if I limit the AJAX script so that it only echos once instead of every time it receives data?

I planned on printing all the data to a variable and then echoing that variable once the script is finished.

I'm not sure if echoing is simply storing the data in the server until the script finishes, similar to what I want to do above or if it is actually connecting with the client each time?

If a connection is made for each echo then that would be better than filling a variable with data, possibly causing the RAM to fill up fast?

This AJAX script is pulling data from a database (calls PHP page). I have a lot of "echo" statements that are simply printing table, div, tr, etc tags and then finally the data from the database. Then, once again printing table, div, tr, etc tags. Your saying that it's better to simply fill a variable with this data and print/echo ONCE?

Thanks,

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Your question is vague to me. It would help if you could clarify (maybe an example). –  Ako Apr 3 '12 at 17:37
    
What you are trying to explain is about CACHING results, right? –  mrsafraz Apr 3 '12 at 17:39
    
@mrsafraz I want to either store all the data in a variable and then send using one echo statement or use an echo statement everytime I want to send something out such as tables, divs, text, etc. Which one is better when it comes to AJAX calling a PHP page? –  Marc Brown Apr 4 '12 at 15:04
    
I get it. I have posted an answer. In this case, my answer would be - there won't be a performance difference in both ways. You can do it the way that is convenient for you. If you consider about performance, then you can cache your results in browsers. –  mrsafraz Apr 6 '12 at 5:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Generally, servers processes scripts and sends the output in the form of HTML, so there is no longer link between a page and server. When you are making a AJAX request, you will open the connection again and send the request.

The main bottleneck in the performance occurs from the amount of request you send to the server. You should limit the request as much as possible.

If a connection is made for each echo then that would be better than filling a variable with data, possibly causing the RAM to fill up fast.

You are wrong about this, You should minimize the request as much as possible, especially, when you are processing a large number of people.


Next, Its nearly pointless to update the content onevery pass. Look how facebook updates its content. The timers and contents are updated every minute. Except the notification part.

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If keep-alive is enabled on the server, can an AJAX call reuse an existing connection ? –  Pierre-Olivier Bourgeois Apr 3 '12 at 17:40
    
@Pierre-OlivierBourgeois, The Apache KeepAlive directive specifies that TCP/IP connections from clients to the Apache server are to be kept 'alive' for a given duration specified by the value of KeepAliveTimeout. So its only usefull when you are processing a heavy request. –  Starx Apr 3 '12 at 17:47
    
@Starx Here's a little more detail. This AJAX script is pulling data from a database (calls PHP page). I have a lot of "echo" statements that are simply printing table, div, tr, etc tags and then finally the data from the database. Then, once again echoing table, div, tr, etc tags back to the ajax script. Your saying that it's better to simply fill a variable with this data and print/echo ONCE to the waiting AJAX script? Thanks, –  Marc Brown Apr 3 '12 at 21:37

"I'm not sure if echoing is simply storing the data in the server until the script finishes, similar to what I want to do above or if it is actually connecting with the client each time?"

If you use output buffering, then the output data is stored in the output buffer and sent to the browser as a whole data. e.g: your output size is 10kb, and the complete 10kb data is sent when finished echoing.

Or else the output is sent in certain amount of output size intervals, depending on your PHP configuration settings. e.g: your output data size has a total of 10kb and the output is sent when 2kb, 4kb, 6kb, 8kb and 10kb data is reached.

but,

it is NOT connecting with the client each time

And sometimes, it also depends on browsers. Different browsers handle it in different ways.

If you consider about performance, you might also look at caching your ajax results

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