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I'm trying to check if server-running-p is available in my .emacs file before calling it. I already have the following:

(if (not (server-running-p))
    (server-start))

But on some computers where I use Emacs, calling (server-running-p) gives an error because said call is not available. So I want to check if server-running-p is available before calling it. I thought boundp would do the try, but calling (boundp 'server-running-p) return nil even though the (server-running-p) call succeeds. What's the right way to check that calling server-running-p won't fail... or at least to suppress the error if said call fails. (And what kind of weird object is server-running-p anyway that boundp returns nil, but calling it succeeds?)

This is on Emacs 23.2.1, if it makes any difference.


Actually found the answer. You have to use fboundp for this instead of boundp, for some reason.

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3  
The reason is that you can have a function and a variable with the same name (e.g. font-lock-mode). Hence you need different functions to ask "Is this a variable?" and "Is this a function?" –  cjm Apr 3 '12 at 19:30
    
Thanks. I had completely forgotten about that particularity of some Lisp languages. Makes more sense now. –  Christian Hudon Apr 4 '12 at 20:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

boundp checks to see if a variable is bound. Since server-running-p is a function you'll want to use fboundp. Like so:

(if (and (fboundp 'server-running-p) 
         (not (server-running-p)))
   (server-start))
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A simpler way is to use "require" to make sure the server code is loaded. Here's what I use:

(require 'server)
(unless (server-running-p)
    (server-start))
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2  
I am also trying to keep my .emacs compatible with both Emacs and XEmacs. In that case, using fbounpd seems safer to me, no? –  Christian Hudon Jul 4 '12 at 21:32

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