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I need to transfer UUIDs from a C++ code to a C code that will be running on Intel 8051 based dongle. I have defined the following struct to represent UUID in a most portable way:

struct UUID {
    unsigned char data1[4];
    unsigned char data2[2];
    unsigned char data3[2];
    unsigned char data4[8];
};

Well, this struct of byte arrays is not very convenient to work with in C++, so I defined an intermediate helper class as follows:

#include <stdint.h> // #include <cstdint> in C++0x

class UUIDAssign {
public:
    uint32_t data1;
    uint16_t data2;
    uint16_t data3;
    uint64_t data4;

    operator UUID() const
    {
        UUID uuid(*((UUID*)this));
        return uuid;
    }    
};

This way I am able to write something like:

UUIDAssign assign1 = {0x80DFDD28, 0xF033, 0xB027, 0xCDD2078FC78A};
UUID uuid1 = assign1;

I don't see another way to conveniently initialize the UUID struct with some value. Well, initializing it from the string representation is IMHO a questionable option.

The questions are:

  1. Do the way I implemented the initialization of UUID via intermediate helper class is incorrect? May you please provide me with some suggestions?
  2. What about padding? Can it affect the data transferred to UUID from UUIDAssign?
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2 Answers 2

Union is your friend:

#ifdef __CPLUSPLUS
    #include <cstdint>
    #include <cstdio>
#else
    #include <stdint.h>
    #include <stdio.h>
#endif

union UUID {
    struct {
        uint32_t data1;
        uint16_t data2;
        uint16_t data3;
        uint64_t data4;
    } cpp;
    struct {
        unsigned char data1[4];
        unsigned char data2[2];
        unsigned char data3[2];
        unsigned char data4[8];
    } c;
};

int main() {
    UUID uuid = {0x80DFDD28, 0xF033, 0xB027, 0xCDD2078FC78A};

    printf("%u\n%x%x%x%x\n", uuid.cpp.data1, uuid.c.data1[3], uuid.c.data1[2], uuid.c.data1[1], uuid.c.data1[0]);

    return 0;
}

which outputs (on little-endian, note the reverse printing of the second value):

2162154792
80dfdd28

Order in which you have to access the "c" sub-structure is machine-dependent.

share|improve this answer

In principle you could get problems with padding/alignment, but given the types the the order you used them in, that's quite unlikely. You are more likely to get problems with different endianness on different platforms.

Apart from that, the code you wrote violates the strict aliasing rules of C++. While your UUID type contains only char arrays, it is not a char array. Therefore you cannot completely exclude the possibility of the optimizer making problems (in the form of silently wrong code).

If you do not need to have your UUID class to be POD, the simplest solution would be a constructor for UUID like this:

struct UUID {
    unsigned char data1[4];
    unsigned char data2[2];
    unsigned char data3[2];
    unsigned char data4[8];
    UUID(uint32_t d1, uint16_t d2, uint16_t d3, uint64_t d4)
    {
      data1[0] = d4 & 0xff;
      data1[1] = (d4 >> 8) & 0xff;
      data1[2] = (d4 >> 16) & 0xff;
      data1[3] = d4 >> 24;
      // etc.
    }
};

Then you could define your UUID object as

UUID uuid(0x80DFDD28, 0xF033, 0xB027, 0xCDD2078FC78A);

If your UUID object needs to be POD, you can do it like this:

struct UUID {
    unsigned char data1[4];
    unsigned char data2[2];
    unsigned char data3[2];
    unsigned char data4[8];
};

struct UUIDAssign: UUID
{
    UUIDAssign(uint32_t d1, uint16_t d2, uint16_t d3, uint64_t d4)
    {
      data1[0] = d4 & 0xff;
      data1[1] = (d4 >> 8) & 0xff;
      data1[2] = (d4 >> 16) & 0xff;
      data1[3] = d4 >> 24;
      // etc.
    }
};

and initialize like this:

UUID uuid = UUIDAssign(0x80DFDD28, 0xF033, 0xB027, 0xCDD2078FC78A);
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't it be UUID * uuid = new UUIDAssign(/**/)? –  Artur Czajka Apr 3 '12 at 19:47
    
@ArturCzajka: No, there's absolutely no reason to use dynamic allocation here. The automatically generated copy constructor will copy the UUID part of the UUIDAssign object (i.e. the part which contains all the data) just fine. Indeed, it will most probably be optimized out, writing the data directly into the UUID object. –  celtschk Apr 3 '12 at 19:52

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