Linked Questions

10
votes
2answers
459 views

C++ const correctness with string literals [duplicate]

According to the C++ standard a string literal type is array of const char auto constStr = "aaa"; char* nonConstStr = constStr; //Error here, cannot convert from 'const char *' to 'char *' char* ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

why can I assign a string literals to a char* pointer [duplicate]

I think the string literals in c++ is the type of const char*. And you can't assign const char* object to a non-constant char* object. But in Visual studio 2010. The following code can compile without ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

Where and How are Character array literals created? [duplicate]

I have been experimenting on strings in c. Here in this piece of code. #include<stdio.h> int main() { char *arr="output"; *arr='s'; printf("%s",arr); return 0; } Where in memory ...
2
votes
3answers
104 views

C strings declarations [duplicate]

I'm learning C and today I stuck with the "strings" in C. Basically I understand that there is no such thing like string in C. In C strings are an array characters terminated with \0 at the end. So ...
5
votes
4answers
712 views

Compile Time Error vs Run Time Error

I am confused why compiler gives const char s[]="hello"; s[2]='t'; // Compile Time Error char *t = "hello"; *(t+2)='u'; // Run time Error I guess in both case the ...
6
votes
2answers
266 views

Where will the memory allocation for a string in C will take place

For the C statement given below i would like to know where the memmory allocation will take place. char* ptr="Hello";//ptr is a automatic variable then the pointer variable ptr will be allocated on ...
3
votes
6answers
174 views

C fundamentals - Having problems with variables and pointers

I’m having some problems learning C and I really have no where else to turn for advice. I come from a list of OOP languages such as JavaScript and mainly Python, so C is a major change and I’m hitting ...
3
votes
3answers
581 views

character pointer

Why this code does not work? int main(){ char *str ="abcde"; scanf("%s",str); printf("%s",str); } but this works? int main(){ char str[] ="abcde"; scanf("%s",str); printf("%s",str); ...
1
vote
4answers
121 views

Creating array of character pointers and integer pointers

char *x[4] = { "ffg", "fgf", "kkk" "mmm"}; int *x1[4] = { 1, 2 ,3 , 4}; If I create array of character pointers as mentioned above its compiling fine whereas if I create array of integer pointers as ...
3
votes
5answers
930 views

initializing char pointer as string vs other type pointers as arrays

I've got a question about initializing char pointers vs other data type pointers. Specifically, we are allowed to initialize char pointers as follows: char *char_ptr = "Hello World"; As far as I ...
5
votes
2answers
672 views

Why char *s = “hello”; is allowed?

char *s = "hello"; The code above allocates 6 bytes in read-only section of a program (I've forgot the name of the section) to store the string hello. Then, s is initialized to point to the first ...
4
votes
5answers
140 views

How do I fix this code to create an array of strings?

I want to create an array of strings. Here is the code: #include <stdio.h> int main(void){ char str1[] = {'f','i'}; char str2[] = {'s','e'}; char str3[] = {'t','h'}; char ...
2
votes
5answers
559 views

Where does #define or char* strings reside in memory? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is a string literal in c++ created in static memory? If I do: const char* StringPtr = "string0", then it is definitely somewhere in the memory, and I can get the address ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

String literals: pointer vs. char array [closed]

In this statement: char *a = "string1" What exactly is string literal? Is it string1? Because this thread String literals in C says something different. Up to my knowledge int main() { char ...

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