Linked Questions

7
votes
2answers
4k views

where in memory are string literals ? stack / heap? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: C String literals: Where do they go? as far as i know, generally, pointer have to allocated by malloc(), and will allocated to heap, then unallocated by free(); ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Char * pointer initialization [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: C String literals: Where do they go? If I have the following code char *str = "Tryout" ; where is the string going to be stored? Stack? If stack, does the pointer ...
0
votes
1answer
177 views

Which part of the memory does the string get stored in? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: C String literals: Where do they go? Here is a piece of C code that I was asked to analyze in an interview. int main() { char *ptr = "hello"; return 0; } ...
-2
votes
2answers
70 views

C: Is an Anonymous Array Allocated on the Heap or Stack? [duplicate]

For example this code here: char *s = "Hello"; Where is "Hello" being stored? Is it stored the same in memory just anonymously?
-1
votes
4answers
94 views

Do i must malloc a returned string inside a function? [duplicate]

The following program will print on the screen "Hello\nWorld\n" ('\n' = line down) as it supposed to. But actually, as i learned, something here isn't done as it should be. The "hello" and "world" ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Where does read only memory exist in code after compilation [duplicate]

char *token = "some random string"; When I declare this, I know "some random string" is stored in read-only memory. My question is where will read-only memory be? Will it be in the data section or ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

where memory get allocated for initialized char pointer in c [duplicate]

As per my understanding there is four segment where memory gets allocated i.e.code,data,bss and heap. My question in which segment does a string literal gets allocated? int main(){ char *ptr = ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Where is stocked the string corresponding to a char *? [duplicate]

I have a question in mind : earlier I disassembled a simple program with a : char *tab = "hello"; And I saw that unlike array, only the address of the string is pushed onto the stack. So I was ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Memory allocation - on stack or on heap? [duplicate]

Suppose I declare something like - char *p= "stackoverflow" ; Where does the memory gets allocated for pointer p and string "overflow" ? I suppose it gets allocated on stack for the pointer which ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Where is the string allocated in runtime C? [duplicate]

When I use char pointer to a string as: char *a = "Hello"; will the C run-time library create a memory spape for that string? If it does, where is the string "Hello" allocated, in the heap or in ...
201
votes
10answers
82k views

What is the difference between char s[] and char *s in C?

In C, I can do like this: char s[]="hello"; or char *s ="hello"; So I wonder what is the difference? I want to know what actually happens in memory allocation during compile time and run time. ...
96
votes
18answers
22k views

Why do I get a segmentation fault when writing to a string initialized with “char *s” but not “char s[]”?

The following code receives seg fault on line 2: char *str = "string"; str[0] = 'z'; printf("%s", str); While this works perfectly well: char str[] = "string"; str[0] = 'z'; ...
11
votes
8answers
9k views

Is there a need to destroy char * = “string” or char * = new char[6]

I assume when I do char* = "string" is the same thing aschar* = new char[6]. I believe these strings are created on the heap instead of the stack. So do I need to destroy them or free their memory ...
9
votes
8answers
8k views

Program aborts when using strcpy on a char pointer? (Works fine on char array)

I'm perplexed as to why the following doesn't work: char * f = "abcdef"; strcpy(f, "abcdef"); printf("%s",f); char s[] = "ddd"; strcpy(&s[0], "eee"); printf("%s", s); In both examples strcpy ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

C - Return a char pointer without malloc

Consider the following code: char* pointerTesting(void) { char* test = "hello"; return test; } int main() { char* string = pointerTesting(); printf("string: %s\n", string); } This ...

15 30 50 per page