Linked Questions

1
vote
2answers
101 views

When should I supply a move-aware overload? [duplicate]

If I have a class that manages some dynamic memory (e.g. a vector-type class) and it already has a move-constructor, does it ever make sense to supply a move-aware overload for a function, or will the ...
783
votes
7answers
75k views

What is The Rule of Three?

What does copying an object mean? What are the copy constructor and the copy assignment operator? When do I need to declare them myself? How can I prevent my objects from being copied?
33
votes
3answers
2k views

The new keyword =default in C++11

I don't understand why would I ever do this: struct S { int a; S(int aa) : a(aa) {} S() = default; }; Why not just say: S() {} // instead of S() = default; why bring in a new ...
32
votes
5answers
3k views

How to actually implement the rule of five?

UPDATE at the bottom q1: How would you implement the rule of five for a class that manages rather heavy resources, but of which you want it to be passed around by value because that greatly ...
18
votes
6answers
5k views

Best way to represent Nullable member in C++? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Nullable values in C++ What is the best way to represent nullable member in C++? In C#, we can use Nullable<T> type. Such a data type is very much needed as not ...
28
votes
2answers
893 views

What does an ampersand after this assignment operator mean?

I was reading through this nice answer regarding the "Rule-of-five" and I've noticed something that I don't recall seeing before: class C { ... C& operator=(const C&) & = default; ...
10
votes
5answers
11k views

The copy constructor and assignment operator

If I override operator= will the copy constructor automatically use the new operator? Similarly, if I define a copy constructor, will operator= automatically 'inherit' the behavior from the copy ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

C++ Laws? (similar to Law of Big Three)

I have been reading C++ and writing small programs in it for more than a year. Recently I came across Law of The Big Three. I never knew about this law. Accidentally, I found it here: Rule of ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

pointer vs non-pointer members of a class

My questions is, suppose we have two classes A and B. I want to have an object of B in class A. Should I use, class A { public: A(); ~A(); B* b; }; or class A { ...
17
votes
4answers
535 views

The C++11 way of initializing data members from arguments

Seeing as C++11 supports move semantics, when initializing data members from arguments, should we attempt to move the value instead of copying it? Here's an example showing how I would approach this ...
3
votes
6answers
2k views

Does delete[] call destructors?

I am writing a template class which internally manages an array of the given type. Like this: template<typename T> class Example { // ... private: T* objects; // allocated in c'tor ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Howto define a move constructor?

I am trying some new C++11 features on visual studio 11, started with the move constructor. I wrote a simple class called "MyClass" containing a move constructor: class MyClass { public: explicit ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

rvalue reference with assignement operator

In this article http://cpp-next.com/archive/2009/08/want-speed-pass-by-value/comment-page-1/#comment-1877 : T& T::operator=(T const& x) // x is a reference to the source { T tmp(x); ...
7
votes
3answers
670 views

c++11 optimal parameter passing

consider this classes: class A { string test; public: A (string _t) : test(move(_t)) {} A (const A & other) { *this = other; } A (A && other) { *this = move(other); } ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Memory leak when using std::vector with class elements

I have following problem: When I use std::vector with built-ins i don't get a memory but if I use classes I get memory leak. To illustrate: //No leak std::vector<double>* vecPtr1=new ...

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