In Haskell, Applicative functors are functors such that two functorial values can be combined into one, whilst the two values inside are combined via a functional application. An applicative functor has more structure than a functor but less than a monad.

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Good examples of Not a Functor/Functor/Applicative/Monad?

While explaining to someone what a type class X is I struggle to find good examples of data structures which are exactly X. So, I request examples for: A type constructor which is not a Functor. A ...
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Applicatives compose, monads don't

Applicatives compose, monads don't. What does the above statement mean? And when is one preferable to other?
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What are practical uses of applicative style?

I am a Scala programmer, learning Haskell now. It's easy to find practical use cases and real world examples for OO concepts, such as decorators, strategy pattern etc. Books and interwebs are filled ...
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Distinction between typeclasses MonadPlus, Alternative, and Monoid?

The standard-library Haskell typeclasses MonadPlus, Alternative, and Monoid each provide two methods with essentially the same semantics: An empty value: mzero, empty, or mempty. An operator a -> ...
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what does Haskell's <|> operator do?

Going through haskell's documentation is always a bit of a pain for me, because all the information you get about a function is often nothing more than just: f a -> f [a] which could mean any ...
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What are the benefits of applicative parsing over monadic parsing?

There seems to be a consensus that you should use Parsec as an applicative rather than a monad. What are the benefits of applicative parsing over monadic parsing? style performance abstraction Is ...
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Examples of Applicative Functor usage in Scala

I know that Monad can be expressed in Scala as follows: trait Monad[F[_]] { def flatMap[A, B](f: A => F[B]): F[A] => F[B] } I see why it is useful. For example, given two functions: ...
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Examples of a monad whose Applicative part can be better optimized than the Monad part

In one discussion I heard that Applicative interface of some parsers is implemented differently, more efficiently than their Monad interface. The reason is that with Applicative we know all "effects" ...
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Arrows are exactly equivalent to applicative functors?

According to the famous paper Idioms are oblivious, arrows are meticulous, monads are promiscuous, the expressive power of arrows (without any additional typeclasses) should be somewhere strictly ...
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Why should Applicative be a superclass of Monad?

Given: Applicative m, Monad m => mf :: m (a -> b), ma :: m a it seems to be considered a law that: mf <*> ma === do { f <- mf; a <- ma; return (f a) } or more concisely: ...
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What is the 'Const' applicative functor useful for?

I've just found Const in the documentation of Control.Applicative, but I have a hard time working out where this is useful, over just using Monoid directly. What am I missing?
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Where to find programming exercises for applicative functors?

I've been reading about applicative functors, notably in the Functional Pearl by McBride and Paterson. But I'd like to solidify my understanding by doing some exercises. I'd prefer programming ...
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Lax monoidal functors with a different monoidal structure

Applicative functors are well-known and well-loved among Haskellers, for their ability to apply functions in an effectful context. In category-theoretic terms, it can be shown that the methods of ...
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Haskell - What is Control.Applicative.Alternative good for?

I was looking at the Applicative class within Haskell libraries and stumbled across Alternative. What is this class good for? A google search did not reveal anything particularly insightful. And it ...
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What exactly are the categories that are being mapped by Applicative Functors?

I've been reading up on Applicative Functors and I am having difficulty reconciling a mismatch in the respective terminologies of category theory and functional programming. Although I have looked ...
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What is Control.Applicative.Lift useful for?

I wrote about transformers in a recent blog post, and someone asked "what do people use Control.Applicative.Lift for?" I wasn't able to answer this, so I echo the question to StackOverflow - what is ...
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Correspondence between type classes and grammar levels in the Chomsky hierarchy

My question is about the Applicative and Monad type classes on the one hand, and the context-free and context-sensitive grammar levels of the Chomsky hierarchy on the other. I've heard that there's a ...
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Why does <$> and <*> take input in an order opposite of >>=?

I understand the reasoning behind <$>'s type signature, as it's just an infix version of fmap, but comparing it to >>='s type signature it makes a lot less sense to me. Let's first ...
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Is it possible to use a bracketing syntactic sugar for an applicative functor?

In McBride and Paterson's 'Applicative programming with effects' they introduce some lovely syntactic sugar for lifting a pure function: [| f x y z |] for f <$> x <*> y <*> z ...
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What are Alternative's “some” and “many” useful for?

Alternative, an extension of Applicative, declares empty, <|> and these two functions: One or more: some :: f a -> f [a] Zero or more: many :: f a -> f [a] If defined, ...
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What’s an example of a Monad which is an Alternative but not a MonadPlus?

In his answer to the question “Distinction between typeclasses MonadPlus, Alternative, and Monoid?”, Edward Kmett says that Moreover, even if Applicative was a superclass of Monad, you’d wind up ...
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Proving equality of streams

I have a data type data N a = N a [N a] of rose trees and Applicative instance instance Applicative N where pure a = N a (repeat (pure a)) (N f xs) <*> (N a ys) = N (f a) (zipWith ...
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Functors and Applicatives for types of kind (* -> *) -> *

I ran into a situation where my code would benefit from using Functor and Applicative -like abstractions, but for types of kind (* -> *) -> *. Defining a higher-kinded functor can be done with ...
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Translate from monad to applicative

OK, so I know what the Applicative type class contains, and why that's useful. But I can't quite wrap my brain around how you'd use it in a non-trivial example. Consider, for example, the following ...
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More fun with applicative functors

Earlier I asked about translating monadic code to use only the applicative functor instance of Parsec. Unfortunately I got several replies which answered the question I literally asked, but didn't ...
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Difference between Monad and Applicative in Haskell

I just read the following from typeclassopedia about the difference between Monad and Applicative. I can understand that there is no join in Applicative. But the following description looks vague to ...
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What are some better ways to write [(-1,-1),(-1,0),(-1,1),(0,-1),(0,1),(1,-1),(1,0),(1,1)] in Haskell?

I've run in to a few situations where I need the list: [(-1,-1),(-1,0),(-1,1),(0,-1),(0,1),(1,-1),(1,0),(1,1)] -- no (0,0) Note that there is no (0,0) in the list. I use the (dx,dy) tuples to ...
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Which applicative functor is used for passing shared parameters?

I think I kind of understand how applicative functors work in Haskell and I'm using them for basic datatypes (Maybe, Either...). However, I found this question with the following example: withPool ...
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How to combined Futures of different types into one new Future without using zip()

I want to create a Future of type Future[(Class1,Class2,Class3)] from below code. However the only way I have found to do this is by using zip(). I find the solution ugly and properly not optimal. Can ...
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functions as applicative functors (Haskell / LYAH)

Chapter 11 of Learn You a Haskell introduces the following definition: instance Applicative ((->) r) where pure x = (\_ -> x) f <*> g = \x -> f x (g x) Here, the author ...
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Traversing lists and streams with a function returning a future

Introduction Scala's Future (new in 2.10 and now 2.9.3) is an applicative functor, which means that if we have a traversable type F, we can take an F[A] and a function A => Future[B] and turn them ...
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Why can applicative functors have side effects, but functors can't?

I'm feeling rather silly asking this question, but it's been on my mind for a while and I can't find any answers. So the question is: why can applicative functors have side effects, but functors ...
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Is it better to define Functor in terms of Applicative in terms of Monad, or vice versa?

This is a general question, not tied to any one piece of code. Say you have a type T a that can be given an instance of Monad. Since every monad is an Applicative by assigning pure = return and ...
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Any advantages to Haskell desugaring?

When I am using Functors, Monads, and other Hakell constructs, if my code is more than just a couple of lines, I prefer using some syntactic sugar like do-notation. This makes it easier for me to ...
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Applicative functors analysis

I've been trying to learn about static analysis of applicative functors. Many sources say that an advantage of using them over monads is the susceptibility to static analysis. However, the only ...
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Examples of Functors without Applicatives

Are there any good examples of Functors which are not Applicatives? By good, I'm seeking non-trivial (not Const Void) examples which don't need appeals to undefined. If there are none is there any ...
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Can I model a list of successes with short circuiting failure via the composition of applicative functors?

The user 'singpolyma' asked on reddit if there was some general structure underlying: data FailList a e = Done | Next a (FailList a e) | Fail e A free monad was suggested, but I wondered if this ...
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Why is there not 'Alternative' instance for 'Control.Applicative.Const'

There is an instance Monoid a => Monoid (Const a b) for the Const functor from Control.Applicative. There is also an instance Monoid m => Applicative (Const m). I would therefore expect that ...
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<*> for lists implemented as do notation - isn't this “cheating”?

According to 'Learn you a Haskell', the implementation of <*> for lists is: fs <*> xs = [f x | f <- fs, x <- xs] Am I mistaken, or is this sugared monadic code based on >>= ...
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Why is f <$> g <$> x equivalent to (f . g) <$> x although <$> is not right-associative?

Why is f <$> g <$> x equivalent to (f . g) <$> x although <$> is not right-associative? (This kind of equivalence is valid in a popular idiom with plain $, but currently $ is ...
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What is this special functor structure called?

Suppose that F is an applicative functor with the additional laws (with Haskell syntax): pure (const ()) <*> m === pure () pure (\a b -> (a, b)) <*> m <*> n === pure (\a b ...
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How much is applicative really about applying, rather than “combining”?

For an uncertainty-propagating Approximate type, I'd like to have instances for Functor through Monad. This however doesn't work because I need a vector space structure on the contained types, so it ...
12
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How to construct an Applicative instance with constraints (similarly to constructing Monad instances using ContT)

This question deals with constructing a proper Monad instance from something that is a monad, but only under certain constraints - for example Set. The trick is to wrap it into ContT, which defers the ...
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Applicative instance for MaybeT m assumes Monad m

I've been using the Haxl monad (described here: http://www.reddit.com/r/haskell/comments/1le4y5/the_haxl_project_at_facebook_slides_from_my_talk), which has the interesting feature that <*> for ...
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How to show that a monad is a functor and an applicative functor?

Monads are known to be theoretically a subset of functors and specifically applicative functors, even though it's not indicated in Haskell's type system. Knowing that, given a monad and basing on ...
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Haskell - Is effect order deterministic in case of Applicative?

When executing the IO action defined by someFun <$> (a :: IO ()) <$> (b :: IO ()), is the execution of the a and b actions ordered? That is, can I count on that a is executed before b is? ...
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Applicative instance for free monad

While trying to find a haskell monad that can be executed stepwise / allows threading, I discovered the free monad data Free f a = Return a | Roll (f (Free f a)) with its monad instance instance ...
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Why does the Alternative typeclass need to be a sub-class of Control.Applicative

Haskell provides a standard typeclass 'Alternative' that effectively provides the <|> operator for any type that is also an Applicative. As I understand it Alternative is considered a Monoid on ...
10
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Examples of Haskell Applicative Transformers

The wiki on www.haskell.org tells us the following about Applicative Transformers: So where are applicative transformers? The answer is, that we do not need special transformers for applicative ...
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Applicative without a functor

I have a type Image which is basically an c-array of floats. It is easy to create functions such as map :: (Float -> Float) -> Image -> Image, or zipWith :: (Float -> Float -> Float) ...