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502
votes
5answers
45k views

Do the parentheses after the type name make a difference with new?

If 'Test' is an ordinary class, is there any difference between: Test* test = new Test; //and Test* test = new Test();
373
votes
6answers
37k views

Where and why do I have to put the “template” and “typename” keywords?

In templates, where and why do I have to put typename and template on dependent names? What exactly are dependent names anyway? I have the following code: template <typename T, typename Tail> ...
60
votes
10answers
23k views

Proper stack and heap usage in C++?

I've been programming for a while but It's been mostly Java and C#. I've never actually had to manage memory on my own. I recently began programming in C++ and I'm a little confused as to when I ...
369
votes
22answers
746k views

What does the C++ standard state the size of int, long type to be?

I'm looking for detailed information regarding the size of basic C++ types. I know that it depends on the architecture (16 bits, 32 bits, 64 bits) and the compiler. But are there any standards for ...
60
votes
3answers
40k views

How do you serialize an object in C++?

I have a small hierarchy of objects that I need to serialize and transmit via a socket connection. I need to both serialize the object, then deserialize it based on what type it is. Is there an easy ...
411
votes
11answers
98k views

Why can templates only be implemented in the header file?

Quote from The C++ standard library: a tutorial and handbook: The only portable way of using templates at the moment is to implement them in header files by using inline functions. Why is this?
30
votes
2answers
11k views

Function with same name but different signature in derived class

I have a function with the same name, but with different signature in a base and derived classes. When I am trying to use the base class's function in another class that inherits from the derived, I ...
384
votes
12answers
121k views

std::wstring VS std::string

I am not able to understand the differences between std::string and std::wstring. I know wstring supports wide characters such as Unicode characters. I have got the following questions: When should ...
4273
votes
1answer
820k views

The Definitive C++ Book Guide and List

This question attempts to collect the few pearls among the dozens of bad C++ books that are published every year. Unlike many other programming languages, which are often picked up on the go from ...
30
votes
7answers
15k views

Why do we actually need Private or Protected inheritance in C++?

In C++, I can't think of a case in which I would like to inherit private/protected from a base class: class Base; class Derived1 : private Base; class Derived2 : protected Base; Is it really ...
836
votes
4answers
177k views

When should static_cast, dynamic_cast, const_cast and reinterpret_cast be used?

What are the proper uses of: static_cast dynamic_cast const_cast reinterpret_cast C-style cast (type)value Function-style cast type(value) and how does one decide which one to use in a specific ...
11
votes
6answers
6k views

Proper replacement for the missing 'finally' in C++

Since there is no finally in C++ you have to use the RAII design pattern instead, if you want your code to be exception safe. One way to do this is by using the destructor of a local class like this: ...
277
votes
13answers
61k views

What is object slicing?

Someone mentioned it in the IRC, but google doesn't have a good answer.
1178
votes
55answers
913k views

Split a string in C++?

What's the most elegant way to split a string in C++? The string can be assumed to be composed of words separated by whitespace. (Note that I'm not interested in C string functions or that kind of ...
445
votes
6answers
95k views

What are the rules about using an underscore in a C++ identifier?

It's common in C++ to name member variables with some kind of prefix to denote the fact that they're member variables, rather than local variables or parameters. If you've come from an MFC background, ...
192
votes
9answers
58k views

C++: “std::endl” vs “\n”

Many C++ books contain example code like this... std::cout << "Test line" << std::endl; ...so I've always done that too. But I've seen a lot of code from working developers like this ...
83
votes
7answers
9k views

Default constructor with empty brackets

Is there any good reason that an empty set of round brackets (parentheses) isn't valid for calling the default constructor in C++? MyObject object; // ok - default ctor MyObject object(blah); // ...
118
votes
10answers
66k views

Does C++ support 'finally' blocks? (And what's this 'RAII' I keep hearing about?)

Does C++ support 'finally' blocks? What is the RAII idiom? What is the difference between C++'s RAII idiom and C#'s 'using' statement?
343
votes
12answers
38k views

Do-While and if-else statements in C/C++ macros

In many C/C++ macros I'm seeing the code of the macro wrapped in what seems like a meaningless do while loop. Here are examples. #define FOO(X) do { f(X); g(X); } while (0) #define FOO(X) if (1) { ...
389
votes
6answers
99k views

What are POD types in C++?

I've come across this term POD-type a few times... what does it mean?
27
votes
5answers
4k views

Is it possible to prevent stack allocation of an object and only allow it to be instantiated with 'new'?

Is it possible to prevent stack allocation of an object and only allow it to be instiated with 'new' on the heap?
19
votes
4answers
3k views

How do I prevent a class from being allocated via the 'new' operator? (I'd like to ensure my RAII class is always allocated on the stack.)

I'd like to ensure my RAII class is always allocated on the stack. How do I prevent a class from being allocated via the 'new' operator?
79
votes
10answers
8k views

How do I remove code duplication between similar const and non-const member functions?

Let's say I have the following class X where I want to return access to an internal member: class Z { // details }; class X { std::vector<Z> vecZ; public: Z& Z(size_t index) ...
956
votes
8answers
308k views

What does the explicit keyword in C++ mean?

Someone posted in a comment to another question about the meaning of the explicit keyword in C++. So, what does it mean?
230
votes
7answers
45k views

Why isn't sizeof for a struct equal to the sum of sizeof of each member?

Why does the 'sizeof' operator return a size larger for a structure than the total sizes of the structure's members?
148
votes
6answers
24k views

Why is it wrong to use std::auto_ptr<> with standard containers?

Why is it wrong to use std::auto_ptr<> with standard containers?
480
votes
9answers
136k views

What is a smart pointer and when should I use one?

What is a smart pointer and when should I use one?
331
votes
8answers
70k views

What is the strict aliasing rule?

When asking about common undefined behavior in C, souls more enlightened than I referred to the strict aliasing rule. What are they talking about?
175
votes
22answers
128k views

What are the differences between struct and class in C++?

This question was already asked in the context of C#/.Net. Now I'd like to learn the differences between a struct and a class in C++. Please discuss the technical differences as well as reasons for ...
396
votes
12answers
40k views

Where do I find the current C or C++ standard documents?

For many questions the answer seems to be found in "the standard". However, where do we find that? Preferably online. Googling can sometimes feel futile, again especially for the C standards, since ...
70
votes
29answers
60k views

Memory management in C++ [closed]

What are some general tips to make sure I don't leak memory in C++ programs ? How do I figure out who should free memory that has been dynamically allocated ?
71
votes
12answers
15k views

Why does volatile exist?

What does the volatile keyword do? In C++ what problem does it solve? In my case, I have never knowingly needed it.
934
votes
24answers
306k views

What are the differences between a pointer variable and a reference variable in C++?

I know references are syntactic sugar, so code is easier to read and write. But what are the differences? Summary from answers and links below: A pointer can be re-assigned any number of times ...
67
votes
4answers
14k views

How to overload std::swap()

std::swap() is used by many std containers (such as std::list and std::vector) during sorting and even assignment. But the std implementation of swap() is very generalized and rather inefficient for ...