17
votes
1answer
430 views

Idris eager evaluation

In Haskell, I might implement if like this: if' True x y = x if' False x y = y spin 0 = () spin n = spin (n - 1) This behaves how I expect: haskell> if' True (spin 1000000) () -- takes a ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Iterators or lazy evaluation benefits

I recently built a linq alternative in typescript for my clientside javascript. I know there are many open source items available but I wanted to build it myself for the challenge. I started to look ...
8
votes
1answer
179 views

Why do “data Unit = Unit” and “()” behave differently in GHCi?

In GHCi: (> means output) data Unit = Unit let x = Unit let y = () :p x > x = (_t1::Unit) :p y > y = () :i () > data () = () -- Defined in `GHC.Tuple' Why do Unit and () behave ...
1
vote
1answer
113 views

Lazy Evaluation and Strict Evaluation Haskell

I understand what lazy evaluation is, and how it works and the advantages it has, but could you explain me what strict evaluation really is in Haskell? I can't seem to find much info about it, since ...
5
votes
1answer
221 views

Making a list “unlazy” in clojure

I recently noticed that there was a very clear implementation of insertion sort here : Insertion sort in clojure throws StackOverFlow error which suffers from a memory overflow, due to the fact ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Call by need vs call by name

I didn't understand the diffrence between Call-by-name and Call-by-need. As I understood, Call-by-need method restores the answer returned. But how It helps us, and Is there any fundamental difference ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Should Laziness be Documented in an API?

There's many times that I wish documentation would be more explicit regarding how eagerly they evaluate to get their result. Note how ambiguous I'm being here: evaluating what? The parameter values? ...
22
votes
2answers
2k views

How does seq force functions?

Background This question arises from a challenge Brent Yorgey posed at OPLSS: write a function f :: (Int -> Int) -> Bool that distinguishes f undefined from f (\x -> undefined). All of our ...
9
votes
2answers
432 views

Forced strictness for lists in haskell

I made really time consuming algorithm which produces a short string as the result. When I try to print it (via putStrLn) it appears on the screen character by character. I did understand why that ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

R: passing expression to an inner function

Further delving into the mysteries of R evaluation...This is closely related to my previous question ( How to write an R function that evaluates an expression within a data-frame ). Let's say I want ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

How to write an R function that evaluates an expression within a data-frame

Puzzle for the R cognoscenti: Say we have a data-frame: df <- data.frame( a = 1:5, b = 1:5 ) I know we can do things like with(df, a) to get a vector of results. But how do I write a ...
2
votes
2answers
686 views

F# lazy eval from stream reader?

I'm running into a bug in my code that makes me think that I don't really understand some of the details about F# and lazy evaluation. I know that F# evaluates eagerly and therefore am somewhat ...
16
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the relationship between unboxed types and strictness?

Unboxed types, like Int#, and strict functions, like f (!x) = ..., are something different, but I see conceptual similarity - they disallow thunks/laziness in some way. If Haskell was a strict ...
10
votes
3answers
5k views

What is “Call By Name”?

I'm working in a homework, and the professor asked me to implement the evaluation strategy called "call by name" in scheme in a certain language that we developed and he gave us an example at ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

is it possible to print all reductions in Haskell - using WinHugs?

I have written the following function.. and executed using WinHugs teneven = [x | x <- [1..10], even x] My output : Main> teneven [2,4,6,8,10] :: [Integer] (63 reductions, 102 cells) is ...