4
votes
2answers
102 views

Haskell using foldl like recursion

I'm trying to get a function working that uses foldl to go through a list of tuples and create a string from it. I'm trying to create a similar function that already works using recursion. Here is ...
6
votes
2answers
240 views

How do I break out of a pure loop in Haskell without hand-written recursion?

I want to write a function that goes through a list updating an accumulator until that accumulator reaches a certain condition or I get to the end of the list. For example, a product function that ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

How “to fold recursively by a tag” a group of selected (neighbor) tags with XSLT1?

I was comment the present problem at this other one: the present is more complex because needs a recurrence. Detailing by example: <root> <c>cccc</c> <a ...
3
votes
3answers
224 views

How can this function be written using foldr?

I have this simple function which returns a list of pairs with the adjacents elements of a list. adjacents :: [a] -> [(a,a)] adjacents (x:y:xs) = [(x,y)] ++ adjacents (y:xs) adjacents (x:xs) = [] ...
1
vote
2answers
211 views

Implementing fold in simple purely functional language without lazy evaluation

I am trying to implement a simple functional language for automatic program synthesis. The data structure is a graph of functions and values, which compiles down to javascript. The following graph ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Folds versus recursion in Erlang

According to Learn you some Erlang : Pretty much any function you can think of that reduces lists to 1 element can be expressed as a fold. [...] This means fold is universal in the sense that ...
20
votes
4answers
3k views

Why is foldl defined in a strange way in Racket?

In Haskell, like in many other functional languages, the function foldl is defined such that, for example, foldl (-) 0 [1,2,3,4] = -10. This is OK, because foldl (-) 0 [1, 2,3,4] is, by definition, ...
25
votes
6answers
4k views

Idiomatic construction to check whether a collection is ordered

With the intention of learning and further to this question, I've remained curious of the idiomatic alternatives to explicit recursion for an algorithm that checks whether a list (or collection) is ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

reversing a list in OCaml using fold_left/right

UPDATE - Solution Thanks to jacobm for his help, I came up with a solution. // Folding Recursion let reverse_list_3 theList = List.fold_left (fun element recursive_call -> ...
3
votes
7answers
5k views

Using Haskell's map function to calculate the sum of a list

Haskell addm::[Int]->Int addm (x:xs) = sum(x:xs) I was able to achieve to get a sum of a list using sum function but is it possible to get the sum of a list using map function ? .. also what ...
31
votes
4answers
4k views

Writing foldl using foldr

In the RealWorldHaskell, Chapter 4. Functional Programming Write foldl with foldr: -- file: ch04/Fold.hs myFoldl :: (a -> b -> a) -> a -> [b] -> a myFoldl f z xs = foldr step id xs z ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Recursion over lists in Haskell

For instance, i have a list like ['a','b','c','d','e']. I want to do something like this: First do something with the first two elements, f 'a' 'b' Then do the same thing with the return value of f ...
7
votes
1answer
681 views

Recursive bottom-up traversal of algebraic data types

When dealing with sizeable algebraic data types in Haskell, there is a particular recursive traversal not captured by folding over the data type. For instance, suppose I have a simple data type ...
71
votes
8answers
10k views

Implications of foldr vs. foldl (or foldl')

Firstly, Real World Haskell, which I am reading, says to never use foldl instead of foldl'. So I trust it. But I'm hazy on when to use foldr vs. foldl'. Though I can see the structure of how they ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

C stack overflow on Project Euler 27

I just have started to learn Haskell and combine reading books and tutorials with solving problems from Project Euler. I have stuck on Problem 27 because I get "C stack overflow" error using this ...