3
votes
2answers
106 views

Why must IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() and GetEnumerator() be implemented?

Working on implementing the IEnumerable interface with C#. I actually found two methods that need to be implemented: public IEnumerator<Item> GetEnumerator() System.Collections.IEnumerator ...
1
vote
1answer
130 views

GetIterator() and the iterator pattern

im trying to implement the iterator pattern. basically from what i understand it makes a class "foreachble" and makes the code more secure by not revealing the exact collection type to the user. i ...
2
votes
2answers
119 views

IEnumerator<T> / IEnumerable<T> with position stored only temporarily?

I'm developing a graph where I need to keep the memory usage per node as low as possible. Each node implements IEnumerator / IEnumerable. IEnumerator / IEnumerable make use of "position" in the ...
0
votes
3answers
517 views

Java equivalent to IEnumerator from C#?

Are there interfaces in Java library, which also enumerates some series, but follows slightly another logic than Iterator and Enumeration? Namely they should return boolean on next(), saying whether ...
12
votes
4answers
433 views

Why does Iterator define the remove() operation?

In C#, the IEnumerator interface defines a way to traverse a collection and look at the elements. I think this is tremendously useful because if you pass IEnumerable<T> to a method, it's not ...
7
votes
7answers
453 views

Why was GetEnumerator() stored in a separate interface from IEnumerator?

I was wondering why the GetEnumerator() method was factored out of IEnumerator and placed in IEnumerable. It seems to me that it would make more sense to keep all of the enumerator methods in ...
3
votes
4answers
6k views

.NET: is there a “HasNext” method for an IEnumerator?

With Java Iterators, I have used the hasNext method to determine whether an iteration has more elements (without consuming an element) -- thus, hasNext is like a "Peek" method. My question: is there ...
3
votes
6answers
2k views

Implementing a bidirectional enumerator in C#

Is there a way to use yield blocks to implement an IEnumerator<T> which can go backward (MoveLast()) as well as forward?
24
votes
3answers
6k views

Is Yield Return == IEnumerable & IEnumerator?

I just want to verify, is yield return a shortcut for implementing IEnumerable and IEnumerator? Thanks, John