7
votes
2answers
311 views

Why does Haskell hide functions with the same name but different type signatures?

Suppose I was to define (+) on Strings but not by giving an instance of Num String. Why does Haskell now hide Nums (+) function? After all, the function I have provided: (+) :: String -> String ...
12
votes
7answers
5k views

Why isn't Array a generic type?

Array is declared following: public abstract class Array : ICloneable, IList, ICollection, IEnumerable { I'm wondering why isn't it: public partial class Array<T> : ICloneable, ...
3
votes
2answers
99 views

Do Static vs. Dynamic Types Have Anything to Do With Making it More Difficult To Write an IDE?

Edit: Just to clarify, I didn't intend to suggest it might be impossible to write an IDE for dynamic languages. /edit In my specific experience I'm thinking about years of conversations/comments ...
3
votes
1answer
151 views

How can type classes be used to implement persistence, introspection, identity, printing,

In the discussion on The Myths of Object-Orientation, Tim Sweeney describes what he thinks is a good alternative to the all-encompassing frameworks that we all use today. He seems most interested in ...
31
votes
2answers
1k views

In C#, why is “int” an alias for System.Int32?

Since C# supports Int8, Int16, Int32 and Int64, why did the designers of the language choose to define int as an alias for Int32 instead of allowing it to vary depending on what the native ...
35
votes
2answers
530 views

Datatype promotion for dependently challenged

After reading through the ghc 7.4. pre-release notes and the Giving Haskell a Promotion paper, I'm still confused on what you actually do with promoted types. For example, the GHC manual gives the ...
21
votes
1answer
554 views

Which property of Scala's type-system make it Turing-complete? [closed]

Scala uses a type-system based on System F ω, which is normally said to be strongly normalizing. Strongly normalizing implies non-Turing completeness. Nevertheless, Scala's type-system is ...
4
votes
3answers
360 views

Consequences of inability to add natural numbers in C

In System F I can define the genuine total addition function using Church numerals. In Haskell I cannot define that function because of the bottom value. For example, in haskell if x + y = x, then I ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Is Java's lack of unsigned primitive types a characteristic of Java the platform or Java the language?

There are questions about why Java doesn't support unsigned types and a few questions about dealing with unsigned types. I did some searching, and it appears that Scala also doesn't support unsigned ...
2
votes
0answers
236 views

Type inference for imperative statements other than assignment [closed]

In my search for research papers about type systems for imperative languages, I only find solutions for a language with mutable references but without genuine imperative control structures such as ...
13
votes
1answer
171 views

Compiler error about class graph being not finitary due to a expansively recursive type parameter

With this piece of code: trait B[T] trait C[T] class A[T] extends B[A[C[T]]] I get the following error: error: class graph is not finitary because type parameter T is expansively recursive ...
7
votes
4answers
345 views

Is it possible to implement F#'s infrastructure for Units of Measurement in Scala?

F# ships with special support for a unit of measurement system, which provides static type safety while compiling down to the numeric types instead of burdening the runtime with wrapping/unwrapping ...
8
votes
4answers
441 views

What is necessary from a language implementation point of view to implement type providers like in F# 3.0?

F# 3.0 adds type providers, which make it basically unnecessary to manually write or generate mappings between a DB (or another data provider) and the language/type system, because the language can ...
4
votes
3answers
161 views

What are the benefits of types being first-class objects?

Does anybody here have good examples where types as first-class objects come in hand? I guess it helps to straightforwardly implement some math concepts, indeed that is the kind of examples I'm ...
17
votes
2answers
4k views

Scala's .type and Java's .class literal

I wonder from a language design perspective why Scala has removed Java's class literal (e. g. String.class) and replaced it with classOf[String], but has then added a "type literal" with its ...
5
votes
1answer
296 views

Is scala.Singleton pure compiler fiction?

The Scala Language Specification says under §3.2.1: A stable type is either a singleton type or a type which is declared to be a subtype of trait scala.Singleton. I couldn't find ...
34
votes
4answers
2k views

What is the difference between a class and a type in Scala (and Java)?

Scala Where can differences between a class and a type be observed in Scala and why is this distinction important? Is it only a consideration from the language design point-of-view or has it ...
5
votes
2answers
367 views

Which reasons exist for differences between compile time types and run time types?

In Scala/Java (~ on the JVM), there are some smaller cases where behavior is different like: /* "Dynamic" cast */ "".getClass.cast("Foo") //res0: Any = Foo /* "Static" cast */ ...
1
vote
1answer
107 views

Interesting or unique types encountered? [closed]

What is the most strange or unique type you have seen in a programming language? I was thinking the other day about a "random variable", ie whenever it is evaluated it yields a random value from ...
61
votes
5answers
6k views

Why are C# 3.0 object initializer constructor parentheses optional?

It seems that the C# 3.0 object initializer syntax allows one to exclude the open/close pair of parentheses in the constructor when there is a parameterless constructor existing. Example: var x = new ...
34
votes
4answers
3k views

James Gosling's explanation of why Java's byte is signed

I was initially surprised that Java decides to specify that byte is signed, with a range from -128..127 (inclusive). I'm under the impression that most 8-bit number representations are unsigned, with ...
61
votes
5answers
6k views

Why is there “data” and “newtype” in Haskell?

To me it seems that a newtype definition is just a data definition that obeys some restrictions (only one constructor and such), and that due to these restrictions the runtime system can handle ...
2
votes
2answers
131 views

What is a universal type?

I have heard the term "universal type" thrown around in the context of programming language type systems, does anybody know what this means? Is is something to do with objects like a String where two ...
5
votes
6answers
402 views

Any reason for having “val capacity : Int” instead of “val Int Capacity” in Scala

I am reading Scala and I am wondering ... Why val capacity : Int instead of val Int capacity. Any reason why this choice was made. If not, it does not seem to me like a good choice to move away ...
1
vote
2answers
56 views

Literal structure for time datatype

I'm working on a DSL that should support a time literal and am interested in two different things: What language(s) or DSL(s) support a time literal? How is the literal structured? I'm leaning ...