For questions about the intricacies of formal or authoritative specifications of programming languages and environments.

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0
votes
1answer
28 views

Shouldn't standard specializations of std::atomic lack value constructor

The general version of the std::atomic template has a value constructor declared as constexpr atomic( T desired ); (See here) It is also said that bool, integral and pointer specializations of the ...
20
votes
1answer
304 views

Is a class with deleted copy-constructor trivially copyable?

Is this class: class A { public: A() = default; A(const A&) = delete; }; trivially copyable? (At least clang seems to think so (live)) In particular, would A a,b; ...
9
votes
1answer
209 views

Is std::abs(0u) ill-formed?

Given the following program: #include <cmath> int main() { std::abs(0u) ; } gcc and clang disagree on whether this is ill-formed. Using gcc with libstdc++ the code builds without error ...
12
votes
4answers
405 views

Is the term “method” defined by the C++ Standard?

The term "method" is often used to discuss C++ code. Does the standalone term have a well-defined meaning in C++ or is it ambiguous? Is it acceptable to use the term by itself, or should it be ...
8
votes
1answer
210 views

What's the purpose of function with only unspecified number of parameters?

In other words when function declared like this with 'T' being some type-alias: T (...) will be ever useful? If you don't know such declaration specifies a function with unknown number of ...
7
votes
1answer
163 views

Where in the Standard (C++14) does it say that the following two declarations are equivalent?

struct A{}; int A; struct A a; struct A::A b; The last two declarations above are equivalent.They both declare objects of type A. Where in the Standard can I find or deduce this?
0
votes
2answers
30 views

Defining a function and a variable in one declaration statement

I am pretty sure the following is legal int a, *b, c[5], d(char x); This defines an integer a, a pointer to int b, an array of 5 ints c, and declares a function d taking a char and returning int. ...
3
votes
2answers
43 views

Virtual base to derived cast of a non-polymorphic type

Base-to-derived conversion requires explicit cast though either static_cast or dynamic_cast. When the base is virtual, only the latter applies. Furthermore, dynamic_cast can only be used on ...
13
votes
2answers
203 views

Should the following code compile under Java 1.8

given the following class: public class FooTest { public static class Base { } public static class Derived extends Base { } public interface Service<T extends Base> { ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Details in the process of constructing a std::thread object

I'm interested in (and confused about) the details of constructing a std::thread object. According to cppreference, both the thread function and all arguments are value-copied to some ...
7
votes
1answer
91 views

Implicit synchronization when creating/joining threads

What is the minimal framing required for x's type for this code to work, considering the implied synchronization when creating/joining a thread: std::atomic? volatile? nothing? #include ...
77
votes
2answers
3k views

Program being compiled differently in 3 major C++ compilers. Which one is right?

As an interesting follow-up (not of big practical importance though) to my previous question: Why does C++ allow us to surround the variable name in parentheses when declaring a variable? I found out ...
5
votes
0answers
106 views

What replacements are available for formerly-widely-supported behaviors not defined by C standard

In the early days of C prior to standardization, implementations had a variety of ways of handling exceptional and semi-exceptional cases of various actions. Some of them would trigger traps which ...
21
votes
4answers
569 views

What does the C++ standard say about std::vector<int> v1,v2; std::distance(v1.begin(),v2.begin())?

I have this code #include <vector> #include <iostream> int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { std::vector<int> v1,v2; std::cout << std::distance(v1.begin(),v2.begin()); ...
4
votes
3answers
81 views

Initializer with constant expression having possible overflow in C99

Is this valid C99 code? If so, does it define an implementation-defined behavior? int a; unsigned long b[] = {(unsigned long)&a+1}; From my understanding of the C99 standard, from §6.6 in the ...
2
votes
4answers
66 views

Different C# Output Between Release and Debug

I've a little C# program here that produces different output between the Debug and Release versions. The empty output from the Release version is, I think, consistent with the C# Language ...
9
votes
0answers
95 views

Is this change in overload resolution between Clang 3.5 and 3.6 correct or a bug?

The code below compiles in Visual Studio 2013, gcc 4.8, clang 3.4 and clang 3.5 (Apple LLVM 6.0) but does not compile in clang 3.6 (via Apple LLVM 6.1) The code is a simplified version of a ...
6
votes
3answers
84 views

What is the behavior when a printf specifier flag is repeated?

fprintf() family of functions have 5 flag characters '-', '+', ' ', '#', '0'. What is the specified behavior, if any, when a flag is repeated? #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { printf("% ...
2
votes
2answers
55 views

converting iterator to pointer - especially at end()

I'm wondering if this is defined: vector<int> v; v.push_back(1337); int * p1 = &*vi.end(); (Update 1 If this is undefined, I'd like to know more about exactly where my error is. For ...
3
votes
1answer
61 views

I'd like to see one example where the conversion-type-id is looked up in the context of the entire postfix-expression

In [basic.lookup.classref]/7 (C++14) we have (emphasis is mine): If the id-expression is a conversion-function-id, its conversion-type-id is first looked up in the class of the object expression ...
2
votes
3answers
94 views

Can I return pointer to VLA?

Is such function prototype valid in C? int (*func())[*]; And if it is, how can I define such functions?
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Forwarded in-place construction and list-initialization

By forwarded in-place construction, I take to mean std::allocator::construct and the various emplace methods, e.g., std::vector::emplace_back. I just find that forwarded in-place construction in C++ ...
8
votes
1answer
86 views

Issues concerning const decltype(x)&

Consider the following code: int a = 1; const int& b = a; std::cout << std::is_same<const decltype(b)&, const int&>(); It compiles on clang 3.5 while GCC 4.9 gives the ...
4
votes
4answers
125 views

Can a variable be used while being declared?

Why does the following compile without an error?: int main() { int x = x; //I thought this should cause an error return 0; } Where in the standards is it explained why this is allowed?
1
vote
3answers
71 views

Why don't pointer to VLA function parameters deduce their size automatically and is there currently any good usage of them?

As I understand it every VLA have an hidden variable of it's size which value can be 'acquired' by sizeof operator. What I don't get here is pointer to VLA's used in function parameters - why isn't ...
5
votes
0answers
194 views

Why isn't the “noexcept” specifier part of the function type?

I don't get it why? I don't think compatibility should be a problem as functions declared without the specifier actually have it implicitly defined to false. If it's about name mangling - can we just ...
7
votes
1answer
98 views

I need some help regarding §8/5 in the spec

§8/5: The optional attribute-specifier-seq in a trailing-return-type appertains to the indicated return type. The type-id in a trailing-return-type includes the longest possible sequence of ...
4
votes
2answers
77 views

Syntax for defining const array type

Be warned, I'm just interested in the possibility of C++ syntax, not in any practical use. It easy to define an array type. As an example, int a[3]; defines an array type of 3 int, while const int ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

The term `function declaration` is defined in §7/9 (N4140), but it isn't defined as a grammar production. Why?

In §7/9 you'll find the definition of a function declaration: If the decl-specifier-seq contains no typedef specifier, the declaration is called a function declaration if the type associated ...
1
vote
2answers
63 views

Passing a dummy lock to std::condition_variable_any::wait

Suppose there are three threads A, B, and C. B and C suspend at a certain point, waiting for A to signal them to continue. Among the thread synchronization facilities provided by standard C++, ...
-4
votes
3answers
122 views

Legality of empty, unnamed enumeration specifier

In the example in §7.5 (C++14) one finds: enum {}; // ill-formed But, technically speaking, I think the code is valid.enum {} is an enum-specifier, and so, it's a type-specifier, which is a ...
5
votes
1answer
60 views

Trailing padding in internal structure

Compilers typically insert trailing padding on structures to satisfy alignment restrictions when they are used in arrays: // Size 4, alignment 2 struct A { uint16_t x; uint8_t y; // ...
8
votes
3answers
188 views

Does using bitwise not operator (~) on boolean values invoke Undefined Behavior?

If a C++ program applies the bitwise-not operator (~) to a boolean value, does that invoke Undefined Behavior? E.g. is the following program well-defined? bool f = false; bool f2 = ~f; // is f2 ...
31
votes
4answers
2k views

What's the result of a & b?

This is awkward, but the bitwise AND operator is defined in the C++ standard as follows (emphasis mine). The usual arithmetic conversions are performed; the result is the bitwise AND function of ...
2
votes
2answers
80 views

Perfect forwarder in Herb Sutter's C++Con 2014 talk

In Herb Sutter's talk at C++Con 2014, among other things he discusses passing by value, by reference, and so forth. One technique he presents in this albeit contrived example is: using namespace std; ...
14
votes
2answers
138 views

Template non-type arguments for reference type and odr-used

Is the variable v in the sample code below odr-used? extern void* v; template<void*&> void f() {} int main() { f<v>(); } I found this pattern in Boost ML. cf. ...
4
votes
1answer
146 views

Is an expression involving function type an lvalue or an rvalue?

void fn() {} void (&lref)() = fn; void (&&rref)() = fn; int main() {} Compiles well under g++ 4.8.1. So, fn is an expression, and an expression must have a category according to the ...
3
votes
1answer
73 views

Why can a typedef-name for a struct not be used interchangeably with the struct name?

The following code (live example) does not compile: struct S {}; typedef struct S T; S s = T(); // OK struct T * p; // error: elaborated type refers to a typedef T::T(){} // ...
3
votes
2answers
71 views

Double closing angle brackets (>>) generate syntax error in SPECIFIC case

Eclipse (Luna, 4.4.2) tells me that I have a syntax error on the following line: static_cast<Vec<int, DIM>>(a.mul(b)); I remembered that double closing angle brackets >> can lead ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Unexpected behaviour with overload resolution when using std::initializer_list with a boolean overloaded function

I am trying to use an initialization list with different overloaded function as shown in the example code below. It seems that the boolean overload and the array overload has an exclusive ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Swapping `std::aligned_storage` instances containing non-trivially-copyable types - undefined behavior?

ideone link #include <iostream> #include <type_traits> using namespace std; // Non-trivially-copyable type. struct NTC { int x; NTC(int mX) : x(mX) { } ~NTC() { ...
2
votes
2answers
121 views

Is f(++i, ++i) undefined?

I seem to recall that in C++11, they made some changes to the sequencing behaviour and that now i++ and ++i have different sequencing requirements. Is f(++i, ++i) still undefined behaviour? What is ...
4
votes
1answer
322 views

Swap integers via XOR in single line. Is it really allowed in c++11?

I still could not clearly understand whether the expression x ^= y ^= x ^= y; valid in C++11 (as they say in this thread) or it leads to undefined behavior? The reasons given by the link seem ...
-1
votes
0answers
95 views

Base class with pure virtual functions

I have a class layout similar to this: class O {}; class D : public virtual O { public: virtual float foo() const = 0; }; class B : public D { public: B(float, float) {} }; class R : ...
6
votes
1answer
186 views

Does C++11 require allocators to be default constructible, libstdc++ and libc++ disagree?

Using a slightly modified version of Howard Hinnants's C++11 stack allocator which is documented here, with std::basic_string and compiling with gcc which is using libstdc++, the following example ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Why are unions which have members with differing access control not standard-layout?

§9.0 7. A class S is a standard-layout class if it: (7.3) has the same access control (Clause 11 ) for all non-static data members, 8 A standard-layout struct is a ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Can the note in §9.5.1 apply to literal types?

§9.5.1 States: [ Note: One special guarantee is made in order to simplify the use of unions: If a standard-layout union contains several standard-layout structs that share a common initial ...
2
votes
5answers
80 views

Issues about the signedness of char

According to the standard, whether char is signed or not is implementation-defined. This has caused me some trouble. Following are some examples: 1) Testing the most significant bit. If char is ...
2
votes
3answers
91 views

casting pointer to array into pointer

Consider the following C code: int arr[2] = {0, 0}; int *ptr = (int*)&arr; ptr[0] = 5; printf("%d\n", arr[0]); Now, it is clear that the code prints 5 on common compilers. However, can somebody ...
21
votes
6answers
485 views

Pointer-to-array overlapping end of array

Is this code correct? int arr[2]; int (*ptr)[2] = (int (*)[2]) &arr[1]; ptr[0][0] = 0; Obviously ptr[0][1] would be invalid by accessing out of bounds of arr. Note: There's no doubt that ...