For questions about the intricacies of formal or authoritative specifications of programming languages and environments.

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'() vs () in Common Lisp

In Common Lisp, it seems like () is a self-evaluating form. That is, it evaluates to itself (or its alias nil). So there would seem to be no need to quote it. But using grep on my quicklisp ...
3
votes
0answers
43 views

array in std::tuple passed to std::tuple_cat in decltype error - g++ vs clang++ - which compiler is right

Consider the code below: #include <tuple> int main() { std::tuple<char[2], int> t1; std::tuple<int> t2; decltype(std::tuple_cat(t1, t2)) t3; } It compiles fine with g++ ...
2
votes
2answers
64 views

Scoped enumerations: error: cannot convert ‘int’ to ‘Handle’ in initialization

I am reading the Scoped enumerations page from here: So I decided to give it a try: $ cat e.cxx #include <cstdint> enum class Handle : uint32_t { Invalid = 0 }; int main() { Handle h { 42 ...
8
votes
2answers
80 views

How do one use `offsetof` to access a field in a standard conforming way?

Let's suppose I have a struct and extract the offset to a member: struct A { int x; }; size_t xoff = offsetof(A, x); how can I, given a pointer to struct A extract the member in a standard ...
15
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2answers
212 views

Can a variable be redeclared as auto that deduced to the same type? [duplicate]

Is the following allowed by the standard? #include <iostream> extern int a; auto a = 3; int main(int, char**) { std::cout << a << std::endl; return 0; } clang accepts ...
7
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0answers
32 views

g++ and clang++ different behaviour with initialization of C-style array of class types [duplicate]

I suppose it's a g++ bug but I'm asking for confirmation. The following code: #include <complex> #include <iostream> int main() { std::complex<double> ac[10] = 23.5; for ...
4
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1answer
67 views

Plain Old Data - Alignment requirements

Suppose I have two POD structs A and B with the same initial sequence of members, but some differences later (I know, this could easily be solved with inheritance). struct A { int x; uint64_t ...
3
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1answer
36 views

Is a unicode escape valid in the let keyword

Is using a unicode escape sequence valid in the let keyword? Restating: Is the following code valid? l\u0065t a = 1; Is it equivalent to this code: let a = 1;
2
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0answers
46 views

What is the expected behaviour when `q()` is called, if q has been user-defined?

The function q() terminates the current R session. But it is not a reserved word, so q <- function(x) x + 1 is not an error. However, in RStudio calling q(42) starts a prompt asking me how to ...
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3answers
72 views

Why doesn't C++ allow :: on objects of known types? [on hold]

#include <vector> int main() { std::vector< int > vi; // This is legal. for( std::vector< int >::iterator it = vi.begin(); it != vi.end(); ++it ) { } // ...
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2answers
69 views

What are tag name spaces?

The C standard says: 7.1.3 Reserved identifiers All identifiers that begin with an underscore are always reserved for use as identifiers with file scope in both the ordinary and tag name ...
-1
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3answers
101 views

what do heap and stack mean in C++? [duplicate]

I hear these words thrown around a lot but I don't understand what they mean in c++. Somebody told me to look it up in the standard but in the index there's no mention of "stack" or "heap", only stack ...
23
votes
5answers
673 views

C++ postfix expression undefined vs unspecified behaviour

Apologies in advance, I know the general topic of evaluation order has had a lot of SO questions on it already. However, having looked at them, I want to clarify a few specific points that I don't ...
7
votes
1answer
94 views

Initializing a dynamic array of non-default constructible objects

The code below: struct Foo { Foo(int){} // no default constructor }; int main() { Foo* pFoo = new Foo[2]{1,2}; // OK in g++, fails in clang++! delete[] pFoo; } compiles in gcc, but ...
12
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3answers
231 views

Cast between structs from different scopes

I am interested in casting between pointers to structs that are potentially compatible. They'll use the same tag, the same members in the same order. Although the target codebase is compiled as either ...
6
votes
1answer
133 views

Is it allowed to use decltype on std::declval<T> (the function itself, not the result of calling it)?

The following code triggers a static assertion on libstdc++: #include <utility> using t = decltype(std::declval<const void>); Should it? Motivation for this question: The following ...
11
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1answer
169 views

Operator cast, GCC and clang: which compiler is right?

Consider the following code: struct S { using T = int; operator T() { return 42; } }; int main() { S s; S::T t = s; // Is the following line correct? t = s.operator T(); } ...
12
votes
1answer
94 views

Global scope resolution in the presence of using namespace

Consider the following code: namespace foo { namespace bar { class foo {}; } class baz {}; } using namespace foo::bar; ::foo::baz mybaz; Is this code valid? Or is ::foo ambiguous? Or ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

Is the Shebang (#!) standardized?

Is the Shebang #!, e.g. #!/bin/sh in front of script executables officially standardized in the Linux Standard Base or in any of The Open Group standards or elsewhere? If yes, please provide ...
6
votes
1answer
66 views

Calling a constexpr method through a reference - is the result a constant expression?

The following code #include <array> void foo(const std::array<int, 42> &a) { constexpr size_t S = a.size(); } int main() {} compiles fine in GCC, but fails to compile in clang ...
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2answers
42 views

ODR-usage behaviour rationale

Why passing argument by const reference always means the object is ODR-used? I understand, because Standard defines it this way, but why didn't it make exception at least for integral constants? For ...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

gcc/clang vs. MSVC: Does a static_assert in a function have to be evaluated if the return type is bad?

In this very reduced example, is the compiler required to evaluate the static_assert? #include <type_traits> template<typename T> auto foo(T t) -> void { ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

How does DISTINCT interact with ORDER BY?

Consider the two tables below: user: ID | name ---+-------- 1 | Alice 2 | Bob 3 | Charlie event: order | user ------+------------ 1 | 1 (Alice) 2 | 2 (Bob) 3 | 3 (Charlie) 4 | 3 ...
3
votes
0answers
66 views

Use of zero-width fields for bit-field alignment

In C it is possible to force a set of bit-fields to start on a new storage unit relative to their predecessors by specifying a zero-width bit field without a name, e.g. int field1:10; int :0; int ...
11
votes
4answers
840 views

Are iterators past the “one past-the-end” iterator undefined behavior?

Given int foo[] = {0, 1, 2, 3}; I want to know if iterators that point past the "one past-the-end" are invalid. For example: auto bar = cend(foo) + 1; There are a ton of complaints and warnings that ...
2
votes
1answer
25 views

Lower bound for the maximum level of ownership for recursive_mutex?

Quoting [thread.mutex.recursive]: A thread that owns a recursive_mutex object may acquire additional levels of ownership by calling lock() or try_lock() on that object. It is unspecified how many ...
7
votes
2answers
80 views

Proxy objects in iterators

I have a big vector of items that belong to a certain class. struct item { int class_id; //some other data... }; The same class_id can appear multiple times in the vector, and the vector is ...
11
votes
2answers
209 views

Events and multithreading once again

I'm worried about the correctness of the seemingly-standard pre-C#6 pattern for firing an event: EventHandler localCopy = SomeEvent; if (localCopy != null) localCopy(this, args); I've read Eric ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Is this deletion expected to destruct each array object?

Suppose I use a variation of using new to return a pointer to an array: class Type { /* ... */ }; typedef Type Type_42[1][42]; Type (*x)[42] = new Type_42; Since I used new to create, I use delete ...
5
votes
1answer
228 views

Why Does the Standard C++ Grammar Not Cover this Case?

I am mainly referring to the C++03 standard but, after a quick glance, it should also be applicable to the C++11 standard. The following code compiled and executed successfully in VC++2010: ...
2
votes
2answers
44 views

same-length same-signedness integer types in template parameters

When being used as template parameters, are integer types of the same length and the same signedness considered equal, i.e., do they produce the same template class when being used as a template ...
6
votes
1answer
92 views

const dependent names returned from template functions, where does const go?

Suppose that I have a template function (e.g., foo), that returns a const dependent type. The options to qualify the return type as const is to either put const at the left of typename keyword: ...
4
votes
1answer
126 views

Why is mutable specifier classified to be storage class specifier, but not a qualifier?

When the mutable specifier is used in the declaration of a non-static data member, the data is mutable no matter whether the rest of the object is treated as const. With this fact, we may easily have ...
6
votes
2answers
105 views

What is the lifetime of the target of pointer-to-function pointing to a lambda?

Sorry, it's a long-winded question, but let me break it down: Does the C++ standard guarantee that: void (*Ptr)(void) = [] {}; return Ptr; will still be defined behaviour? I understand that, for ...
8
votes
2answers
138 views

Volatile not working as expected

Consider this code: struct A{ volatile int x; A() : x(12){ } }; A foo(){ A ret; //Do stuff return ret; } int main() { A a; a.x = 13; a = foo(); } Using g++ -std=c++14 -pedantic ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

function template overload resolution with user defined conversion operator

What is the correct output for following code according to C++11 standard? #include <iostream> template <typename X> class A { public: A() { std::cout << "A::A" ...
6
votes
1answer
180 views

At which point does map::emplace create an object?

Is the point at which std::map::emplace creates the object (i.e. call the constructor) specified somehow in standard? If yes, does it happen before existence of such key is checked or after? It ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

How does std::string keep track of NUL char

C++11 guarantees that std::string stores the nul terminator internally. How can that be achieved without an explicit terminate method? Example: std::string foo("Baz"); printf("foo contains ...
20
votes
2answers
392 views

Inside of a class, why `auto b() -> decltype(a()) {}` works, but `decltype(a()) b() {}` does not?

Consider following code: (Ideone) struct S { int a() {return 0;} decltype(a()) b() {return 1;} }; It gives me following error: error: cannot call member function 'int S::a()' without ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Doubts about [dcl.spec]/3 in c++1z

[dcl.spec]/3 in c++1z (emphasis is mine): If a type-name is encountered while parsing a decl-specifier-seq, it is interpreted as part of the decl-specifier-seq if and only if there is no ...
5
votes
1answer
55 views

Argument-dependent lookup behaving unexpectedly on types aliased from another namespace

I just ran into some interesting behavior with argument-dependent lookup, which I do not fully understand: #include <iostream> namespace a { struct Foo { Foo(int v1, int v2) : v1(v1), v2(v2) ...
9
votes
2answers
182 views

Does an else if statement exist?

Some time ago after not standing anymore lines like this: if (arg) invk(test); else if (test) { alot(); stuff(); } I decided for my self its better for readability in our 1920x1200 ...
10
votes
1answer
123 views

May a random access iterator to end be incremented by zero?

The title says it all really. Given an iterator to end, may it be incremented by zero without invoking undefined behavior? Case in point - does the following code work to return an iterator to the ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Is the behavior of a functor created by std::bind well-defined when the bound object expires?

Is the behavior of the following code well defined? How does the f() call behave? #include <functional> #include <iostream> struct A { void shout() { std::cout <<"shout"; ...
17
votes
1answer
268 views

What is the order of destruction of function parameters?

This is a follow-up to my previous question What is the order of destruction of function arguments? because I accidentally confused arguments with parameters. Thanks to Columbo and T.C. for clearing ...
37
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the order of destruction of function arguments?

If some function f with parameters p_1, ..., p_n of types T_1, ..., T_n respectively is called with arguments a_1, ..., a_n and its body throws an exception, finishes or returns, in what order are the ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

equal_range and range for

While discussing multimap with my students, I noticed a small change that could cut out a bit of boilerplate, and was wondering if anyone had suggested it to the standard committee, and if so what the ...
10
votes
5answers
561 views

Unsigned and Signed Extension

Can someone explain the following code output to me: void myprint(unsigned long a) { printf("Input is %lx\n", a); } int main() { myprint(1 << 31); myprint(0x80000000); } output ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Do certain language features such as slicing, type erasure, copy elision, and return value optimization belong to a category under a specific name?

This has been bothering me for quite some time now. I would want to find a complete list on what these "idioms" are called. I've tried searching "C++ Idioms", but that doesn't include RVO, or copy ...
6
votes
4answers
131 views

Bit-shifting left and discarding bits

Let's consider the function (one of possible implementations of it) which would zero out right N bits of an unsigned short value (or any other unsigned integral type). The possible implementation ...