For questions about the intricacies of formal or authoritative specifications of programming languages and environments.

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3
votes
1answer
62 views

constexpr char array with GCC and clang

Consider the following code: #include <cstddef> #include <iostream> #include <stdexcept> class const_string { public: template <std::size_t sz> constexpr ...
0
votes
0answers
56 views

Trying to understand [class.qual]/2 in the C++14 Standard

[class.qual]/2: In a lookup in which function names are not ignored33 and the nested-name-specifier nominates a class C: if the name specified after the nested-name-specifier, when ...
2
votes
1answer
64 views

In what cases can functions or volatile accesses be presumed to return/finish for purposes of determining Undefined Behavior

Under modern interpretations of "Undefined Behavior", a compiler is entitled to assume that no chain of events which would cause undefined behavior to be "inevitable" will occur, and can eliminate ...
11
votes
2answers
75 views

Does upcasting a null pointer lead to undefined behavior

I'm wondering whether the following code leads to undefined behavior: #include <cstddef> #include <cstdio> struct IA { virtual ~IA() {} int a = 0; }; struct IB { virtual ~IB() {} ...
22
votes
2answers
551 views

GCC rejects a simple-declaration with an enum-base; clang accepts it — which is correct?

GCC 4.9.2 doesn't compile this snippet, but clang 3.5.0 does. Which one is correct? enum F : int { x, y, z}; int F; enum F:int f = F::x; GCC output : main.cpp:3:12: error: expected ';' or '{' ...
15
votes
3answers
455 views

Is it legal to call memcpy with zero length on a pointer just past the end of an array?

As answered elsewhere, calling functions like memcpy with invalid or NULL pointers is undefined behaviour, even if the length argument is zero. In the context of such a function, especially memcpy and ...
6
votes
1answer
133 views

Does C standard mandate that platforms must not define behaviors beyond those given in standard

The C standard makes clear that a compiler/library combination is allowed to do whatever it likes with the following code: int doubleFree(char *p) { int temp = *p; free(p); free(p); return ...
9
votes
2answers
52 views

Unclosed quote in a CSS block

This snippet is red on Firefox and blue on Chrome. Who is right? * { background: red; '} * { background: blue; } §4.1.6 Blocks says: Single (') and double quotes (") must also occur ...
31
votes
7answers
2k views

Is incrementing a null pointer well-defined?

There are lots of examples of undefined/unspecified behavior when doing pointer arithmetics - pointers have to point inside the same array (or one past the end), or inside the same object, ...
16
votes
1answer
137 views

Binding reference to an object before construction

Is the behavior of the following code well-defined? struct X { int i; }; // trivial struct Y : X { Y(){} }; // non-trivial extern X xobj; int& r1 = xobj.i; // #1 X xobj; extern Y yobj; Y& ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

Why is casting from int to void * allowed?

Why is casting from void* to int and vice versa allowed in C? Where is this used other than pthread?
4
votes
1answer
140 views

do pure virtual functions prevent implicitly generated move constructors?

#include <type_traits> struct test { virtual void foo() noexcept = 0; }; struct test2 : test { void foo() noexcept override final {} }; // fails ...
1
vote
1answer
13 views

Can the contents of a table cell overflow vertically?

A table cell may have content that overflows, as explained in in the fixed table layout: Any cell that has content that overflows uses the 'overflow' property to determine whether to clip the ...
-1
votes
2answers
53 views

C callbacks through the function pointer and without it. Why there is no difference?

I cannot understand why different code works as it will be identical. #include <stdio.h> void foo() { printf("Hello\n"); } void foo1(void fn()) { (*fn)(); fn(); } void foo2(void ...
4
votes
6answers
65 views

Does this avoid UB

This question is more of an academic one, seeing as there is no valid reason to write your own offsetof macro anymore. Nevertheless, I've seen this home-grown implementation pop-up here and there: ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

Is using std::time with std::srand valid code?

It is legal in C++ to write: std::srand(std::time(nullptr)); or does this yield undefined behaviour? std::time returns a std::time_t which is an arithmetic type, but other than that unspecified. ...
14
votes
3answers
174 views

Does the C++ standard require that dynamic initialization of static variables be performed in the main thread?

Does the C++ standard require that dynamic initialization of non-local static variables, be performed in the same thread that calls main()? More specifically, in C++11, is std::this_thread::get_id() ...
9
votes
4answers
120 views

Can a local variable have the same name as a namespace?

GCC, clang and VS2013 compile the snippet below: namespace A{} int main() { int A; } However [namespace.alias]/4 says the following: A namespace-name or namespace-alias shall not be ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Shouldn't standard specializations of std::atomic lack value constructor

The general version of the std::atomic template has a value constructor declared as constexpr atomic( T desired ); (See here) It is also said that bool, integral and pointer specializations of the ...
21
votes
1answer
361 views

Is a class with deleted copy-constructor trivially copyable?

Is this class: class A { public: A() = default; A(const A&) = delete; }; trivially copyable? (At least clang seems to think so (live)) In particular, would A a,b; ...
11
votes
1answer
282 views

Is std::abs(0u) ill-formed?

Given the following program: #include <cmath> int main() { std::abs(0u) ; } gcc and clang disagree on whether this is ill-formed. Using gcc with libstdc++ the code builds without error ...
13
votes
4answers
429 views

Is the term “method” defined by the C++ Standard?

The term "method" is often used to discuss C++ code. Does the standalone term have a well-defined meaning in C++ or is it ambiguous? Is it acceptable to use the term by itself, or should it be ...
8
votes
1answer
215 views

What's the purpose of function with only unspecified number of parameters?

In other words when function declared like this with 'T' being some type-alias: T (...) will be ever useful? If you don't know such declaration specifies a function with unknown number of ...
7
votes
1answer
171 views

Where in the Standard (C++14) does it say that the following two declarations are equivalent?

struct A{}; int A; struct A a; struct A::A b; The last two declarations above are equivalent.They both declare objects of type A. Where in the Standard can I find or deduce this?
0
votes
2answers
31 views

Defining a function and a variable in one declaration statement

I am pretty sure the following is legal int a, *b, c[5], d(char x); This defines an integer a, a pointer to int b, an array of 5 ints c, and declares a function d taking a char and returning int. ...
3
votes
2answers
48 views

Virtual base to derived cast of a non-polymorphic type

Base-to-derived conversion requires explicit cast though either static_cast or dynamic_cast. When the base is virtual, only the latter applies. Furthermore, dynamic_cast can only be used on ...
13
votes
2answers
227 views

Should the following code compile under Java 1.8

given the following class: public class FooTest { public static class Base { } public static class Derived extends Base { } public interface Service<T extends Base> { ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Details in the process of constructing a std::thread object

I'm interested in (and confused about) the details of constructing a std::thread object. According to cppreference, both the thread function and all arguments are value-copied to some ...
7
votes
1answer
93 views

Implicit synchronization when creating/joining threads

What is the minimal framing required for x's type for this code to work, considering the implied synchronization when creating/joining a thread: std::atomic? volatile? nothing? #include ...
96
votes
2answers
4k views

Program being compiled differently in 3 major C++ compilers. Which one is right?

As an interesting follow-up (not of big practical importance though) to my previous question: Why does C++ allow us to surround the variable name in parentheses when declaring a variable? I found out ...
6
votes
0answers
151 views

What replacements are available for formerly-widely-supported behaviors not defined by C standard

In the early days of C prior to standardization, implementations had a variety of ways of handling exceptional and semi-exceptional cases of various actions. Some of them would trigger traps which ...
23
votes
4answers
613 views

What does the C++ standard say about std::vector<int> v1,v2; std::distance(v1.begin(),v2.begin())?

I have this code #include <vector> #include <iostream> int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { std::vector<int> v1,v2; std::cout << std::distance(v1.begin(),v2.begin()); ...
4
votes
3answers
84 views

Initializer with constant expression having possible overflow in C99

Is this valid C99 code? If so, does it define an implementation-defined behavior? int a; unsigned long b[] = {(unsigned long)&a+1}; From my understanding of the C99 standard, from §6.6 in the ...
2
votes
4answers
68 views

Different C# Output Between Release and Debug

I've a little C# program here that produces different output between the Debug and Release versions. The empty output from the Release version is, I think, consistent with the C# Language ...
10
votes
0answers
102 views

Is this change in overload resolution between Clang 3.5 and 3.6 correct or a bug?

The code below compiles in Visual Studio 2013, gcc 4.8, clang 3.4 and clang 3.5 (Apple LLVM 6.0) but does not compile in clang 3.6 (via Apple LLVM 6.1) The code is a simplified version of a ...
8
votes
3answers
92 views

What is the behavior when a printf specifier flag is repeated?

fprintf() family of functions have 5 flag characters '-', '+', ' ', '#', '0'. What is the specified behavior, if any, when a flag is repeated? #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { printf("% ...
2
votes
2answers
55 views

converting iterator to pointer - especially at end()

I'm wondering if this is defined: vector<int> v; v.push_back(1337); int * p1 = &*vi.end(); (Update 1 If this is undefined, I'd like to know more about exactly where my error is. For ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

I'd like to see one example where the conversion-type-id is looked up in the context of the entire postfix-expression

In [basic.lookup.classref]/7 (C++14) we have (emphasis is mine): If the id-expression is a conversion-function-id, its conversion-type-id is first looked up in the class of the object expression ...
2
votes
3answers
96 views

Can I return pointer to VLA?

Is such function prototype valid in C? int (*func())[*]; And if it is, how can I define such functions?
1
vote
2answers
55 views

Forwarded in-place construction and list-initialization

By forwarded in-place construction, I take to mean std::allocator::construct and the various emplace methods, e.g., std::vector::emplace_back. I just find that forwarded in-place construction in C++ ...
8
votes
1answer
88 views

Issues concerning const decltype(x)&

Consider the following code: int a = 1; const int& b = a; std::cout << std::is_same<const decltype(b)&, const int&>(); It compiles on clang 3.5 while GCC 4.9 gives the ...
4
votes
4answers
126 views

Can a variable be used while being declared?

Why does the following compile without an error?: int main() { int x = x; //I thought this should cause an error return 0; } Where in the standards is it explained why this is allowed?
1
vote
3answers
71 views

Why don't pointer to VLA function parameters deduce their size automatically and is there currently any good usage of them?

As I understand it every VLA have an hidden variable of it's size which value can be 'acquired' by sizeof operator. What I don't get here is pointer to VLA's used in function parameters - why isn't ...
5
votes
0answers
205 views

Why isn't the “noexcept” specifier part of the function type?

I don't get it why? I don't think compatibility should be a problem as functions declared without the specifier actually have it implicitly defined to false. If it's about name mangling - can we just ...
7
votes
1answer
103 views

I need some help regarding §8/5 in the spec

§8/5: The optional attribute-specifier-seq in a trailing-return-type appertains to the indicated return type. The type-id in a trailing-return-type includes the longest possible sequence of ...
4
votes
2answers
78 views

Syntax for defining const array type

Be warned, I'm just interested in the possibility of C++ syntax, not in any practical use. It easy to define an array type. As an example, int a[3]; defines an array type of 3 int, while const int ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

The term `function declaration` is defined in §7/9 (N4140), but it isn't defined as a grammar production. Why?

In §7/9 you'll find the definition of a function declaration: If the decl-specifier-seq contains no typedef specifier, the declaration is called a function declaration if the type associated ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

Passing a dummy lock to std::condition_variable_any::wait

Suppose there are three threads A, B, and C. B and C suspend at a certain point, waiting for A to signal them to continue. Among the thread synchronization facilities provided by standard C++, ...
-4
votes
3answers
127 views

Legality of empty, unnamed enumeration specifier

In the example in §7.5 (C++14) one finds: enum {}; // ill-formed But, technically speaking, I think the code is valid.enum {} is an enum-specifier, and so, it's a type-specifier, which is a ...
5
votes
1answer
61 views

Trailing padding in internal structure

Compilers typically insert trailing padding on structures to satisfy alignment restrictions when they are used in arrays: // Size 4, alignment 2 struct A { uint16_t x; uint8_t y; // ...