For questions about the intricacies of formal or authoritative specifications of programming languages and environments.

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72
votes
3answers
7k views

When does invoking a member function on a null instance result in undefined behavior?

Consider the following code: #include <iostream> struct foo { void bar() { std::cout << "gman was here" << std::endl; } void baz() { x = 5; } int x; }; int main() { ...
38
votes
1answer
1k views

Has C++ standard changed with respect to the use of indeterminate values and undefined behavior in C++14?

As covered in Does initialization entail lvalue-to-rvalue conversion? Is int x = x; UB? the C++ standard has a surprising example in section 3.3.2 Point of declaration in which an int is initialized ...
43
votes
6answers
2k views

Accessing inactive union member - undefined?

I was under the impression that accessing an union member other than the last one set is UB, but I can't seem to find a solid reference (other than answers claiming it's UB but without any support ...
38
votes
5answers
1k views

Does initialization entail lvalue-to-rvalue conversion? Is `int x = x;` UB?

The C++ standard contains a semi-famous example of "surprising" name lookup in 3.3.2, "Point of declaration": int x = x; This initializes x with itself, which (being a primitive type) is ...
17
votes
2answers
11k views

Fortran: integer*4 vs integer(4) vs integer(kind=4)

I'm trying to learn Fortran and I'm seeing a lot of different definitions being passed around and I'm wondering if they're trying to accomplish the same thing. What is the difference between the ...
251
votes
15answers
13k views

int a[] = {1,2,}; Weird comma allowed. Any particular reason?

Maybe I am not from this planet, but it would seem to me that the following should be a syntax error: int a[] = {1,2,}; //extra comma in the end But it's not. I was surprised when this code ...
798
votes
6answers
67k views

C++11 introduced a standardized memory model. What does it mean? And how is it going to affect C++ programming?

C++11 introduced a standardized memory model, but what exactly does that mean? And how is it going to affect C++ programming? Herb Sutter says here that, The memory model means that C++ code ...
42
votes
5answers
5k views

Is `long` guaranteed to be at least 32 bits?

By my reading of the C++ Standard, I have always understood that the sizes of the integral fundamental types in C++ were as follows: sizeof(char) <= sizeof(short int) <= sizeof(int) <= ...
30
votes
1answer
3k views

Will std::string always be null-terminated in C++11?

In a 2008 post on his site, Herb Sutter states the following: There is an active proposal to tighten this up further in C++0x and require null-termination and possibly ban copy-on-write ...
22
votes
7answers
4k views

Why does left shift operation invoke Undefined Behaviour when the left side operand has negative value?

In C bitwise left shift operation invokes Undefined Behaviour when the left side operand has negative value. Relevant quote from ISO C99 (6.5.7/4) The result of E1 << E2 is E1 ...
13
votes
1answer
492 views

What is the value category of the operands of C++ operators when unspecified?

PREMISE: The C++11 Standard classifies expressions into three disjoint value categories: lvalues, xvalues, and prvalues (§ 3.10/1). An explanation of what value categories are is available for ...
130
votes
1answer
11k views

A positive lambda: '+[]{}' - What sorcery is this? [duplicate]

In Stack Overflow question Redefining lambdas not allowed in C++11, why?, a small program was given that does not compile: int main() { auto test = []{}; test = []{}; } The question was ...
38
votes
3answers
32k views

C++: null reference

Is this piece of code valid (and defined behavior)? int &nullReference = *(int*)0; Both g++ and clang++ compile it without any warning, even when using -Wall, -Wextra, -std=c++98, -pedantic, ...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

Where exactly does C++ standard say dereferencing an uninitialized pointer is undefined behavior?

So far I can't find how to deduce that the following: int* ptr; *ptr = 0; is undefined behavior. First of all, there's 5.3.1/1 that states that * means indirection which converts T* to T. But this ...
18
votes
1answer
566 views

Is it a conforming compiler extension to treat non-constexpr standard library functions as constexpr?

gcc compiles the following code without warning: #include <cmath> struct foo { static constexpr double a = std::cos(3.); static constexpr double c = std::exp(3.); static constexpr double ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Order of evaluation of arguments using std::cout

Hi all I stumbled upon this piece of code today and I am confused as to what exactly happens and more particular in what order : Code : #include <iostream> bool foo(double & m) { m ...
48
votes
5answers
3k views

Pure virtual functions may not have an inline definition. Why?

Pure virtual functions are those member functions that are virtual and have the pure-specifier ( = 0; ) Clause 10.4 paragraph 2 of C++03 tells us what an abstract class is and, as a side note, the ...
31
votes
3answers
3k views

casting via void* instead of using reinterpret_cast

I'm reading a book and I found that reinterpret_cast should not be used directly, but rather casting to void* in combination with static_cast: T1 * p1=... void *pv=p1; T2 * p2= ...
18
votes
4answers
1k views

Sequence points and partial order

A few days back there was a discussion here about whether the expression i = ++i + 1 invokes UB (Undefined Behavior) or not. Finally the conclusion was made that it invokes UB as the value of ...
18
votes
3answers
1k views

Aliasing `T*` with `char*` is allowed. Is it also allowed the other way around?

Note: This question has been renamed and reduced to make it more focused and readable. Most of the comments refer to the old text. According to the standard objects of different type may not share ...
19
votes
2answers
762 views

What is exactly the “immediate context” mentioned in the C++11 Standard for which SFINAE applies?

Paragraph 14.8.2/8 of the C++11 Standard specifies the conditions under which a substitution failure shall or shall not result in a "hard" compilation error (thereby causing compilation to fail) or in ...
10
votes
2answers
215 views

Defined behaviour for expressions

The C99 Standard says in $6.5.2. Between the previous and next sequence point an object shall have its stored value modified at most once by the evaluation of an expression. Furthermore, the ...
4
votes
1answer
310 views

Are multiple mutations of the same variable within initializer lists undefined behavior pre C++11

Consider the following code: int main() { int count = 0 ; int arrInt[2] = { count++, count++ } ; return 0 ; } If we compile the code using clang -std=c++03 it produces the following ...
40
votes
4answers
1k views

Do distinct functions have distinct addresses?

Consider these two functions: void foo() {} void bar() {} is it guaranteed that &foo != &bar? Similarly, template<class T> void foo() { } is it guaranteed that &foo<int> ...
39
votes
2answers
6k views

Is it guaranteed to be safe to perform memcpy(0,0,0)?

I am not so well-versed in the C standard, so please bear with me. I would like to know if it is guaranteed, by the standard, that memcpy(0,0,0) is safe. The only restriction I could find is that if ...
14
votes
3answers
548 views

Is a constexpr array necessarily odr-used when subscripted?

Given the following code: struct A { static constexpr int a[3] = {1,2,3}; }; int main () { int a = A::a[0]; int b [A::a[1]]; } is A::a necessarily odr-used in int a = A::a[0]? Note: This ...
36
votes
5answers
4k views

Repeated typedefs - invalid in C but valid in C++?

I would like a standard reference why the following code triggers a compliance warning in C (tested with gcc -pedantic; "typedef redefinition"), but is fine in C++ (g++ -pedantic): typedef struct Foo ...
17
votes
4answers
812 views

Is a moved-from vector always empty?

I know that generally the standard places few requirements on the values which have been moved from: N3485 17.6.5.15 [lib.types.movedfrom]/1: Objects of types defined in the C++ standard library ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

One-dimensional access to a multidimensional array: well-defined C?

I imagine we all agree that it is considered idiomatic C to access a true multidimensional array by dereferencing a (possibly offset) pointer to its first element in a one-dimensional fashion, e.g.: ...
6
votes
2answers
352 views

When instantiating a template, should members of its incomplete argument types be visible?

In the following example, A has a member typedef Instantiate which causes the instantiation of B<A>. template<typename T> struct B { typedef typename T::Before Before; // ok ...
246
votes
7answers
11k views

Can C++ code be valid in both C++03 and C++11 but do different things?

Is it possible for C++ code to conform to both the C++03 standard and the C++11 standard, but do different things depending on under which standard it is being compiled?
59
votes
2answers
2k views

When do extra parentheses have an effect, other than on operator precedence?

Parentheses in C++ are used in many places: e.g. in function calls and grouping expressions to override operator precedence. Apart from illegal extra parentheses (such as around function call argument ...
108
votes
9answers
3k views

Is it safe to push_back an element from the same vector?

vector<int> v; v.push_back(1); v.push_back(v[0]); If the second push_back causes a reallocation, the reference to the first integer in the vector will no longer be valid. So this isn't safe? ...
21
votes
3answers
1k views

Floating point comparison revisited

This topic has come up many times on StackOverflow, but I believe this is a new take. Yes, I have read Bruce Dawson's articles and What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point ...
41
votes
8answers
9k views

Efficient unsigned-to-signed cast avoiding implementation-defined behavior

I want to define a function that takes an unsigned int as argument and returns an int congruent modulo UINT_MAX+1 to the argument. A first attempt might look like this: int ...
34
votes
1answer
14k views

Using std::bind with member function, use object pointer or not for this argument?

When using std::bind to bind a member function, the first argument is the objects this pointer. However it works passing the object both as a pointer and not. See for example the following program: ...
22
votes
3answers
1k views

So why is i = ++i + 1 well-defined in C++11?

I've seen the other similar questions and read the defect about it. But I still don't get it. Why is i = ++i + 1 well-defined in C++11 when i = i++ + 1 is not? How does the standard make this well ...
17
votes
1answer
482 views

Can we apply content not explicitly cited from the normative references to the C++ standard?

In the C++11 standard(closest draft is N3337) section 1.2 Normative references says: The following referenced documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For dated ...
29
votes
3answers
1k views

In which versions of the C++ standard does “(i+=10)+=10” have undefined behaviour?

In C++, does the following have undefined behaviour: int i = 0; (i+=10)+=10; There was some debate about this in the comments to my answer to What's the result of += in C and C++? The subtlety ...
15
votes
1answer
958 views

Why is modifying a string through a retrieved pointer to its data not allowed?

In C++11, the characters of a std::string have to be stored contiguously, as § 21.4.1/5 points out: The char-like objects in a basic_string object shall be stored contiguously. That is, for any ...
15
votes
3answers
9k views

Use of typename keyword with typedef and new

Consider this code, template<class T> struct Sample { typename T::X *x; //declare pointer to T's X }; In the above code, the keyword typename is required by the compiler, so that it can ...
14
votes
1answer
877 views

Overload resolution with ref-qualifiers

While working with ref-qualified function overloads, I'm getting different results from GCC (4.8.1) and Clang (2.9 and trunk). Consider the following code: #include <iostream> #include ...
16
votes
2answers
582 views

Does the standard mandate an lvalue-to-rvalue conversion of the pointer variable when applying indirection?

TL;DR Given the following code: int* ptr; *ptr = 0; does *ptr require an lvalue-to-rvalue conversion of ptr before applying indirection? The standard covers the topic of lvalue-to-rvalue in many ...
8
votes
4answers
593 views

Legality of using operator delete on a pointer obtained from placement new

I'm dang certain that this code ought to be illegal, as it clearly won't work, but it seems to be allowed by the C++0x FCD. class X { /* ... */}; void* raw = malloc(sizeof (X)); X* p = new (raw) X(); ...
10
votes
3answers
338 views

Assignment operator sequencing in C11 expressions

Introduction The C11 standard (ISO/IEC 9899:2011) has introduced a new definition of side effect sequencing within an expression (see related question). The sequence point concept has been ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

What's the real reason to not use the EOF bit as our stream extraction condition?

Inspired by my previous question A common mistake for new C++ programmers is to read from a file with something along the lines of: std::ifstream file("foo.txt"); std::string line; while ...
20
votes
1answer
845 views

Is the size of std::array defined by standard

In C++11 std::array is defined to have contiguous storage and performance that is no worse than an array, but I can't decide if the various requirements of the standard imply that std::array has the ...
13
votes
4answers
597 views

Can SFINAE detect private access violations?

I wonder whether if i test for some member of a class and the member is private what will sfinae respond? Will it error out hard or will it say ok or will it error out in the sfinae way?
8
votes
3answers
932 views

Is left-shifting (<<) a negative integer undefined behavior in C++11?

Is left-shifting a negative int Undefined Behavior in C++11? The relevant Standard passages here are from 5.8: 2/The value of E1 << E2 is E1 left-shifted E2 bit positions; vacated bits ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

A comprehensive survey of the types of things in R. 'mode' and 'class' and 'typeof' are insufficient

The language R confuses me. Entities have modes and classes, but even this is insufficient to fully describe the entity. This answer says In R every 'object' has a mode and a class. So I did ...