4
votes
2answers
257 views

Why are JIT-ed languages still slower and less memory efficient than native C/C++?

Interpreters do a lot of extra work, so it is understandable that they end up significantly slower than native machine code. But languages such as C# or Java have JIT compilers, which supposedly ...
72
votes
2answers
2k views

int operators != and == when comparing to zero

I've found that != and == are not the fastest ways for testing for zero or non-zero. bool nonZero1 = integer != 0; xor eax, eax test ecx, ecx setne al bool nonZero2 = integer < 0 || integer > ...
7
votes
1answer
260 views

C++ - extremely strange machine code behaviour

The full code is here: http://pastebin.com/MM3vWmqA In the function fast_generator I've added comments to two statements. If you switch those statements, the code will run ~1.8x faster. If you remove ...
-1
votes
1answer
110 views

What switch statement produces the least efficient machine code?

I've got a question in one of my tests that asked me to answer what switch statement produce the least efficient machine code. The possible answers were O4, O1, O2, or O3. I don't event know what ...
11
votes
5answers
431 views

Why do compiled languages not perform equally if they eventually become machine code?

If C#, Java, or C++, for example, all compile to machine code, why are they not equally performant? My understanding is that such languages are an abstraction of machine code, which is what they all ...