A type of instruction that enforces ordering of a given set of operations.

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12
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2answers
711 views

Why isn't a C++11 acquire_release fence enough for Dekker synchronization?

The failure of Dekker-style synchronization is typically explained with reordering of instructions. I.e., if we write atomic_int X; atomic_int Y; int r1, r2; static void t1() { X.store(1, ...
0
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0answers
21 views

Are these definitions of acquire and realase fences incorrect?

In Joe Duffy's concurrent programming book he defines acquire and release fences like so: • Acquire fence. Ensures no load or store that comes after the fence will move befo re the fence. ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

C++ threading vs. visibility issues - what's the common engineering practice?

From my studies I know the concepts of starvation, deadlock, fairness and other concurrency issues. However, theory differs from practice, to an extent, and real engineering tasks often involve ...
0
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0answers
16 views

Regarding Flush and Shared Variable in openMP

I want to know when will the private view of shared variables in threads in openMP be written back to memory? Will it occur only at place where a flush( implicit or explicit) is executed or can they ...
2
votes
1answer
29 views

OpenMP flush and consistency of all threads

When some thread performs omp_set_lock, an implicit flush is performed. But does that mean that after the flush by this particular thread, all other threads will update their private view to value ...
12
votes
3answers
408 views

Do memory fences slow down all CPU cores?

Somewhere, one time I read about memory fences (barriers). It was said that memory fence causes cache synchronisation between several CPU cores. So my questions are: How does the OS (or CPU itself) ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

If we marked memory as WC(Write Combined), then do we have any consistency automatically?

As we know on x86 architecture the acquire-release consistency provided automatically - i.e. all operations automatically ordered without any fences, exclude first store and next load operations. (As ...
2
votes
2answers
51 views

Java equivalent to Thread.MemoryBarrier

In Java, how can I explicitly trigger a full memory fence/barrier, equal to the invocation of System.Threading.Thread.MemoryBarrier(); in C#? I know that since Java 5 reads and writes to volatile ...
3
votes
3answers
95 views

.Net CompareExchange reordering

Can the compiler or processor reorder the following instructions so that another Thread sees a == 0 and b == 1? Assuming int a = 0, b = 0; somewhere. ...
8
votes
3answers
524 views

The cost of atomic counters and spinlocks on x86(_64)

Preface I recently came across some synchronization problems, which led me to spinlocks and atomic counters. Then I was searching a bit more, how these work and found std::memory_order and memory ...
7
votes
1answer
89 views

pthreads v. SSE weak memory ordering

Do the Linux glibc pthread functions on x86_64 act as fences for weakly-ordered memory accesses? (pthread_mutex_lock/unlock are the exact functions I'm interested in). SSE2 provides some instructions ...
25
votes
2answers
788 views

Java 8 Unsafe: xxxFence() instructions

In Java 8 three memory barrier instructions were added to Unsafe class (source): /** * Ensures lack of reordering of loads before the fence * with loads or stores after the fence. */ void ...
18
votes
1answer
352 views

Cost of using final fields

We know that making fields final is usually a good idea as we gain thread-safety and immutability which makes the code easier to reason about. I'm curious if there's an associated performance cost. ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Why do I need a synchronization barrier?

I have two pthreads which are reading/writing to a shared memory location. In one thread I keep checking for update to memory location. (Linux, Glibc) Thread 1: while(1) { if (ptr) ...
8
votes
2answers
310 views

Where to places fences/memory barriers to guarantee a fresh read/committed writes?

Like many other people, I've always been confused by volatile reads/writes and fences. So now I'm trying to fully understand what these do. So, a volatile read is supposed to (1) exhibit ...
2
votes
2answers
54 views

Can a critical section indefinitely stall a processor?

So imagine I have code similar to the following: var obj = new object(); lock (obj) { while (true); } Since the loop will run forever, and since the loop is in a critical section: Will this ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

.Net memory visibility behavior

EDIT: I've finally written a complete article about the issue: Synchronization, memory visibility and leaky abstractions I'm demonstrating the importance of volatile read with this code: bool ok = ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

yet another topic about volatile

The question arises after reading some codes written by another developers, so I did some research and I found article by Andrei Alexandrescu. In his article he says that it is possible to use ...
8
votes
3answers
383 views

C11 memory fence usage

Even for a simple 2-thread communication example, I have difficulty to express this in the C11 atomic and memory_fence style to obtain proper memory ordering: shared data: volatile int flag, bucket; ...
0
votes
1answer
96 views

Why CPU registers act like roots for Garbage Collector?

Why CPU registers act like roots for Garbage Collector? When a mutator pauses, so the garbage collector can scan the roots, the variables contents are flushed to memory (using a memory fence) so the ...
26
votes
2answers
815 views

When is a compiler-only memory barrier (such as std::atomic_signal_fence) useful?

The notion of a compiler fence often comes up when I'm reading about memory models, barriers, ordering, atomics, etc., but normally it's in the context of also being paired with a CPU fence, as one ...
1
vote
0answers
175 views

Why is a memory barrier necessary between MONITOR and MWAIT?

Perusing the Linux x86 idle loop, I noticed a memory barrier in between monitor and mwait, and I can't figure out exactly why it's necessary. void mwait_idle_with_hints(unsigned long ax, unsigned ...
0
votes
3answers
710 views

Understanding atomic variables and operations

I read about boost's and std's (c++11) atomic type and operations over and over again and still I'm not sure I understand it right (and at some cases I don't understand it at all). So, I have a few ...
0
votes
2answers
185 views

Mutexes, atomic and fences : what offers the best tradeoff and portability ? C++11

I'm trying to get into something deeper to better understand how many options do I have when writing multi-threaded applications in C++ 11. In short I see this 3 options so far: mutexes with ...
0
votes
1answer
203 views

C++11 When To Use A Memory Fence?

I'm writing some threaded C++11 code, and I'm not totally sure on when I need to use a memory fence or something. So here is basically what I'm doing: class Worker { std::string arg1; int arg2; ...
1
vote
1answer
139 views

What is the (slight) difference on the relaxing atomic rules?

After seeing Herb Sutters excellent talk about "atomic weapons" I got a bit confused about the Relaxed Atomics examples. I took with me that an atomic in the C++ Memory Model (SC-DRF = Sequentially ...
18
votes
3answers
632 views

Is atomic decrementing more expensive than incrementing?

In his Blog Herb Sutter writes [...] because incrementing the smart pointer reference count can usually be optimized to be the same as an ordinary increment in an optimized shared_ptr ...
0
votes
1answer
208 views

Does this MMX mem copy code need a fence?

This basic mmx memory copy code corrupts memory in release mode, but only with certain compilers. Visual Studio 2010 in specific. I think it's because this code needs a memory fence, but I'm not ...
13
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between using explicit fences and std::atomic?

Assuming that aligned pointer loads and stores are naturally atomic on the target platform, what is the difference between this: // Case 1: Dumb pointer, manual fence int* ptr; // ... ...
3
votes
2answers
682 views

Memory barriers: How to ensure initialization writes are seen by worker threads?

I'm fairly new to programming with memory barriers/fences, and I was wondering how we can guarantee that setup writes are visible in worker functions subsequently run on other CPUs. For example, ...
1
vote
3answers
416 views

jni/java: thread safe publishing/sharing of effectively immutable native object

1) I have a native java function which passes several params and its implementation is a native C++ constructor to create an object and returns a long which is cast from the pointer to object. This ...
1
vote
1answer
402 views

Memory fencing at compiler level and hardware level

I read about memory fencing here... And I need a little clarification about it asm volatile ("" : : : "memory") This provides a compiler level memory fence and processor can still do reordering ...
2
votes
1answer
631 views

clarifications on full memory barriers involved by pthread mutexes

I have heard that when dealing with mutexes, the necessary memory barriers are handled by the pthread API itself. I would like to have more details on this matter. Are these claimings true, at least ...
0
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0answers
49 views

should I use memory fences in a supervisor-workers model?

I am building multithreading support for my application. In my application, it can happen that a worker should access the "work field" of another worker to complete its own job. I have tried to make ...
4
votes
1answer
862 views

std::call_once and memory reordering

Given the code from here: class lazy_init { mutable std::once_flag flag; mutable std::unique_ptr<expensive_data> data; void do_init() const { data.reset(new ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

using electric fence in a c++ program

I've been experimenting with Electric Fence lately and I can't figure out how to use it with c++ code. Here's an example: // test.cpp #include <cstdlib> ...
1
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3answers
234 views

Using a flag to communicate between threads

On the Internet, there can be found many debates about the use of volatile keyword in parallel programming, sometimes with contradictory argumentation. One of the more trustworthy discussion of this ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Do we need mfence when using xchg

I have a set and test xchg based assembly lock. my question is : Do we need to use memory fencing (mfence, sfence or lfence ) when using xchg instruction ? Edit : 64 Bit platform : with Intel ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Atomic access to shared memory

I have a shared memory between multiple processes that interpets the memory in a certain way. Ex: DataBlock { int counter; double value1; double ... } What I want is for the counter to be ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

In OpenCL, what does mem_fence() do, as opposed to barrier()?

Unlike barrier() (which I think I understand), mem_fence() does not affect all items in the work group. The OpenCL spec says (section 6.11.10), for mem_fence(): Orders loads and stores of a ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Out of Order Execution and Memory Fences

I know that modern CPUs can execute out of order, However they always retire the results in-order, as described by wikipedia. "Out of Oder processors fill these "slots" in time with other ...
9
votes
5answers
2k views

Are volatile reads and writes atomic on Windows+VisualC?

There are a couple of questions on this site asking whether using a volatile variable for atomic / multithreaded access is possible: See here, here, or here for example. Now, the C(++) standard ...
6
votes
1answer
593 views

What is the behavior of __faststorefence?

In regards to this question, I'm interested only in x86 and x86-64. For MSVC 2005, the documentation for __faststorefence says: "Guarantees that every preceding store is globally visible before any ...
3
votes
1answer
549 views

C++0x concurrent synchronizes, is the fence needed

I've recently asked a few questions about atomics and C++0x, and I'd like to ensure I understand the ordering semantics before I convert any code. Let's say we have this pre-0x code: atomic_int a = ...
6
votes
1answer
501 views

C++0X memory_order without fences, applications, chips that support

As a followup from my previous question, the atomic<T> class specifies most operations with a memory_order parameter. In contrast to a fence this memory order affects only the atomic on which it ...
11
votes
2answers
1k views

Fences in C++0x, guarantees just on atomics or memory in general

The C++0x draft has a notion of fences which seems very distinct from a CPU/chip level notion of fences, or say what the linux kernel guys expect of fences. The question is whether the draft really ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

volatile variable and atomic operations on Visual C++ x86

Plain load has acquire semantics on x86, plain store has release semantics, however compiler still can reorder instructions. While fences and locked instructions (locked xchg, locked cmpxchg) prevent ...
2
votes
3answers
948 views

sequentially-consistent atomic load on x86

I'm interested in sequentially-consistent load operation on x86. As far as I see from assembler listing, generated by compiler it is implemented as a plain load on x86, however plain loads as far as I ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Intel 64 and IA-32 | Atomic operations including acquire / release semantic

According to the Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer's Manual the LOCK Signal Prefix "ensures that the processor has exclusive use of any shared memory while the signal is asserted". ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

acquire-release pair out of order execution

I'm thinking of whether or not it is possible for atomic variable to load the old value in acquire-release pair. Let's suppose we have atomic variable x, and we store that variable with release ...