A type of instruction that enforces ordering of a given set of operations.

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18
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1answer
330 views

Cost of using final fields

We know that making fields final is usually a good idea as we gain thread-safety and immutability which makes the code easier to reason about. I'm curious if there's an associated performance cost. ...
23
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2answers
565 views

Java 8 Unsafe: xxxFence() instructions

In Java 8 three memory barrier instructions were added to Unsafe class (source): /** * Ensures lack of reordering of loads before the fence * with loads or stores after the fence. */ void ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Why do I need a synchronization barrier?

I have two pthreads which are reading/writing to a shared memory location. In one thread I keep checking for update to memory location. (Linux, Glibc) Thread 1: while(1) { if (ptr) ...
44
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4answers
12k views

What is a memory fence?

What is meant by using an explicit memory fence?
1
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1answer
85 views

.Net memory visibility behavior

EDIT: I've finally written a complete article about the issue: Synchronization, memory visibility and leaky abstractions I'm demonstrating the importance of volatile read with this code: bool ok = ...
1
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2answers
2k views

using electric fence in a c++ program

I've been experimenting with Electric Fence lately and I can't figure out how to use it with c++ code. Here's an example: // test.cpp #include <cstdlib> ...
6
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1answer
216 views

Where to places fences/memory barriers to guarantee a fresh read/committed writes?

Like many other people, I've always been confused by volatile reads/writes and fences. So now I'm trying to fully understand what these do. So, a volatile read is supposed to (1) exhibit ...
12
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3answers
2k views

What is the difference between using explicit fences and std::atomic?

Assuming that aligned pointer loads and stores are naturally atomic on the target platform, what is the difference between this: // Case 1: Dumb pointer, manual fence int* ptr; // ... ...
2
votes
2answers
50 views

Can a critical section indefinitely stall a processor?

So imagine I have code similar to the following: var obj = new object(); lock (obj) { while (true); } Since the loop will run forever, and since the loop is in a critical section: Will this ...
1
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2answers
82 views

yet another topic about volatile

The question arises after reading some codes written by another developers, so I did some research and I found article by Andrei Alexandrescu. In his article he says that it is possible to use ...
24
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2answers
626 views

When is a compiler-only memory barrier (such as std::atomic_signal_fence) useful?

The notion of a compiler fence often comes up when I'm reading about memory models, barriers, ordering, atomics, etc., but normally it's in the context of also being paired with a CPU fence, as one ...
2
votes
3answers
818 views

sequentially-consistent atomic load on x86

I'm interested in sequentially-consistent load operation on x86. As far as I see from assembler listing, generated by compiler it is implemented as a plain load on x86, however plain loads as far as I ...
8
votes
3answers
289 views

C11 memory fence usage

Even for a simple 2-thread communication example, I have difficulty to express this in the C11 atomic and memory_fence style to obtain proper memory ordering: shared data: volatile int flag, bucket; ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Why CPU registers act like roots for Garbage Collector?

Why CPU registers act like roots for Garbage Collector? When a mutator pauses, so the garbage collector can scan the roots, the variables contents are flushed to memory (using a memory fence) so the ...
0
votes
3answers
421 views

Understanding atomic variables and operations

I read about boost's and std's (c++11) atomic type and operations over and over again and still I'm not sure I understand it right (and at some cases I don't understand it at all). So, I have a few ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

In OpenCL, what does mem_fence() do, as opposed to barrier()?

Unlike barrier() (which I think I understand), mem_fence() does not affect all items in the work group. The OpenCL spec says (section 6.11.10), for mem_fence(): Orders loads and stores of a ...
1
vote
0answers
156 views

Why is a memory barrier necessary between MONITOR and MWAIT?

Perusing the Linux x86 idle loop, I noticed a memory barrier in between monitor and mwait, and I can't figure out exactly why it's necessary. void mwait_idle_with_hints(unsigned long ax, unsigned ...
18
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3answers
604 views

Is atomic decrementing more expensive than incrementing?

In his Blog Herb Sutter writes [...] because incrementing the smart pointer reference count can usually be optimized to be the same as an ordinary increment in an optimized shared_ptr ...
0
votes
2answers
157 views

Mutexes, atomic and fences : what offers the best tradeoff and portability ? C++11

I'm trying to get into something deeper to better understand how many options do I have when writing multi-threaded applications in C++ 11. In short I see this 3 options so far: mutexes with ...
0
votes
1answer
180 views

C++11 When To Use A Memory Fence?

I'm writing some threaded C++11 code, and I'm not totally sure on when I need to use a memory fence or something. So here is basically what I'm doing: class Worker { std::string arg1; int arg2; ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

What is the (slight) difference on the relaxing atomic rules?

After seeing Herb Sutters excellent talk about "atomic weapons" I got a bit confused about the Relaxed Atomics examples. I took with me that an atomic in the C++ Memory Model (SC-DRF = Sequentially ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Intel 64 and IA-32 | Atomic operations including acquire / release semantic

According to the Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer's Manual the LOCK Signal Prefix "ensures that the processor has exclusive use of any shared memory while the signal is asserted". ...
0
votes
1answer
179 views

Does this MMX mem copy code need a fence?

This basic mmx memory copy code corrupts memory in release mode, but only with certain compilers. Visual Studio 2010 in specific. I think it's because this code needs a memory fence, but I'm not ...
3
votes
2answers
621 views

Memory barriers: How to ensure initialization writes are seen by worker threads?

I'm fairly new to programming with memory barriers/fences, and I was wondering how we can guarantee that setup writes are visible in worker functions subsequently run on other CPUs. For example, ...
8
votes
4answers
638 views

Memory ordering issues

I'm experimenting with C++0x support and there is a problem, that I guess shouldn't be there. Either I don't understand the subject or gcc has a bug. I have the following code, initially x and y are ...
5
votes
1answer
528 views

What is the behavior of __faststorefence?

In regards to this question, I'm interested only in x86 and x86-64. For MSVC 2005, the documentation for __faststorefence says: "Guarantees that every preceding store is globally visible before any ...
1
vote
3answers
383 views

jni/java: thread safe publishing/sharing of effectively immutable native object

1) I have a native java function which passes several params and its implementation is a native C++ constructor to create an object and returns a long which is cast from the pointer to object. This ...
1
vote
1answer
320 views

Memory fencing at compiler level and hardware level

I read about memory fencing here... And I need a little clarification about it asm volatile ("" : : : "memory") This provides a compiler level memory fence and processor can still do reordering ...
1
vote
1answer
534 views

clarifications on full memory barriers involved by pthread mutexes

I have heard that when dealing with mutexes, the necessary memory barriers are handled by the pthread API itself. I would like to have more details on this matter. Are these claimings true, at least ...
0
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0answers
47 views

should I use memory fences in a supervisor-workers model?

I am building multithreading support for my application. In my application, it can happen that a worker should access the "work field" of another worker to complete its own job. I have tried to make ...
4
votes
1answer
776 views

std::call_once and memory reordering

Given the code from here: class lazy_init { mutable std::once_flag flag; mutable std::unique_ptr<expensive_data> data; void do_init() const { data.reset(new ...
1
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3answers
216 views

Using a flag to communicate between threads

On the Internet, there can be found many debates about the use of volatile keyword in parallel programming, sometimes with contradictory argumentation. One of the more trustworthy discussion of this ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Do we need mfence when using xchg

I have a set and test xchg based assembly lock. my question is : Do we need to use memory fencing (mfence, sfence or lfence ) when using xchg instruction ? Edit : 64 Bit platform : with Intel ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Atomic access to shared memory

I have a shared memory between multiple processes that interpets the memory in a certain way. Ex: DataBlock { int counter; double value1; double ... } What I want is for the counter to be ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Out of Order Execution and Memory Fences

I know that modern CPUs can execute out of order, However they always retire the results in-order, as described by wikipedia. "Out of Oder processors fill these "slots" in time with other ...
9
votes
5answers
2k views

Are volatile reads and writes atomic on Windows+VisualC?

There are a couple of questions on this site asking whether using a volatile variable for atomic / multithreaded access is possible: See here, here, or here for example. Now, the C(++) standard ...
3
votes
1answer
533 views

C++0x concurrent synchronizes, is the fence needed

I've recently asked a few questions about atomics and C++0x, and I'd like to ensure I understand the ordering semantics before I convert any code. Let's say we have this pre-0x code: atomic_int a = ...
6
votes
1answer
499 views

C++0X memory_order without fences, applications, chips that support

As a followup from my previous question, the atomic<T> class specifies most operations with a memory_order parameter. In contrast to a fence this memory order affects only the atomic on which it ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Fences in C++0x, guarantees just on atomics or memory in general

The C++0x draft has a notion of fences which seems very distinct from a CPU/chip level notion of fences, or say what the linux kernel guys expect of fences. The question is whether the draft really ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

volatile variable and atomic operations on Visual C++ x86

Plain load has acquire semantics on x86, plain store has release semantics, however compiler still can reorder instructions. While fences and locked instructions (locked xchg, locked cmpxchg) prevent ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

acquire-release pair out of order execution

I'm thinking of whether or not it is possible for atomic variable to load the old value in acquire-release pair. Let's suppose we have atomic variable x, and we store that variable with release ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

Memory Fences - Need help to understand

I'm reading Memory Barriers by Paul E. McKenney http://www.rdrop.com/users/paulmck/scalability/paper/whymb.2010.07.23a.pdf everything is explained in great details and when I see that everything is ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

.NET memory model, volatile variables, and test-and-set: what is guaranteed?

I know that the .NET memory model (on the .NET Framework; not compact/micro/silverlight/mono/xna/what-have-you) guaranteed that for certain types (most notably primitive integers and references) ...
1
vote
5answers
465 views

Atomic Instructions and Variable Update visibility

On most common platforms (the most important being x86; I understand that some platforms have extremely difficult memory models that provide almost no guarantees useful for multithreading, but I don't ...
4
votes
4answers
365 views

When do writes/reads affect main memory?

When I write a value into a field, what guarantees do I get regarding when the new value will be saved in the main memory? For example, how do I know that the processor don't keep the new value in ...