The pointfree (also called pointless) style of defining a function is to express it directly in terms of existing functions, without mentioning the arguments of the function being defined. Function composition and partial application are often used.

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How is this fibonacci-function memoized?

By what mechanism is this fibonacci-function memoized? fib = (map fib' [0..] !!) where fib' 1 = 1 fib' 2 = 1 ...
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What are advantages and disadvantages of “point free” style in functional programming?

I know that in some languages (Haskell?) the striving is to achieve point-free style, or to never explicitly refer to function arguments by name. This is a very difficult concept for me to master, ...
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What is point free style in Functional Programming?

A phrase that I've noticed recently is the concept of "point free" style... First, there was this question, and also this one. Then, I discovered here they mention "Another topic that may be worth ...
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What does (f .) . g mean in Haskell?

I have seen a lot of functions being defined according to the pattern (f .) . g. For example: countWhere = (length .) . filter duplicate = (concat .) . replicate concatMap = (concat .) . map What ...
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How can I understand “(.) . (.)”?

I believe I understand fmap . fmap for Functors, but on functions it's hurting my head for months now. I've seen that you can just apply the definition of (.) to (.) . (.), but I've forgot how to do ...
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How to use (->) instances of Monad and confusion about (->)

At different questions I've found hints in comments concerning using (->) instances of Monads e.g. for realizing point-free style. As for me, this is a little too abstract. Ok, I've seen Arrow ...
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In Haskell performing `and` and `or` for boolean functions

I just wrote the following two functions: fand :: (a -> Bool) -> (a -> Bool) -> a -> Bool fand f1 f2 x = (f1 x) && (f2 x) f_or :: (a -> Bool) -> (a -> Bool) -> a ...
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is point free code more efficient, or just terser?

I wrote the following code, which takes a bunch of points and draws them on the screen using the gloss library. let s = blocks pes pts = map (map mkPt) s {- stitches to points-} lines = map ...
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Current State of JavaScript Functional Programming Libraries [closed]

The Libraries Low Dash Underscore inspired, fixes lots of stuff apparently, great API Apparently it was so inspired by underscore that its also doing it wrong! fn.js Currently under 1.0 but great ...
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What is the derivation that shows Haskell's \x -> (x, x) equivalent to join (,)?

According to pointfree: \x -> (x, x) is equivalent to: join (,) What is the derivation that shows this?
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Applying multiple functions to the same value point-free style in Haskell

I was bored one day and wanted to exercise my brain, so I decided to do the 99 Haskell Problems but restricted myself to doing them in point-free style. A problem that seems to crop up a lot when I'm ...
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Help in understanding pointfree code

When playing around with Pointfree I was presented with a piece of code that I can't seem to understand. :pl map (\x -> x * x) [1..10] -- map (join (*)) [1..10] My main problem is that I don't ...
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Composing function composition: How does (.).(.) work?

(.) takes two functions that take one value and return a value: (.) :: (b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> a -> c Since (.) takes two arguments, I feel like (.).(.) should be invalid, but it's ...
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The case for point free style in Scala

This may seem really obvious to the FP cognoscenti here, but what is point free style in Scala good for? What would really sell me on the topic is an illustration that shows how point free style is ...
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Haskell map/zip Vs. list comprehension

Which of the following are you most likely to write? r = zip xs $ map sqrt xs or r = [(x, sqrt x) | x <- xs] Sample code on the Internet seems to indicate that the former is more abundant and ...
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Is there a better way to express the absolute error function in point-free notation?

In pointful notation: absoluteError x y = abs (x-y) An unclear example in pointfree notation: absoluteError' = curry (abs . uncurry (-))
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Trick for “reusing” arguments in Haskell?

From time to time I stumble over the problem that I want to express "please use the last argument twice", e.g. in order to write pointfree style or to avoid a lambda. E.g. sqr x = x * x could be ...
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Writing in pointfree style f x = g x x

I am learning Haskell. I'm sorry for asking a very basic question but I cant seem to find the answer. I have a function f defined by : f x = g x x where g is an already defined function of 2 ...
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Anyone ever flip (<$>)

I found defining the following (%) = flip fmap I can write code like the following: readFile "/etc/passwd" % lines % filter (not . null) to me it makes more sense then the alternative filter ...
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Point-free in Haskell

I have this code that I want to make point-free; (\k t -> chr $ a + flip mod 26 (ord k + ord t -2*a)) How do I do that? Also are there some general rules for point free style other than "think ...
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Haskell function composition operator of type (c→d) → (a→b→c) → (a→b→d)

Ordinary function composition is of the type (.) :: (b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> a -> c I figure this should generalize to types like: (.) :: (c -> d) -> (a -> b -> c) -> ...
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What is the equivalent to (+1) for the subtraction, since (-1) is seen as a negative number? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Currying subtraction I started my first haskell project that is not from a tutorial, and of course I stumble on the simplest things. I have the following code: moveUp ...
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Style vs Performance Using Vectors

Here's the code: {-# LANGUAGE FlexibleContexts #-} import Data.Int import qualified Data.Vector.Unboxed as U import qualified Data.Vector.Generic as V {-# NOINLINE f #-} -- Note the 'NO' --f :: ...
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Number of arguments and point-free in Haskell

With multiple pattern-matching, different numbers of arguments are impossible, even with point-free! foo True b = b + 2 foo _ = id doesn't work for example. But foo True = (+2) foo _ = id does. ...
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Point-free pattern matching possible in Haskell?

Given: data TwoInts = TwoInts Int Int add'em :: TwoInts -> Int add'em (TwoInts a b) = a+b is it possible to write add'em without having to name a and b. Something like: add'em TwoInts = ...
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How do I re-write a Haskell function of two argument to point-free style

I have the following function in Haskell agreeLen :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> Int agreeLen x y = length $ takeWhile (\(a,b) -> a == b) (zip x y) I'm trying to learn how to write ...
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Tacit function composition in Haskell

Say I have a mean function defined like so: mean xs = sum xs / (fromIntegral $ length xs) but I want it in some tacit form, like this: mean = sum / (fromIntegral . length) Is there a built-in ...
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Why does the pointfree version of this function look like this?

I've been playing around with Haskell a fair bit, including practising writing functions in point-free form. Here is an example function: dotProduct :: (Num a) => [a] -> [a] -> a dotProduct ...
12
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When to use pointless style?

Many haskell programmers, including me, like pointless style, especially when writing complicated parsers. They make code more readable and less verbose. But sometimes, it's just the other way round ...
11
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Is it possible to make pointfree functions more readable using different combinators than (.)?

What are potential alternative representations (e.g. using arrows, lenses, Haskell idioms, do syntax) of pointfree expressions that could read more like plain English? Here is trivial example: ...
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Functional composition with multi-valued functions in haskell?

I was wondering if it was possible to do functional composition with functions that take more than one argument. I want to be able to do something like this x = (+3).(*) setting x equal to a ...
10
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Where did bind come from?

Using lambdabot's pl plug-in, let iterate f x = x : iterate f (f x) in iterate is converted to fix ((ap (:) .) . ((.) =<<)) What does the (=<<) mean here? I thought that it is only ...
10
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Variadic compose function?

I'm trying to write a variadic function composition function. Which is basically the (.) except that the second argument function is variadic. This should allow expressions like: map even . zipWith ...
9
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simple Haskell functions in point-free style

I am trying to understand how to convert functions to point-free notation in Haskell. I saw this example, but it is more complicated than what I am looking for. I feel like I understand the logic ...
9
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Number of elements in Haskell in pointfree style

I want to define a function that computes the number of elements in a list that satisfy a given predicate: number_of_elements :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> Int number_of_elements f xs = ...
9
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A common pattern involving composition of functions (\a b -> f (g a) (g b))

The composition of f and g that looks like f :. g = \a b -> f (g a) (g b) is a pattern I find very often in my code. It is similar to unary function composition, only f is binary and I want g ...
9
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Performance Implications of Point-Free style

I’m taking my first baby-steps in learning functional programing using F# and I’ve just come across the Forward Pipe (|>) and Forward Composition (>>) operators. At first I thought they were just ...
9
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How to turn a Ruby method into a block?

Is there a way to simplify the following code? filenames is a list of filenames (strings), e.g. ["foo.txt", "bar.c", "baz.yaml"] filenames.map { |f| File.size(f) } Is there any way to turn ...
9
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Making numeric functions an instance of Num?

I want to be able to compose numeric functions in haskell using binary operators. So, for example, with unary numeric functions: f*g should translate to: \x -> (f x)*(g x) and similarly for ...
9
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Converting expression to pointfree style (Haskell)

I wrote this code and I have to rewrite it to the pointfree style: num_of_occ ele list = length(filter(==ele)list) So I did this: num_of_occ ele = length . filter((==)ele) It works. Than I did ...
9
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Concise syntax for partial in Clojure

Learning Haskell some time ago, I felt in love with pointfree notation and especially convenient partial function application - just supply args you know. In Clojure, I have partial all the time. I ...
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Point-free style and using $

How does one combine using $ and point-free style? A clear example is the following utility function: times :: Int -> [a] -> [a] times n xs = concat $ replicate n xs Just writing concat $ ...
8
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Pointfree (or library) function for applying two functions to single input

I keep reusing lambda expressions such as \x -> (f x, g x) where I apply the same input to two functions and encapsulate the result in a pair. I can write a function capturing this combine :: ...
8
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Is there a way to make h (f x) (g x) point-free in Haskell?

I want something like J's fork feature, I guess. Is there any way to do this?
8
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Haskell: Why is ((.).(.)) f g equal to f . g x?

Could you please explain the meaning of the expression ((.).(.))? As far as I know (.) has the type (b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> a -> c.
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Confusion about currying and point free style in Haskell

I was trying to implement the function every :: (a -> IO Bool) -> [a] -> IO Bool which was the topic for this question. I tried to do this without explicit recursion. I came up with the ...
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f1 = flip const map. How does this function work?

Let's say we have this point-free function: f1 = flip const map I'm clueless about how exactly does it work and what it is supposed to do? I.e. I know what map, const and flip functions are. But ...
8
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What is a general scheme for writing a function in pointfree style?

I am working through the 20 Intermediate Haskell Exercises at the moment, which is quite a fun exercise. It involves implementing various instances of the typeclasses Functor and Monad (and functions ...
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Pointfree function combination in Python

I have some predicates, e.g.: is_divisible_by_13 = lambda i: i % 13 == 0 is_palindrome = lambda x: str(x) == str(x)[::-1] and want to logically combine them as in: filter(lambda x: ...
8
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Function application: Why is $ used here?

A while ago, I asked a question about $, and got useful answers -- in fact, I thought I understood how to use it. It seems I was wrong :( This example shows up in a tutorial: instance Monad [] ...