POSIX is an acronym for Portable Operating System Interface, a set of standards defining programming APIs and utility behavior for Unix-like operating systems.

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1443
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Check if a directory exists in a shell script

What command can be used to check if a directory does or does not exist, within a shell script?
202
votes
8answers
54k views

I never really understood: what is POSIX?

What is POSIX? I read the Wikipedia article and I read it ever time I encounter the term. Fact is that I never really understood what it is. Can anyone please explain it to me by explaining "the need ...
175
votes
6answers
147k views

How to execute a command and get output of command within C++?

I am looking for a way to get the output of a command when it is run from within a C++ program. I have looked at using the system() function, but that will just execute a command. Here's an example ...
147
votes
4answers
48k views

When should I use mmap for file access?

POSIX environments provide at least two ways of accessing files. There's the standard system calls open(), read(), write(), and friends, but there's also the option of using mmap() to map the file ...
134
votes
3answers
95k views

How to kill all processes with a given partial name?

I want to kill all processes that I get by: ps aux | grep my_pattern How to do it? This does not work: pkill my_pattern
90
votes
3answers
104k views

Ubuntu Linux C++ error: undefined reference to 'clock_gettime' and 'clock_settime'

I am pretty new to Ubuntu, but I can't seem to get this to work. It works fine on my school computers and I don't know what I am not doing. I have checked usr/include and time.h is there just fine. ...
69
votes
3answers
31k views

How can I convert a file pointer ( FILE* fp ) to a file descriptor (int fd)?

I have a FILE *, returned by a call to fopen(). I need to get a file descriptor from it, to make calls like fsync(fd) on it. What's the function to get a file descriptor from a file pointer?
64
votes
6answers
24k views

What is the difference between sigaction and signal?

I was about to add an extra signal handler to an app we have here and I noticed that the author had used sigaction to set up the other signal handlers. I was going to use signal. To follow ...
59
votes
2answers
21k views

What does “#define _GNU_SOURCE” imply?

Today I had to use the basename() function, and the man 3 basename (here) gave me some strange message: Notes There are two different versions of basename() - the POSIX version described ...
58
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6answers
85k views

What is /dev/null 2>&1?

I found this piece of code in /etc/cron.daily/apf #!/bin/bash /etc/apf/apf -f >> /dev/null 2>&1 /etc/apf/apf -s >> /dev/null 2>&1 It's flushing and reloading the ...
55
votes
4answers
44k views

How can I catch a ctrl-c event? (C++)

How do I catch a ctrl-c event in C++?
55
votes
2answers
48k views

Bash test for empty string with X“” [duplicate]

I know I can test for an empty string in Bash with -z like so: if [[ -z $myvar ]]; then do_stuff; fi but I see a lot of code written like: if [[ X"" = X"$myvar" ]]; then do_stuff; fi Is that ...
55
votes
6answers
27k views

How does SIGINT relate to the other termination signals?

On POSIX systems, termination signals usually have the following order (according to many MAN pages and the POSIX Spec): SIGTERM - politely ask a process to terminate. It shall terminate gracefully, ...
54
votes
4answers
13k views

What is the status of POSIX asynchronous I/O (AIO)?

There are pages scattered around the web that describe POSIX AIO facilities in varying amounts of detail. None of them are terribly recent. It's not clear what, exactly, they're describing. For ...
43
votes
5answers
22k views

Why does SIGPIPE exist?

From my understanding, SIGPIPE can only occur as the result of a write(), which can (and does) return -1 and set errno to EPIPE... So why do we have the extra overhead of a signal? Every time I work ...
43
votes
6answers
18k views

How to construct a c++ fstream from a POSIX file descriptor?

I'm basically looking for a C++ version of fdopen(). I did a bit of research on this and it is one of those things that seems like it should be easy, but turns out to be very complicated. Am I ...
42
votes
6answers
36k views

Is there an equivalent to WinAPI's MAX_PATH under linux/unix?

If I want to allocate a char array (in C) that is guaranteed to be large enough to hold any valid absolute path+filename, how big does it need to be. On Win32, there is the MAX_PATH define. What is ...
40
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3answers
20k views

System V IPC vs POSIX IPC

What are the differences between System V IPC and POSIX IPC ? Why do we have two standards ? How to decide which IPC functions to use ?
37
votes
12answers
53k views

Recursive mkdir() system call on Unix

After reading the mkdir(2) man page for the Unix system call with that name, it appears that the call doesn't create intermediate directories in a path, only the last directory in the path. Is there ...
37
votes
15answers
6k views

What are some interesting C/C++ libraries to play around with?

I'm looking for a few new libraries and for C and C++. In the past most of the time I "accidently" stumbled across a few - and most of them found good use in projects I worked on. Libraries should ...
35
votes
10answers
18k views

Why does GCC-Windows depend on cygwin?

I'm not a C++ developer, but I've always been interested in compilers, and I'm interested in tinkering with some of the GCC stuff (particularly LLVM). On Windows, GCC requires a POSIX-emulation layer ...
34
votes
6answers
12k views

Is an atomic file rename (with overwrite) possible on Windows?

On POSIX systems rename(2) provides for an atomic rename operation, including overwriting of the destination file if it exists and if permissions allow. Is there any way to get the same semantics on ...
33
votes
11answers
15k views

What is the purpose of fork()?

In many programs and man pages of Linux, I have seen code using fork(). Why do we need to use fork() and what is its purpose?
33
votes
4answers
10k views

Getting the highest allocated file descriptor

Is there a portable way (POSIX) to get the highest allocated file descriptor number for the current process? I know that there's a nice way to get the number on AIX, for example, but I'm looking for ...
32
votes
7answers
7k views

How to detect if the current process is being run by GDB?

The standard way would be the following: if (ptrace(PTRACE_TRACEME, 0, NULL, 0) == -1) printf("traced!\n"); In this case ptrace returns an error if the current process is traced (i.e. running it ...
32
votes
1answer
9k views

Why does a read-only open of a named pipe block?

I've noticed a couple of oddities when dealing with named pipes (FIFOs) under various flavors of UNIX (Linux, FreeBSD and MacOS X) using Python. The first, and perhaps most annoying is that attempts ...
31
votes
3answers
13k views

How to get a FILE pointer from a file descriptor?

I'm playing around with mkstemp(), which provides a file descriptor, but I want to generate formatted output via fprintf(). Is there an easy way to transform the file descriptor provided by mkstemp() ...
31
votes
4answers
13k views

Is snprintf() ALWAYS null terminating?

Is snprintf always null terminating the destination buffer? In other words, is this sufficient: char dst[10]; snprintf(dst, sizeof (dst), "blah %s", somestr); or do you have to do like this, if ...
29
votes
3answers
13k views

Are message queues obsolete in linux?

I've been playing with message queues (System V, but POSIX should be ok too) in Linux recently and they seem perfect for my application, but after reading The Art of Unix Programming I'm not sure if ...
29
votes
3answers
2k views

Why did POSIX mandate CHAR_BIT==8?

There's a note in the POSIX rationale that mandating CHAR_BIT be 8 was a concession made that was necessary to maintain alignment with C99 without throwing out sockets/networking, but I've never seen ...
27
votes
11answers
32k views

Where are all my inodes being used?

How do I find out which directories are responsible for chewing up all my inodes? Ultimately the root directory will be responsible for the largest number of inodes, so I'm not sure exactly what sort ...
27
votes
3answers
12k views

Converting datetime to POSIX time

How do I convert a datetime or date object into a POSIX timestamp in python? There are methods to create a datetime object out of a timestamp, but I don't seem to find any obvious ways to do the ...
25
votes
12answers
39k views

Cron job to run on the last day of the month

I need to create a cron job that will run on the every last day of the month. I will create it from cpanel. Any help is appreciated. Thanks
25
votes
6answers
2k views

Forcing a spurious-wake up in Java

This question is not about, whether spurious wakeups actually happy, because this was already discussed in full length here: Do spurious wakeups actually happen? Therefore this is also not about, why ...
25
votes
2answers
6k views

difference bewteen C standard library and C POSIX library

I'm a little confused by C standard lib and C POSIX lib, because I found that, many header files defined in C POSIX lib are right in C standard lib. So, I assume that, C standard lib is a lib ...
24
votes
7answers
14k views

Linux and I/O completion ports?

Using winsock, you can configure sockets or seperate I/O operations to "overlap". This means that calls to perform I/O are returned immediately, while the actual operations are completed ...
24
votes
8answers
30k views

Is there a way to flush a POSIX socket?

Is there a standard call for flushing the transmit side of a POSIX socket all the way through to the remote end or does this need to be implemented as part of the user level protocol? I looked around ...
24
votes
2answers
6k views

What is the difference between ssize_t and ptrdiff_t?

The C standard (ISO/IEC 9899:2011 or 9899:1999) defines a type ptrdiff_t in <stddef.h>. The POSIX standard (ISO/IEC 9945; IEEE Std 1003.1-2008) defines a type ssize_t in <sys/types.h>. ...
23
votes
2answers
6k views

Linux: gcc with -std=c99 complains about not knowing struct timespec

When I try to compile this on Linux with gcc -std=c99, the compiler complains about not knowing struct timespec. However if I compile this without -std=c99 everything works fine. #include ...
23
votes
4answers
22k views

What does EAGAIN mean?

As in the title what does EAGAIN mean?
22
votes
8answers
62k views

Getting the current time in milliseconds

How do I get the current time on Linux in milliseconds?
22
votes
4answers
15k views

Distinguish Java threads and OS threads?

In Production system,like Banking application running in Linux environment, How do I distinguish running Java threads and native threads? In Linux there will be Parent process for every child ...
22
votes
1answer
13k views

File opening mode in Ruby

I am new programmar in Ruby. Can someone take an example about opening file with r+,w+,a+ mode in Ruby? What is difference between them and r,w,a? Please explain, and provide an example.
22
votes
7answers
13k views

How to be notified of file/directory change in C/C++, ideally using POSIX

The subject says it all - normally easy and cross platform way is to poll, intelligently. But every OS has some means to notify without polling. Is it possible in a reasonably cross platform way? (I ...
22
votes
4answers
10k views

Linux MMAP internals

I have several questions regarding the mmap implementation in Linux systems which don't seem to be very much documented: When mapping a file to memory using mmap, how would you handle prefetching the ...
22
votes
3answers
15k views

Setting thread priority in Linux with Boost

The Boost Libraries don't seem to have a device for setting a thread's priority. Would this be the best code to use on Linux or is there a better method? boost::thread myThread( MyFunction() ); ...
21
votes
10answers
21k views

What's the easiest way to get a user's full name on a Linux/POSIX system?

I could grep through /etc/passwd but that seems onerous. 'finger' isn't installed and I'd like to avoid that dependency. This is for a program so it would be nice if there was some command that let ...
21
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4answers
20k views

How are the O_SYNC and O_DIRECT flags in open(2) different/alike?

The use and effects of the O_SYNC and O_DIRECT flags is very confusing and appears to vary somewhat among platforms. From the Linux man page (see an example here), O_DIRECT provides synchronous I/O, ...
21
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2answers
778 views

What are the WONTFIX bugs on GNU/Linux and how to work around them? [closed]

Both Linux and the GNU userspace (glibc) seem to have a number of "WONTFIX" bugs, i.e. bugs which the responsible parties have declared their unwillingness to fix despite clearly violating the ...
21
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4answers
353 views

Why does \$ reduce to $ inside backquotes [though not inside $(…)]?

Going over the POSIX standard, I came across another rather technical/pointless question. It states: Within the backquoted style of command substitution, <backslash> shall retain its literal ...