How does Python work underneath the hood? Use for questions relating to (for instance) the design decisions made and the internal data structures and algorithms used.

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5
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1answer
34 views

Why do generator expressions and dict/set comprehensions in Python 2 use a nested function unlike list comprehensions?

List comprehensions have their code placed directly in the function where they are used, like this: >>> dis.dis((lambda: [a for b in c])) 1 0 BUILD_LIST 0 ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Which operations can be done in parallel without grabbing the GIL?

I'm looking at embedding Python in a multi-threaded C++ program and doing simple computations using numpy in parallel. On other words, I'm using PyRun_SimpleString to call numpy functions. Is ...
26
votes
2answers
960 views

What is under the hood of x = 'y' 'z' in Python?

If you run x = 'y' 'z' in Python, you get x set to 'yz', which means that some kind of string concatenation is occurring when Python sees multiple strings next to each other. But what kind of ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Get different results in Sublime Text and terminal when I run python code?

I am learning Core Python and doing an exercise: 4-9. Given the following assignments: a = 10 b = 10 c = 100 d = 100 e = 10.0 f = 10.0 What is the output of each of the ...
3
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2answers
68 views

Why does a class' body get executed at definition time?

In contrast to functions, a class' body is executed at definition time: class A(object): print 'hello' Out: hello Why is it the case? Is it related to @classmethod / @staticmethod methods ...
11
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1answer
137 views

Why does a class definition always produce the same bytecode?

Say I do: #!/usr/bin/env python # encoding: utf-8 class A(object): pass Now I disassemble it: python -m dis test0.py 4 0 LOAD_CONST 0 ('A') 3 ...
82
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1answer
3k views

Why does tuple(set([1,“a”,“b”,“c”,“z”,“f”])) == tuple(set([“a”,“b”,“c”,“z”,“f”,1])) 85% of the time with hash randomization enabled?

Given Zero Piraeus' answer to another question, we have that x = tuple(set([1, "a", "b", "c", "z", "f"])) y = tuple(set(["a", "b", "c", "z", "f", 1])) print(x == y) Prints True about 85% of the ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

How to get reference count of a PyObject?

How to get reference count of a PyObject from C++? There are functions Py_INCREF and Py_DECREF which increase/decrease it, but I haven't found any function which return object's reference count. I ...
0
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1answer
56 views

How is unicode represented internally in Python?

How is Unicode string literally represented in Python's memory ? For example I could visualize 'abc' as its ASCII bytes in Memory . Integer could be thought of as 2's compliment representation . ...
4
votes
1answer
54 views

What is the priority of importing a name, submodule or subpackage from a package in python 2.7?

In the official Python 2 tutorial it says: Note that when using from a_package import an_item, the item can be either a submodule (or subpackage) of the package, or some other name defined in the ...
0
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1answer
63 views

How do CPython and PyPy decide when to resize a set?

When adding elements to sets on CPython and PyPy, when are they resized, and what will be the sizes of the underlying container? This question is similar in principle to max_load_factor, as C++ ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

What are __signature__ and __text_signature__ used for in Python 3.4

If one does dir() on some builtin callables (class constructors, methods, etc) on CPython 3.4, one finds out that many of them often have a special attribute called __text_signature__, for example: ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Static initialization with pointer to extern variable

I would like to understand the innards of the Python import system, including the rough spots. In the Python C API documentation, there's this terse reference to one such rough spot: This is so ...
6
votes
1answer
144 views

How does python do string magic? [duplicate]

I was confused today by a string comparison: it seems python reuses strings (which is a sensible thing to do, since they are immutable). To check this fact I did the following: >>> a = 'xxx' ...
8
votes
1answer
162 views

How does module loading work in CPython?

How does module loading work in CPython under the hood? Especially, how does the dynamic loading of extensions written in C work? Where can I learn about this? I find the source code itself rather ...
32
votes
1answer
954 views

Where is Python's shutdown procedure documented?

CPython has a strange behaviour where it sets modules to None during shutdown. This screws up error logging during shutdown of some multithreading code I've written. I can't find any documentation of ...
0
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0answers
63 views

How python interpreter decide id number? [duplicate]

I learned that id(1) always same because of interning mechanism. >>> id(1) 14710976 >>> id(1) 14710976 >>> 5 >>> id(1) 14710976 >>> But when i try ...
2
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2answers
40 views

Python Method object creation

Python's class instance objects have attributes.Those attributes can be data attributes or methods. Lets take for example this class class Foo: def bar(self): print("FooBar") And lets ...
2
votes
1answer
26 views

What does the term bootstrap refer to in Python Multiprocessing.Process Module?

Playing with the Process and Pool modules in the Multiprocessing package and keep coming across references to the the _bootstrap method. From what I'm seeing the method imports a multiprocessing ...
9
votes
1answer
372 views

Why is variable1 += variable2 much faster than variable1 = variable1 + variable2?

I have inherited some Python code which is used to create huge tables (of up to 19 columns wide by 5000 rows). It took nine seconds for the table to be drawn on the screen. I noticed that each row was ...
2
votes
2answers
94 views

What is the stack in Python?

What do we call "stack" in Python? Is it the C stack of CPython? I read that Python stackframes are allocated in a heap. But I thought the goal of a stack was... to stack stackframes. What does the ...
13
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1answer
392 views

Tuple or list when using 'in' in an 'if' clause?

Which approach is better? Using a tuple, like: if number in (1, 2): or a list, like: if number in [1, 2]: Which one is recommended for such uses and why (both logical and performance wise)?
3
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1answer
94 views

Is there an usage `_tuple` in python?

I read the official documentation for collections.namedtuple today and found _tuple mentioned in the __new__ method. I did not find where the _tuple defined. Here is the code, you can try it in ...
4
votes
1answer
44 views

Why is iter not a method of an instance and __iter__ is? [duplicate]

The "intuitive" way of getting an iterator for someone who usually programs in Java, C++, etc is something like list.iterator(). Why did the Python folks choose to have it as a general function like ...
6
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4answers
151 views

Does Python's 'in' operator for lists have an early-out for successful searches

If i have a list then i look up a element in list by: alist=[ele1, ele2, ele3, ele4,ele5,...] if ele3 in alist: print "found" Will in stop a search from alist at ele3 ? Or it will run though all ...
3
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1answer
83 views

Python: the __getattribute__ method and descriptors

according to this guide on python descriptors https://docs.python.org/2/howto/descriptor.html method objects in new style classes are implemented using descriptors in order to avoid special casing ...
7
votes
3answers
152 views

Using a function defined in an exec'ed string in Python 3 [duplicate]

Why does the following python3 code produces an error? a=''' def x(): print(42) ''' class Test: def __init__(self): exec(a) x() t = Test() Results in this message: ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Where builtin functions are implemented

I tried to look around but I couldn't find anything clear about this topic. Are built-in functions implemented in a module that is automatically imported every time Python is launched? In the case ...
68
votes
6answers
4k views

Why can I use the same name for iterator and sequence in a Python for loop?

This is more of a conceptual question. I recently saw a piece of code in Python (it worked in 2.7, and it might also have been run in 2.5 as well) in which a for loop used the same name for both the ...
46
votes
2answers
2k views

Very strange behavior of operator 'is' with methods

Why is the first result False, should it not be True? >>> from collections import OrderedDict >>> OrderedDict.__repr__ is OrderedDict.__repr__ False >>> dict.__repr__ is ...
6
votes
4answers
288 views

About the changing id of a Python immutable string

Something about the id of objects of type str (in python 2.7) puzzles me. The str type is immutable, so I would expect that once it is created, it will always have the same id. I believe I don't ...
3
votes
1answer
55 views

tuple identity when calling tuple on a tuple

I was hypothesizing that tuple(tuple_instance) should (as an optimization) be able to return the input tuple without making a copy. It turns out that on CPython this appears to be the case: ...
0
votes
2answers
73 views

difference between python set and dict “internally”

Can anybody tell me how the internal implementation of set and dict is different in python? Do they use the same data structure in the background? ++ In theory, one can use dict to achieve set ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

What is the difference between type.__getattribute__ and object.__getattribute__?

Given: In [37]: class A: ....: f = 1 ....: In [38]: class B(A): ....: pass ....: In [39]: getattr(B, 'f') Out[39]: 1 Okay, that either calls super or crawls the mro? In [40]: ...
6
votes
1answer
131 views

In Python, what is the difference between f.readlines() and list(f)

From both Python2 Tutorial and Python3 Tutorial, there is a line in the midpoint of section 7.2.1 saying: If you want to read all the lines of a file in a list you can also use list(f) or ...
22
votes
1answer
529 views

Argument Unpacking wastes Stack Frames

When a function is called by unpacking arguments, it seems to increase the recursion depth twice. I would like to know why this happens. Normally: depth = 0 def f(): global depth depth += 1 ...
112
votes
4answers
11k views

Why is it slower to iterate over a small string than a small list?

I was playing around with timeit and noticed that doing a simple list comprehension over a small string took longer than doing the same operation on a list of small single character strings. Any ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

Best way to import modules in Python

Is there a performance disadvantage when importing all module functions into the namespace at once, as in: from numpy import * A = array([...]) compared to only importing the module function when ...
0
votes
3answers
45 views

local variable optimization in python method

In the following code, I would like to know if the grade_to_score dictionary will be created every time the method is called? def get_score(grade): grade_to_score = {'A': 10, 'B': 8, 'C': 6, ...
2
votes
3answers
83 views

Why there is no difference between shallow copy and deep copy for a list of immutables

Suppose i have a python list l consisting of immutables.When i am doing a shallow copy and a deep copy, the result is same: >>> a = (1,2) # immutable types >>> b = (3,4) ...
2
votes
1answer
128 views

Why can't I use inspect.getsource() to view the source for list?

I tried to retrieve the source code for the list class using the inspect module, without success: >>> import inspect >>> inspect.getsource(list) Traceback (most recent call last): ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

Do attribute names consume memory on instance basis in python

Considering I have millions of objects with 3 __slots__ Is it more memory efficient to have short slot names like x vs. long like would_you_like_fries_with_that_cheeseburger? Or are the names ...
4
votes
1answer
159 views

What makes lists unhashable?

So lists are unhashable: >>> { [1,2]:3 } TypeError: unhashable type: 'list' The following page gives an explanation: A list is a mutable type, and cannot be used as a key in a ...
16
votes
1answer
528 views

What is the meaning of “<” for Python dictionaries?

I've noticed that Python lets me do this: >>> {1: "foo"} < {2: "bar"} True It lets me do the same thing for lists, deques, etc. What are the semantics of < when applied to ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

When does CPython garbage collect?

If my understanding is correct, in CPython objects will be deleted as soon as their reference count reaches zero. If you have reference cycles that become unreachable that logic will not work, but on ...
5
votes
1answer
81 views

Why is it possible to use more than 2 ^ 16 constants in a Python function?

In internal modules like peephole, argument of LOAD_CONST is stored in the two bytes following the opcode. For example, the macro it uses to get argument of an operation is implemented as: #define ...
4
votes
1answer
72 views

Why is integer divisions not optimised when compiling to bytecode?

First, let me show a experiment I do: In [69]: dis.dis(lambda : 4 / 2 + 1.5 * 2 + (4 - 2)) 1 0 LOAD_CONST 1 (4) 3 LOAD_CONST 2 (2) ...
16
votes
2answers
910 views

Why do ints require three times as much memory in Python?

On a 64-bit system an integer in Python takes 24 bytes. This is 3 times the memory that would be needed in e.g. C for a 64-bit integer. Now, I know this is because Python integers are objects. But ...
11
votes
1answer
221 views

Why is 10 / float(98765) 3.5x slower than 10 / (98765* 1.0)

I understand that this could be argued as a non-issue, but I write software for HPC environments, so this 3.5x speed increase actually makes a difference. In [1]: %timeit 10 / float(98765) ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

safe usage of remove method in python

I inherited a UserList class from list and implemented the following method to remove entries which are marked deleted def purge_deleted(self): for element in list.__iter__(self): if ...