Resource Acquisition Is Initialization (RAII) is a common idiom used in C++ to manage the lifetime of resources, including memory allocations, file handles or database connections. In brief, every resource should be wrapped in an owning class, whose lifetime controls the lifetime of the resource. ...

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3
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5answers
73 views

When to use an object in a vector and when to use a pointer to an object in a vector? [on hold]

When you instantiate objects and store them in a vector. What are the pros and cons between these three and in which instance should these be used? Object: std::vector<obj> collection; ...
3
votes
2answers
77 views

Segmentation Fault and RAII

It's more a philosophical type of question. In C++ we have nice shiny idiom - RAII. But often I see it as incomplete. It does not well aligns with the fact that my application can be killed with ...
22
votes
4answers
1k views

Why do C++ standard file streams not follow RAII conventions more closely?

Why do C++ Standard Library streams use open()/close() semantics decoupled from object lifetime? Closing on destruction might still technically make the classes RAII, but acquisition/release ...
4
votes
2answers
143 views

Is it possibe to write/wrap the exception handling componets(try,catch) in different class?

This is about wrapping the exception handling logic in some sort of class. While writing c++ code, many time we need to catch many type/variants of exception depending on what client throw. This lead ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

How to deal with bad_alloc in RAII?

The code is as follows: class A; shared_ptr<A> aPtr(new A()); //do something with aPtr. If new throws a bad_alloc exception, what happend to the smart point aPtr? Do I need to do some check ...
3
votes
2answers
57 views

How to correctly dispose potentially ofphaned classes in case of exceptions?

I've just recently started using the full ruleset of Code Analysis in a few of our projects. One of the warnings that really made me think more carefully about IDisposable classes is the CA2000. I've ...
3
votes
1answer
79 views

what is the relation between RAII and shared_ptr?

I understood the concept of RAII (Resource acquisition is initialization). It basically says that resources should be reclaimed in destructor to avoid any memory leaks. But I didn't understand how ...
0
votes
0answers
54 views

Why destructor is not called when object goes out of scope [duplicate]

Following program C++ compiled using g++ -O0 a.cpp -std=c++98: class A { public: A(const A& a) { cout << "A copy" << endl; } A() { cout << "A" << endl; } ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

Deterministic destruction of container-owned objects (or how to put a Unique (std.typecons.Unique) into a D Phobos container)?

I'm trying to instantiate a container full of Unique resources, in an attempt to ensure that when the container is destroyed, all items managed (owned) by the container are also destroyed, ...
1
vote
4answers
99 views

Getting a line number from where a function returned

I have a cpp function which has multiple return points based on different flags set and different control flows. Is there a way to figure which return statement was used, without adding a line of ...
6
votes
2answers
242 views

RAII and deduced template arguments

Here's an issue I often run into with RAII. I was wondering if anyone had a good solution for it. Start with your standard RAII utility class: class RAIIHelper { RAIIHelper() { ...
5
votes
2answers
117 views

Possible to detect stack allocated object that isn't captured?

Is it possible to prevent or detect the following bug, in any way (static analysis), where the stack allocated object is not captured and goes out of scope on the same line that it was constructed? ...
7
votes
5answers
266 views

One-liner for RAII on non pointer?

Related topic std::unique_ptr, deleters and the Win32 API To use a Win32 Handle as a RAII, I can use the following line std::unique_ptr<std::remove_pointer<HANDLE>::type, ...
-3
votes
1answer
72 views

in C++ does RAII always allocate objects on the stack or does it ever use the heap?

I'm wondering if RAII always allocates on the stack, or if the compiler ever uses the heap for large objects (and then perhaps adds a token to the stack as a sort of reminder of when to destroy the ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Best way to implement RAII idiom in c#

I have a class which manipulates a resource which is shared by multiple threads. The threads pass around control of a mutex in order to manage access to the resource. I would like to manage control ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

ScopeGuard usage with multiple resourace allocatons and exit points in a fucntion

I have multiple resources allocated in a function, therefore quite a few pointers and out of which I have to return one pointer (let's say ret_ptr) and deallocate others (all othr_ptrs) before leaving ...
2
votes
3answers
102 views

Assignment within RAII scope

Problem How do you initialize an object inside a RAII scope, and use it outside of that scope? Background I have a global lock which can be called with lock() and unlock(). I have a type, ...
1
vote
3answers
53 views

Why are the fields of the class automatic objects?

During my studing exeption's mechanism I found that there are calls of destructors for fields of the object while stack's unwinding. Let me explain explicitly: class X { File_ptr aa; Lock_ptr bb; ...
-1
votes
1answer
76 views

How does RAII work in Video Games (with regards to objects with undefined lifetimes)? [closed]

RAII is great, it calls the deconstructors for your objects automagically when they exit scope and this works just dandy for a lot of objects, but how exactly does this work in video games? In games, ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Structure deference not working?

Why isn't the following valid? bool trigger(t_evt evt) const { std::shared_ptr<I> ptr = this->instance.lock(); if (!ptr) { return false; } (ptr->*f)(evt); // ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

How can we deal with shared/weak ptr without making the code huge?

I'm trying to figure out what can be achieved with intelligent pointers. But there something that feels like a hindrance. A normal pointer has a short definition Someclass *p but intelligent pointers ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Resource release via a _local_ RAII object [duplicate]

I could be totally off in my understanding of the use of RAII class to ensure resources are released, but the following example appears to show that a local object of a RAII class need not be able to ...
2
votes
3answers
83 views

How to clean up a a failed constructor

Let's say I am writing a class which wraps up a C style API. int cstyleInit() int cstyleCleanup() In general, the approach would be to put cstyleInit() in my constructor and cstyleCleanup() in the ...
1
vote
2answers
103 views

Read a file using C++ and RAII

What's the best way to read a file in using C++ and RAII? All the examples I've seen use something similar to the code below: #include <iostream> #include <fstream> int main () { ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

c++ RAII destructor exception

As far as I understand RAII refers to acquire resources in ctor and release them in dtor. Ctor acquires some resources and can fail, resulting in an exception. Dtor releases the resources and can ...
5
votes
4answers
163 views

RAII can not really guarantee to prevent resource leak, can it?

Pardon me if this question is too silly. The most common example of usefulness of using RAII is : void func(){ // create some object pointer using any smart pointer // do some operation that may ...
3
votes
1answer
63 views

RAII and unit testing principles

The RAII (Resource Acquisition Is Initialization) is one of the suggested ways of constructing objects. How does it relate to the unit testing principles that are saying: no complex job done in the ...
5
votes
1answer
177 views

Is it safe to use placement new on 'this' pointer

Current Implementation I have a class containing unique_ptr fields which depend on one other: class ResourceManager { ResourceManager() {} ResourceManager(A* a_ptr) : b_ptr(new B(a)), ...
2
votes
3answers
199 views

How can I keep const-correctness and RAII?

I have situation similar to included: class A { public: A(shared_ptr<B>); } class B : public enable_shared_from_this<B> { const shared_ptr<A> a; } I can't have ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

RAII or 'finally' emulation in bash

I'm looking for best practice for emulating RAII or 'finally' in a function in bash. Using the trap mechanism is acceptable, but then it must all happen in a subshell. I am looking for ways to be ...
7
votes
4answers
520 views

Why C++ primitive types are not initialized like the rest of types?

I know that, in C++, when you write int i; you can not make any assumptions about the value that the variable will hold until you effectively assign it a value. However, if you write int i = ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

More complex cleanup in C++

I'm well aware of the RAII pattern and std::unique_ptr and other "smart pointers" in C++11, but there's still some cases which I can't figure out how to handle nicely without having a goto Cleanup ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

C++ object destroyed more than once

When writing some code that loads a (part of) a datastructure into graphics memory, I was surprised by this unexpected behaviour. I've simplified the code to the following: #include <iostream> ...
2
votes
3answers
95 views

Is there any RAII file handle already implemented?

A RAII file handle looks pretty basic so I guess it has already been implemented? But I couldn't find any implementation. I found file_descriptor in boost::iostreams but I don't know if it's what I'm ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

What's the proper way to handle an RAII member variable?

I'm new to C++ and don't yet fully understand the RAII pattern. I'm writing a class which uses an sqlite database via SQLiteC++. Here is some sample code that uses the database that works: void ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

How to Implement the Builder pattern using Resource Acquisition Is Initialization?

I have an object created from a builder. After doing some stuff I have to delete it. But the code will not be reached if an, exception is thrown { cClass* cc = MyBuilder.build(); // do something ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

call function when leaving scope

What is the most elegant solution for calling a function automatically when leaving a scope? My current approach (see below) works but I guess there should be something more general as writing a ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

How should I wrap C libraries into C++

Typical C libraries look like this: foo_t * foo_open(); int foo_query( foo_t * ); int foo_close( foo_t * ); I can see two ways of wrapping those into sleak RAII structures. I could either ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

non-type parameter depends on arguments that come after it

I'm writing a templated class that encapsulates win32 handles RAII. This is what I've got so far: #define NOMINMAX #include <Windows.h> #include <functional> // problem: optionally pass ...
0
votes
2answers
68 views

C++ Using RAII with Polymorphism and Stack Allocation [closed]

I have been researching into RAII (http://tomdalling.com/blog/software-design/resource-acquisition-is-initialisation-raii-explained/) and have a number of questions! There are some strong arguments ...
1
vote
3answers
37 views

How to delete object automatically without exporting them

I develop a library that provides various APIs for clients. We have multiple restrictions and one of them is that we should avoid exporting classes as much as possible. This is a problem on some ...
0
votes
2answers
241 views

Scoped mutex lock

I never really worked with mutexes before, but i need to control access to protected resources. Looking through the new C++11 stuff, i cooked up this class: class CMutex { public: class Lockable ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

RAII understanding - Accesing methods of a bounded pointer

I was reading about the RAII concept and while attempting to understand it , I formulated the following example. class foo_handler { private: foo* f; public: foo_handler(foo* inc) : f(inc){} ...
3
votes
3answers
263 views

how can I design a RAII file descriptor without creating a new int

I want to create a RAII wrapper around a file descriptor. As the object might be passed around threads, it really is a shared resource: this is why I made a first implementation by using a shared_ptr ...
1
vote
3answers
112 views

Appending onto QList<QFile*>

I was wondering why when you make a QList of QFIle you must make them pointers. For example I have a class that has a QList< QFile* >: class Files { public: void AddFile(QString newFile); ...
19
votes
4answers
986 views

Stroustrup's RAII and the cast operator FILE* () = contradiction?

I was reading through Stroustrup’s C++ (3ed, 1997) to see how he implemented the RAII, and on page 365 I found this: class File_ptr{ FILE* p; public: File_ptr(const char* n, const char* a){p ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Design reason behind setupUi()

I'd like to know why, in your opinion, Qt engineers decided to put the setupUi() method in every generated form. (for those who do not know how Qt works: setupUi() is a method which allocates in ...
3
votes
1answer
117 views

Do boost asio sockets have proper RAII cleanup

I tried looking through source but I cant navigate that much of a template code. Basically: this is what documentation says (for close()): Remarks For portable behaviour with respect to ...
2
votes
1answer
516 views

Why cleanup attribute of GCC/Clang can not be used with function parameter

Despite the cleanup attribute is an extension that supported by GCC/Clang only, I think it s the nearest approximation to RAII in pure C. e.g. #define loc_str __attribute__((cleanup(free_loc_str))) ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Memory leaks when extending class

I have a class that implements a Trie, created using the RAII spirit, and there is a way of using it that leaks memory, I don't understand why. Class code: template <typename T,typename C,int ...