The rule of three (also known as the Law of The Big Three or The Big Three) is a rule of thumb in C++ that claims that if a class defines one of the following it should probably explicitly define all three: destructor, copy constructor, assignment operator

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C++ - For a vector of pointers to an object, does reallocation cause deletion and copying of objects?

From my understanding so far, if you have a vector of class objects, if you erase any member of the vector, typically the vector will reallocate some of it's objects in order to preserve memory ...
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Passing a class which holds Dynamic Memory : Methods and their Efficiencies

I have a class that holds some big amount of data, called HeavyData. This class Follows the rule of three (It has overridden the copy-constructor, copy-assignment operator and the destructor to be ...
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Class members garbled after copy-construction or copy by assignment (sometimes)

My class NRRanNormal represents a normally-distributed random variable. By default, instances are normally distributed with mean 0 and stdev 1 (i.e., a standard normal random variable). Sometimes ...
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C++ : copy-and-swap idiom, alternative constructor

NB: This question follows a previous one, I hope it is okay to still ask it as a new question. I am trying to implement the "three and a half big rule" (copy-and-swap idiom) for a tree class, which ...
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Regarding the rule of three [closed]

My question regards the rule of 3- For those unfarmiliar if one has a very basic class like the following: int Type; foo::foo(int type) { Type=type; } why should one create a destructor? ...
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Are there any static analysis tools that check for Rule of 3 (or Rule of 5 C++11)

I am currently working on a codebase that is built on a foundation of sand. There are numerous classes in supposedly tested libraries that violate the "Rule of 3". Most declare a non-trivial ...
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C++ Template Errors with different types

I need to find all the possible, at least three, errors from the following. template<typename A, typename B, typename C> C myfunction(const A& a, const B& b) { if ( a < b ) ...
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Rule of Three. Copy Constructor, Assignment Operator Implementation [closed]

Rule of Three. Copy Constructor, Assignment Operator Implementation #include <iostream> using namespace std; class IntPart { public: IntPart(); // default constructor IntPart(int n); ...
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Memory Management : character arrays and = operator

Memory Management : character arrays and = operator Q. In terms of Memory Management, What error would you have with the following code? class String { public: String(const char right[]); ...
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C++ Destructors , dynamic allocation

I have recently had some errors (bad_alloc) due to my lack of a destructor. I currently have two classes, set up in this way: class ObjOne { friend class ObjTwo; public: ...
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Exception to the Rule of Three?

I've read a lot about the C++ Rule of Three. Many people swear by it. But when the rule is stated, it almost always includes a word like "usually," "likely," or "probably," indicating that there are ...
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Default constructor missing - but I'm not calling it?

I'm writing a C++ application in which I have a Controller class with two nested structs, defined in my header file as follows: class Controller { struct help_message { // controller.hpp, line ...
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vector does not erase content correctly (infite amount run of copy asignment operator untill crash [BEX])?

Well my problem is that after I want to "unload" loaded DLL's the copy assignmnent operator is called an unlimited amount of times until crash. The code from which I remove the vector data looks like ...
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Understanding -Weffc++

Consider the following program: #include <string> struct S { S (){} private: void *ptr = nullptr; std::string str = ""; }; int main(){} This, when compiled with -Weffc++ on GCC ...
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Rule of Three in C++

I've read that The Rule of Three, What is The Rule of Three? is summarized as follows: If you need to explicitly declare either the destructor, copy constructor or copy assignment operator ...
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Am I violating Rule of three?

I recently read, Rule of three and am wondering if I am violating it? In my GUI application, classes like MainFrame, Interface, Circuit, Breadboard etc. (class name are indicative) have a single ...
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Why is a non-default constructor NOT considered in the Rule of Three?

The rule of three (also known as the Law of The Big Three or The Big Three) is a rule of thumb in C++ that claims that if a class defines one of the following it should probably explicitly define all ...
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3answers
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Safe assignment and copy-and-swap idiom

I'm learning c++ and I recently learned (here in stack overflow) about the copy-and-swap idiom and I have a few questions about it. So, suppose I have the following class using a copy-and-swap idiom, ...
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Can anyone please give me an example of how to properly use “The Big Three” in C++? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is The Rule of Three? Hi, I've been reading about the topic, and many websites tell me about why do I need a ctor, copy ctor, and a dtor. But I have had trouble ...
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c++ inheritance question

I have a question about this: class A { int a; int* pa; public: A(int i):a(i) , pa(new int(a)) { cout<<"A ctor"<<a<<endl; } ~A() { delete pa; ...
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Rule-of-Three becomes Rule-of-Five with C++11?

So, after watching this wonderful lecture on rvalue references, I thought that every class would benefit of such a "move constructor", template<class T> MyClass(T&& other) edit and of ...
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When assigning in C++, does the object we assigned over get destructed?

Does the following code fragment leak? If not, where do the two objects which are constructed in foobar() get destructed? class B { int* mpI; public: B() { mpI = new int; } ~B() { delete ...
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What is The Rule of Three?

What does copying an object mean? What are the copy constructor and the copy assignment operator? When do I need to declare them myself? How can I prevent my objects from being copied?
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C++ Copy Constructor + Pointer Object

I'm trying to learn "big three" in C++.. I managed to do very simple program for "big three".. but I'm not sure how to use the object pointer.. The following is my first attempt. I have a doubt when ...
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Storing objects in STL vector - minimal set of methods

What is "minimal framework" (necessary methods) of complex object (with explicitly malloced internal data), which I want to store in STL container, e.g. <vector>? For my assumptions (example of ...
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Unusual destructor behaviour when copying over stack variables

I wrote a test to check whether destructors were called before an overwriting assignment on a stack variable, and I can't find any rational explanation for the results... This is my test (in Visual ...