The rule of three (also known as the Law of The Big Three or The Big Three) is a rule of thumb in C++ that claims that if a class defines one of the following it should probably explicitly define all three: destructor, copy constructor, assignment operator

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What is The Rule of Three?

What does copying an object mean? What are the copy constructor and the copy assignment operator? When do I need to declare them myself? How can I prevent my objects from being copied?
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Rule-of-Three becomes Rule-of-Five with C++11?

So, after watching this wonderful lecture on rvalue references, I thought that every class would benefit of such a "move constructor", template<class T> MyClass(T&& other) edit and of ...
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Exception to the Rule of Three?

I've read a lot about the C++ Rule of Three. Many people swear by it. But when the rule is stated, it almost always includes a word like "usually," "likely," or "probably," indicating that there are ...
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C++ Copy Constructor + Pointer Object

I'm trying to learn "big three" in C++.. I managed to do very simple program for "big three".. but I'm not sure how to use the object pointer.. The following is my first attempt. I have a doubt when ...
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Understanding -Weffc++

Consider the following program: #include <string> struct S { S (){} private: void *ptr = nullptr; std::string str = ""; }; int main(){} This, when compiled with -Weffc++ on GCC ...
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Rule of Three in C++

I've read that The Rule of Three, What is The Rule of Three? is summarized as follows: If you need to explicitly declare either the destructor, copy constructor or copy assignment operator ...