3
votes
1answer
52 views

Why does Erlang give up on producing a stack trace in the presence of higher order functions?

Erlang produces nice stack traces when something goes wrong, this is helpful when a programmer wants to figure out why it went wrong. In the presence of higher order functions however the mechanism to ...
1
vote
1answer
102 views

Lazy Evaluation and Strict Evaluation Haskell

I understand what lazy evaluation is, and how it works and the advantages it has, but could you explain me what strict evaluation really is in Haskell? I can't seem to find much info about it, since ...
3
votes
0answers
185 views

avoiding stack overflow in binary tree construction

as a part of learning haskell i decided to write a binary tree. as far as i understand, if i sequence a large set of insertions and deletions i can easily reach a stack overflow when i finally start ...
7
votes
2answers
479 views

Haskell - strict vs non-strict with foldl

I have a question concerning the definition of strict vs non-strict. The Haskell wiki-book for Laziness (http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Laziness), under the section "Black-box strictness ...
11
votes
5answers
667 views

Time cost of Haskell `seq` operator

This FAQ says that The seq operator is seq :: a -> b -> b x seq y will evaluate x, enough to check that it is not bottom, then discard the result and evaluate y. This might not seem ...
0
votes
1answer
184 views

Is there a functional representation for strict evaluation?

I want to implement the strict folding functions myself, from within Haskell: Is this possible? I've read that Lisp macros can be used to redefine the language to a massive extent, giving you the ...
11
votes
4answers
3k views

Convert a Lazy ByteString to a strict ByteString

I have a function that takes a lazy ByteString, that I wish to have return lists of strict ByteStrings (the laziness should be transferred to the list type of the output). import qualified ...