The number-sign or "stringizing" operator (#) converts macro parameters to string literals without expanding the parameter definition.

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string concatenation inside macro

To print several fields of a struct, I have to say the following line repeatedly: cout << "field1=" << ptr->get_field1() So I defined the following macro, and use it like this: ...
2
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1answer
126 views

Unspecified evaluation order of stringize operators

Unary operators are typically parsed with higher precedence than binary operators, and when scanning left-to-right a prefix operator will be found first. So why is the order of evaluation of stringize ...
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3answers
795 views

error when defining a stringising macro with __VA_ARGS__

I have been trying to implement a function macro in C that prepends "DEBUG: ", to the argument, and passes its arguments to printf: #define DBG(format, ...) printf("DEBUG: " #format "\n", ...
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362 views

Stringize operator failure

The C and C++ standards all include text to the effect that if a stringize operation fails to produce a valid string literal token, the behavior is undefined. In C++11 this is actually possible, by ...
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1answer
82 views

is it possible to write a c++ function that stringizes?

How would you go if you had to write a proper C++ function that does the same as the operator '#' in macros? It would be useful if it were possible to do it at runtime.
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161 views

Convert member variable name to a string

Can I enumerate char* members of a class (or struct) in C++? If so can I print the variables names as strings? Using pre-processor? I have a class with all const char* members. It would be good if ...
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variable name as a string data member

In C++ is it possible to declare a class which has a private std::string data member which is initialized with the stringized / stringified name of the instance symbol name? I can see that this ...
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2answers
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c preprocessor: stringize macro and identity macro

I want to know the reason behind the output of this code. I couldn't come up with an answer. #define f(a,b) a##b #define g(a) #a #define h(a) g(a) void main() { printf("%s ...
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How, exactly, does the double-stringize trick work?

At least some C preprocessors let you stringize the value of a macro, rather than its name, by passing it through one function-like macro to another that stringizes it: #define STR1(x) #x #define ...