Successor arithmetics, in Prolog also known as s(X)-notation or s(X)-numbers, is an encoding of the natural numbers based on Peano Axioms. Zero is represented by `0`, one is represented as the successor of zero `s(0)`, two as the successor of one `s(s(0))` etc.

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9
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967 views

Prolog successor notation yields incomplete result and infinite loop

I start to learn Prolog and first learnt about the successor notation. And this is where I find out about writing Peano axioms in Prolog. See page 12 of the PDF: sum(0, M, M). sum(s(N), M, s(K)) :- ...
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1answer
240 views

What are the optimal green cuts for successor arithmetics sum?

To grok green cuts in Prolog I am trying to add them to the standard definition of sum in successor arithmetics (see predicate plus in What's the SLD tree for this query?). The idea is to "clean up" ...
3
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3answers
666 views

What's the SLD tree for this query?

Let's consider the following Prolog program (from "The Art of Prolog"): natural_number(0). natural_number(s(X)) :- natural_number(X). plus(X, 0, X) :- natural_number(X). plus(X, s(Y), s(Z)) :- ...
3
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2answers
559 views

Prolog predicate - infinite loop

I need to create a Prolog predicate for power of 2, with the natural numbers. Natural numbers are: 0, s(0), s(s(0)) ans so on.. For example: ?- pow2(s(0),P). P = s(s(0)); false. ?- pow2(P,s(s(0))). ...
3
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2answers
632 views

Convert peano number s(N) to integer in Prolog

I came across this natural number evalutation of logical numbers in a tutorial and it's been giving me some headache: natural_number(0). natural_number(s(N)) :- natural_number(N). The rule roughly ...
4
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3answers
1k views

What does the s() predicate do in Prolog?

I have been trying to learn Prolog, and am totally stumped on what the predicate s() does. I see it used often and there is so little resources on the internet about Prolog that I cannot find an ...
3
votes
2answers
320 views

How does prolog run through recursive queries using succ?

Can someone explain to me why this prolog query works the way it does. The definition is: add(0,Y,Y). add(succ(X),Y,succ(Z)):- add(X,Y,Z). Given this: ?- add(succ(succ(succ(0))), succ(succ(0)), ...
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600 views

Too much backtracking: why is there a “redo” here?

I'm doing a very simple exercise in Prolog and there's something I don't understand in the trace. The program is a "greater than" (>) on integers represented as successors: greater_than(succ(_), ...