5
votes
3answers
42 views

Terminology for relationships defined by interfaces

If inheritance is the OO technique for implementing an is-a relationship and composition/aggregation implements a has-a relationship what would would the appropriate name for the relationship ...
1
vote
4answers
188 views

How to understand the meaning of “Contract”

I always see the word contract and it seems to have different meanings or at least it is how it looks to me (I am not a native English speaker) so when I see the word "contract" I cannot be sure what ...
4
votes
4answers
110 views

Is there a term which interchangeably describes either an Interface or an Abstract Class in C#?

What is the correct term to describe a type which may be either an interface or an abstract, but is not a concrete type? This question arises as a result of wiring up StructureMap as an ...
-3
votes
1answer
69 views

What is the most common, unambiguous term for “inheritability”

What is the most general term that can be used to describe the "inheritability" of a class or class member? I basically want to know what general way I can ask, "What is this class or ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

What is SUT and where did it come from?

I see many people talking about the term SUT, but do not understand why they use that term. SUT is what you want to test? Where does this term come from and what does it mean? For example in this ...
11
votes
10answers
237 views

What is the technically correct term for an instance of class which implements IEnumerable?

Do we call such an instance a "collection"? An "enumerable"? Or something else? I ask with my two main goals being: To be understood by other developers, without having to explain that the class ...
3
votes
2answers
698 views

What is a non-jargon definition for WMI?

I have been reading a bit about WMI, and trying to get a handle on what it is, but it all seems like a lot of jargon and circular definitions. Here: Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) is the ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Terminology: event raised with parameters?

I am only not sure if one can say that event has parameters. E.g. KeyDown event. Should I say that it was raised with two parameters? What is the terminology here? EDIT:I am trying to find out ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

C# variable initializations vs assignment

In a book I found following (translation): Initialization means assigning the value of the variable at the declaration time. int X=5 is called an initialization command. EDIT: It just says that ...
9
votes
3answers
493 views

“Formatter” and “Serializer” - any difference between the terms?

Some things in .NET are called "formatters" - BinaryFormatter, SoapFormatter. Others are called "serializers" - XmlSerializer, DataContractSerializer. Why the difference?
9
votes
1answer
599 views

Are events raised, triggered, or fired?

In a German programming forum we currently have a discussion about events and what you (grammatically) do with them. The MSDN talks about "Event Raising" and "to raise an event". Thus, this seems to ...
4
votes
7answers
1k views

What is a Value Class and what is a reference Class in C#?

What is the definition of a value class and reference class in C#? How does this differ from a value type and reference type? I ask this question because I read this in the MCTS Self-Paced Training ...
0
votes
4answers
258 views

What is the offical terminology for the basic .NET objects in C#

What is the official term for the basic object types available in the C#? I am creating API documentation and I need to explain any that one property of my API will accept any basic C# object ...
17
votes
4answers
10k views

BCL (Base Class Library) vs FCL (Framework Class Library)

What's the difference between the two? Can we use them interchangeably?
6
votes
9answers
329 views

Terminology - can events be “thrown”?

Twice this week, I've read people write that an event (.net) was "thrown". I've always thought that the verb to use with events is either "fire" or "raise". I thought that "thrown" was used for ...
3
votes
2answers
946 views

What is the difference between an Interop and a RCW (Runtime Callable Wrapper)?

What is the difference between an Interop and a RCW (Runtime Callable Wrapper)? Is it just terminology?