19
votes
6answers
2k views

What do you call the data wrapped inside a monad?

In speech and writing, I keep wanting to refer to the data inside a monad, but I don't know what to call it. For example, in Scala, the argument to the function passed to flatMap gets bound ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Functional Terminology: Mapping (SIMD) vs ??? (MISD)

Given that map normally means to apply a given function (f(x)) across lots of values ([a,b,c,d]) (analogous to Single Instruction Multiple Data architectures), the opposite could be a single value (a) ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Computer science map and exclude

I have an array with some values: [1, 2, 3, 4] I'd like to make a new array that contains mapped version of the items in the array above, but only add them to the new array if they pass a truth ...
51
votes
4answers
5k views

What constitutes a fold for types other than list?

Consider a single-linked list. It looks something like data List x = Node x (List x) | End It is natural to define a folding function such as reduce :: (x -> y -> y) -> y -> List x ...
10
votes
4answers
2k views

Any difference between First Class Function and High Order Function

I'm wondering whether/what difference between First Class Function and High Order Function. I read through those two wiki pages and they looks rather similar. If they talking about same, why need ...
3
votes
1answer
95 views

Is there a term for a function whose sole purpose is to ignore one or more of its parameters?

Let's say that an API I'm using requires a callback function that takes two parameters, apple and banana. An example in CoffeeScript: example = (apple, banana) -> [...] The function I want to ...
9
votes
2answers
346 views

ADT names. What is `Left a`, and then what is `a`, in Haskell?

If I have a Haskell ADT such as: data Foo = A Int Double | B Bool [Integer] | C (Maybe String) Float the A, B, and C are referred to as data constructors; and sometimes as value constructors. ...
0
votes
2answers
115 views

What functional programming terminology distinguishes between avoding modifying variables and objects?

In functional programming, what terminology is used to distinguish between avoiding modifying what a variable refers to, and avoiding modifying an object itself? For example, in Ruby, name += title ...
45
votes
6answers
3k views

What do “reify” and “reification” mean in the context of (functional?) programming?

I read this term a lot in blogs about haskell and functional programming (specially in sigfpe's blog) but I don't have a clue about what it means. I get away with not knowing it most of the times, but ...
67
votes
11answers
19k views

Is Javascript a Functional Programming Language?

Just because functions are first class objects, there are closures, and higher order functions, does Javascript deserve to be called a Functional Programming language? The main thing I think it lacks ...
1
vote
2answers
96 views

What's the opposite of the term “closed over”?

Consider the following (C#) code. The lambda being passed to ConvolutedRand() is said to be "closed over" the variable named format. What term would you use to describe how the variable random is used ...
10
votes
2answers
680 views

What is the correct term for the following functional programming pattern?

I've heard it referred to as a stream, as an infinite list, and sometimes even as a lazy sequence. What is the correct term for the following pattern? (Clojure code shown) (def first$ first) (defn ...
4
votes
7answers
167 views

Which term to use when referring to functional data structures: persistent or immutable?

In the context of functional programming which is the correct term to use: persistent or immutable? When I Google "immutable data structures" I get a Wikipedia link to an article on "Persistent data ...
50
votes
8answers
6k views

What is 'Pattern Matching' in functional languages?

I'm reading about functional programming (in academic purpose) and I've noticed that Pattern Matching is mentioned in many articles as one of the core features of functional languages. Can someone ...
1
vote
3answers
131 views

Is there an existing pattern to generate a list of the applications of a function to every combination of the items in two lists?

I'm just getting into functional programming and i'm in the "try out some non-trivial examples and ask others if I'm doing it wrong" phase. I'm following Don Syme's F# Tutorial and have decided to ...
2
votes
5answers
297 views

Is there a standard name for this function?

What would you name a function that takes a list and a function, and returns True if applying the function to all elements gives the same result? def identical_results(l, func): if len(l) <= ...
521
votes
13answers
105k views

What is (functional) reactive programming?

I've read the Wikipedia article on reactive programming. I've also read the small article on functional reactive programming. The descriptions are quite abstract. What does functional reactive ...
2
votes
1answer
690 views

Dependency Injection and Inversion of Control - terminology

In functional programming, functions are regarded as entities, and can be passed around as objects are in an OO context. At some level, the function may be 'called' with some arguments. And I was ...
46
votes
4answers
3k views

What are “downward funargs”?

Jamie Zawinski uses that term in his (1997) article "java sucks" as if you should know what it means: I really hate the lack of downward-funargs; anonymous classes are a lame substitute. (I can ...
455
votes
37answers
58k views

What is a monad?

Having briefly looked at Haskell recently I wondered whether anybody could give a brief, succinct, practical explanation as to what a monad essentially is? I have found most explanations I've come ...
120
votes
9answers
25k views

What is a 'Closure'?

I asked a question about Currying and closures were mentioned. What is a closure? How does it relate to currying?
104
votes
3answers
14k views

What is 'Currying'?

I've seen references to curried functions in several articles and blogs but I can't find a good explanation (or at least one that makes sense!)