3
votes
2answers
136 views

Lambda's and proc's names

Is there reason why lambda is called lambda and proc is called proc? As fair I remember both are anonymous functions... and that's where similarities with Lambdas ends. They are not taking 1 argument ...
12
votes
9answers
4k views

What are REST resources?

What are REST resources and how do they relate to resource names and resource representations? I read a few articles on the subject, but they were too abstract and they left me more confused than I ...
2
votes
1answer
383 views

Referring to URLs in RESTful APIs

Here are a couple of standard URLs of a RESTful API. http://api.example.com/user/123 http://api.example.com/users The first retrieves a single user, the second - a collection of users (let's say ...
2
votes
2answers
127 views

I've seen formal arguments mentioned in ruby, is there anywhere explaining what they are exactly

Im looking for a good explanation of what this term means
2
votes
2answers
59 views

Are there more accurate terms for “class methods” in Ruby?

Is there really such a thing as a "class method" in Ruby (which is sometimes regarded as the equivalent of a static method in other languages), or is it merely something that just happens to be a ...
1
vote
1answer
901 views

Why is Method#arity called, well, arity?

In Ruby, I know that Method#arity will return a value representing the number of arguments accepted by a method, however I do not know why it is called arity. Can anyone provide some insight into why ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Is the “caller” in Java the same as the “receiver” in Ruby?

If I say x.hello() In Java, object x is "calling" the method it contains. In Ruby, object x is "receiving" the method it contains. Is this just different terminology for expressing the same idea ...
6
votes
3answers
878 views

“k.send :hello” - if k is the “receiver”, who is the sender?

In the example below, why do we say "k.send :hello" instead of "k.receive :hello" if, as stated elsewhere, k is actually the receiver? It sounds like k is the sender rather than the receiver. When ...
12
votes
3answers
1k views

In Ruby what does the “receiver” refer to?

I'm reading a document that talks about a method having a receiver. What's a receiver?
3
votes
4answers
803 views

Is 'c' said to be a character or a string in Ruby - or both?

char hello[] = "hello"; #C hello = ['h', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o'] #Ruby If I output the class of hello[0] in Ruby, it says "String". This is because single quoted Strings exist in Ruby and there does not ...
1
vote
2answers
926 views

Ruby Terminology Question: Is this a Ruby declaration, definition and assignment, all at the same time?

If I say: x = "abc" this seems like a declaration, definition and assignment, all at the same time, regardless of whether I have said anything about x in the program before. Is this correct? I'm ...
39
votes
7answers
18k views

What does 'Monkey Patching' exactly Mean in Ruby?

According to Wikipedia, a monkey patch is: a way to extend or modify the runtime code of dynamic languages [...] without altering the original source code. The following statement from the ...
25
votes
11answers
4k views

What does it mean for a programming language to be “on rails”?

I'm currently working with Groovy and Grails. While Groovy is pretty straight-forward since it's basically Java, I can't say I grok Grails. I read that Groovy is to Grails as Ruby is to Ruby on Rails, ...