The tag has no usage guidance.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

17
votes
3answers
2k views

Understanding Haskell Type Signatures

I am in the process of teaching myself Haskell and I was wondering about the following type signatures: Prelude> :t ($) ($) :: (a -> b) -> a -> b Prelude> How should I interpret (no ...
7
votes
1answer
163 views

What does # (pound sign) mean in type signatures?

What does # mean in type signatures like seq<#seq<'a>> compared to just seq<seq<'a>> ?
10
votes
4answers
9k views

Overloading function signatures haskell

I get the following error message when I compile: Duplicate type signature: weightedMedian.hs:71:0-39: findVal :: [ValPair] -> Double -> Double weightedMedian.hs:68:0-36: findVal :: [ValPair] -...
8
votes
1answer
523 views

What's going on in this type signature? (Vector.Mutable modifiers in Haskell)

Mutable vectors in Haskell have three element-level mutators: read :: PrimMonad m => MVector (PrimState m) a -> Int -> m a write :: PrimMonad m => MVector (PrimState m) a -> Int -> ...
4
votes
3answers
427 views

The type signature of a combinator does not match the type signature of its equivalent Lambda function

Consider this combinator: S (S K) Apply it to the arguments X Y: S (S K) X Y It contracts to: X Y I converted S (S K) to the corresponding Lambda terms and got this result: (\x y -> x y) ...
13
votes
1answer
4k views

Haskell type signature with multiple class constraints

How can I have multiple class constraints, so if A is an Eq and B is a Num, I could say either f :: Eq a => a -> b or f :: Num b => a -> b. So, how can I have Eq a => and Num b => ...
11
votes
1answer
156 views

Haskell `forever` type signature

In Haskell why is type-signature of forever forever :: Monad m => m a -> m b Specifically why isn't it just :: Monad m => m a -> m a? Surely the type of monad we are acting upon doesn't ...