"You Aren't Gonna Need It": An [tag:extreme-programming] principal, which advocates only introducing new features to an application when they are actually needed (as opposed to a need being foreseen).

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Is setting up the infrastructure project in advance a YAGNI?

Before we started solving business problems on our project, we have defined a set of re-usable components and implemented them in the Infrastructure Project. It included things like the entity base ...
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139 views

KISS & design patterns [closed]

I'm presented with a need to rewrite an old legacy desktop application. It is a smallish non-Java desktop program that still supports the daily tasks of several internal user communities. The ...
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139 views

Premature abstraction versus YAGNI across multiple similar projects

I've recently started doing some hobby game programming. When I first started, I tended towards trying to design abstractions. Even though I had a certain game in mind, I would ask myself how each ...
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Is YAGNI always valid? [closed]

I recently read about the You Ain't Gonna Need It principle, and it seems pretty logical to me. Now that I think about it, I remember lots of occasions where applying it could have saved me some ...
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Zend_Validate good strategy to avoid repetition of code

I'm am currently building two custom validators that extends Zend_Validate_Abstract which are named respectively Lib_Validate_TimeAfter and Lib_Validate_TimeBetween. The names a pretty straight ...
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3answers
989 views

Substitute Enum switch with design pattern (IOC)

I've got an event handler which receives an eventargs object inside which is an enumerated value that further refines the information inside. It looks something like public enum StatusCallbackType { ...
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SOLID vs. YAGNI

One of the most frequent agruments I hear for not adhering to the SOLID principles in the class design is YAGNI (allthough the arguer often doesn't call it that): "It is OK that I put both feature X ...
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Did the authors of The Pragmatic Programmer forget about YAGNI?

The Pragmatic Programmer is highly recommended by many people. I've just finished reading it, and I can see why people recommend it, although I would point out that Code Complete covers almost all of ...
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YAGNI and database creation scripts

Right now, I have code which creates the database (just a few CREATE queries on a SQLite database) in my main database access class. This seems unnecessary as I have no intention of ever using the ...
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5answers
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Is removing unused functionality a bad thing?

Is it possible for YAGNI to apply in the past tense? You created some functionality, it was used a little bit a while ago, but you aren't using it any more, and you don't want to maintain it, so you'd ...
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10answers
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Is internationalizing later really more expensive?

Most people would agree that internationalizing an existing app is more expensive than developing an internationalized app from scratch. Is that really true? Or when you write an internationalized ...
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12answers
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How far do you go with YAGNI?

I am developing a new revolutionary web application for the enterprise market. Sure, many before me thought that their web app would be revolutionary only to find out it isn't. (Or it is, but the ...
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5answers
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How to avoid debugger-only variables?

I commonly place into variables values that are only used once after assignment. I do this to make debugging more convenient later, as I'm able to hover the value on the one line where it's later ...
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Isn't there a point where encapsulation gets ridiculous?

For my software development programming class we were supposed to make a "Feed Manager" type program for RSS feeds. Here is how I handled the implementation of FeedItems. Nice and simple: struct ...
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Why is it so hard to enforce YAGNI?

I find myself breaking this pattern all the time. YAGNI - You Ain't Gonna Need It I am only a Junior Developer, but I find even Senior level developers doing the same thing. "Well, this ...
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465 views

Are KISS and YAGNI at odds with the trends towards increasingly more sophisticated patterns and practices like SOA, DDD, IoC, MVC, POCO, MVVM? [closed]

It seems to me that Agile methodologies encourage us to keep things simple, and lean, and not add complexity and sophistication until its needed. But the pace and volume of technology change ...
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YAGNI and junior developers

When writing code for a new system I don't want to introduce unnecessary complexity in the design that I might never have any need for. So I'm following YAGNI here, and rather refactoring as I see the ...
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341 views

Reasons not to overdesign a solution to a current problem

G'day, While having a think about this question here about overdesigning for possible future changes it got me thinking. What reasons against can you provide to people who insist on blowing out ...
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Does YAGNI also apply when writing tests?

When I write code I only write the functions I need as I need them. Does this approach also apply to writing tests? Should I write a test in advance for every use-case I can think of just to play ...
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8answers
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Does YAGNI apply to database design?

In code, it's generally pretty easy to add new classes to provide additional functionality and such. I have a fairly good understanding of refactoring code and what's involved so YAGNI generally ...
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6answers
539 views

Should you create an interface when there (currently) is only going to be one class that implements it?

Should you always create an interface if there's a possibility that there might be something else that could use it, or wait until there's an actual need for it then refactor to use an interface? ...
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3answers
248 views

Is there any hard data on the value of Inversion of Control or dependency injection?

I've read a lot about IoC and DI, but I'm not really convinced that you gain a lot by using them in most situations. If you are writing code that needs pluggable components, then yes, I see the ...
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9answers
752 views

Decoupling vs YAGNI

Do they contradict? Decoupling is something great and quite hard to achieve. However in most of the applications we don't really need it, so I can design highly coupled applications and it almost ...
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638 views

When to violate YAGNI? [closed]

The YAGNI "principle" states that you shouldn't focus on providing functionality before you needed as "you ain't gonna need it" anyway. I usually tend to use common sense above any rule, no matter ...
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YAGNI - The Agile practice that must not be named?

As I've increasingly absorbed Agile thinking into the way I work, yagni ("you aren't going to need it") seems to become more and more important. It seems to me to be one of the most effective rules ...
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4answers
282 views

Language Wizards considered harmful?

Wizards can kick-start features. They can also obfuscate your code, and are anti-YAGNI. On balance, do you think Wizards are more useful or more harmful?