2015

Developer Survey

Overview

Every year we run a survey. This year, more developers answered more questions than ever before.

26,086 people from 157 countries participated in our 45-question survey. 6,800 identified as full-stack developers, 1,900 as mobile developers, 1,200 as front-end developers, 2 as farmers, and 12,000 as something else.

Code is everywhere, and just about every coder uses Stack Overflow. Every day more coders are finding great jobs on Stack Overflow Careers.

We conducted this survey to help us better understand our community and to help our community better understand itself. For 2 weeks in early February we ran ads for the survey on Stack Overflow, posted it on Meta Stack Overflow, and shared it across social media.

These results are not unbiased. Like the results of any survey, they are skewed by selection bias, language bias, and probably a few other biases. So take this for what it is: the most comprehensive developer survey ever conducted. Or at least the only one that asks devs about tabs vs. spaces.

See the link in the footer to download the full data set.

Developer Profile

Who codes? Where do developers live? Are developers programmers and are programmers developers? Let's talk demographics.

There are now more than 7.2 billion people on planet Earth. About 32 million of them visit Stack Overflow monthly, and more than 25 million are return visitors. Return visitors land on Stack Overflow an average of 6 times every month. These are our Active Users in the map above.

This survey under represents developers who don't like to take English surveys. It's biased against devs in countries like China, Brazil, and Japan, who participate on Stack Overflow less than devs in other non-English speaking countries. It's for these devs that we've started to launch localized versions of Stack Overflow. Wherever you live, whatever language you speak, we want to help you build as efficiently and collaboratively as humanly possible.

  Country Devs per 1,000 people
Luxembourg 39.8
Iceland 35.0
Sweden 35.0
Israel 33.4
Finland 33.0
Singapore 31.7
With devs defined as return users. Among countries with at least 10,000 monthly Stack Overflow sessions.
  Country Devs per 1,000 people
Somalia 0.000
Chad 0.000
North Korea 0.000
Congo 0.004
Mali 0.009
South Sudan 0.012
With devs defined as return users. Among countries with at least 10 mil population.

Accounting for 25% of all sessions, the United States is the top traffic source to Stack Overflow. India is second (12.5%), followed by the UK (5.5%), and Germany (4.2%). But Luxembourg delivers more uniques per capita than any other country.

60+
  • 0.5%
51-60
  • 1.9%
40-50
  • 7.6%
35-39
  • 9.1%
30-34
  • 17.8%
25-29
  • 28.5%
20-24
  • 24.5%
< 20
  • 8.8%
25,831 responses

At the time of this writing, the average developer is 28.9 years old. He or she was born in April 1986, just as IBM manufactured the first megabit chip.

  Country Developer Age (avg.)
United States 31.6
United Kingdom 30.3
Canada 30.3
France 28.6
Germany 29.0
Poland 26.7
Russia 26.6
India 25.0
Among countries with at least 10 mil population

Programmers are especially young in developing countries like India, where the average developer is just 25 years old.

Male
  • 92.1%
Female
  • 5.8%
Prefer not to disclose
  • 1.7%
Other
  • 0.5%
25,744 responses

Software development has a gender balance problem. Our internal stats suggest the imbalance isn't quite as severe as the survey results would make it seem, but there's no doubt everyone who codes needs to be more proactive welcoming women into the field.

11+ years
  • 24.2%
6-10 years
  • 23.2%
2-5 years
  • 32.4%
1-2 years
  • 13.6%
Less than 1 year
  • 6.6%
24,827 responses

The programming field is growing extremely rapidly. In the United States, nearly 40% of doctors have 10+ years of professional experience. By contrast, only about 25% of developers worldwide have more than 10 years coding experience. Most of those veteran developers have probably been coding professionally much shorter than that.

11+ years
  • 9.5%
6-10 years
  • 15.1%
2-5 years
  • 30.1%
Less than 2 years
  • 37.1%
Respondents: 24,744
11+ years
  • 23.8%
6-10 years
  • 23.0%
2-5 years
  • 31.2%
Less than 2 years
  • 18.2%
Respondents: 24,744

Compared with men, women who code are nearly twice as likely to have less than 2 years programming experience. We hope this means more women are joining the industry and closing the gender gap.

Female Respondents by Geography

India
  • 15.1%
US
  • 4.8%
Sweden
  • 2.3%
Developers in India are 3-times more likely to be female than developers in the United States.
I'm self-taught
  • 41.8%
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (or related field)
  • 37.7%
On-the-job training
  • 36.7%
Masters degree in Computer Science (or related field)
  • 18.4%
Online class
  • 17.8%
Some university coursework in computer science (or related field) but no degree
  • 16.7%
Industry certification program
  • 6.1%
Other
  • 4.3%
Intensive code "boot-camp" or night school
  • 3.5%
PhD in Computer Science (or related field)
  • 2.2%
Mentorship program
  • 1.0%
21,314 responses

There are many ways to learn how to code. 48% of respondents never received a degree in computer science. 33% of respondents never took a computer science university course. System administrators are most likely to be self-taught (52%). Enterprise level services developers are most likely to have an industry certification (13%). Machine learning developers and data scientists are 10 times more likely than any other developer type to have a PhD (15%).

20+ hours per week
  • 9.5%
10-20 hours per week
  • 12.4%
5-10 hours per week
  • 23.2%
2-5 hours per week
  • 27.3%
1-2 hours per week
  • 19.2%
None
  • 8.3%
16,522 responses

For many developers, programming is a labor of love. 70% of respondents reported that they spend 2 or more hours per week programming either as a hobby or working on open source software. 20% of respondents spend more than 10 hours programming away from work. The average developer spends more than 7 hours per week coding on the side.

Technology

The more things change, the more likely it is those things are written in JavaScript with NotePad++ on a Windows machine (theme: dark) using Git, and tabs instead of spaces.

Javascript
  • 54.4%
SQL
  • 48.0%
Java
  • 37.4%
C#
  • 31.6%
PHP
  • 29.7%
Python
  • 23.8%
C++
  • 20.6%
C
  • 16.4%
Node.js
  • 13.3%
AngularJS
  • 13.3%
Ruby
  • 8.0%
Objective-C
  • 7.8%
21,982 responses
Javascript
  • 58.9%
SQL
  • 57.1%
Java
  • 37.6%
C#
  • 37.6%
PHP
  • 28.9%
Python
  • 23.4%
C++
  • 21.1%
C
  • 17.9%
Node.js
  • 9.8%
AngularJS
  • N/A
Ruby
  • 9.9%
Objective-C
  • 11.9%
6,537 responses
Javascript
  • 56.6%
SQL
  • 59.6%
Java
  • 42.5%
C#
  • 44.7%
PHP
  • 34.8%
Python
  • 21.9%
C++
  • 27.6%
C
  • 26.9%
Node.js
  • 7.5%
AngularJS
  • N/A
Ruby
  • 10.4%
Objective-C
  • 11.0%
8,042 responses

JavaScript remains the most-used programming language. Node.js and AngularJS are busting out. Java is still the #1 server side language (and the most frequently used tag on Stack Overflow). The C's continue to hold on strong.

Swift
  • 77.6%
C++11
  • 75.6%
Rust
  • 73.8%
Go
  • 72.5%
Clojure
  • 71.0%
Scala
  • 70.6%
F#
  • 70.1%
Haskell
  • 69.5%
C#
  • 67.2%
Python
  • 66.6%
% of devs who are developing with the language or tech that have expressed interest in continuing to develop with it.
Salesforce
  • 73.2%
Visual Basic
  • 72.0%
Wordpress
  • 68.2%
Matlab
  • 65.6%
Sharepoint
  • 62.8%
LAMP
  • 62.2%
Perl
  • 59.2%
Cordova
  • 58.8%
Coffeescript
  • 54.7%
Other
  • 57.3%
% of devs who are developing with the language or tech but have not expressed interest in continuing to do so.
Android
  • 17.7%
Javascript
  • 15.4%
Python
  • 14.8%
Node.js
  • 14.6%
AngularJS
  • 13.2%
Java
  • 10.5%
iOS
  • 9.4%
Arduino / Raspberry Pi
  • 8.5%
Swift
  • 8.5%
C#
  • 8.0%
% of devs who are not developing with the language or tech but have expressed interest in developing with it.

We asked respondents what programming languages and technologies they've developed with over the past year and what languages and technologies they want to develop with. By comparing status quo vs. aspiration we can see how developers perceive available programming tools.

Windows 7
  • 33.8%
Mac OS X
  • 21.5%
Linux
  • 20.5%
Windows 8
  • 19.5%
Windows XP
  • 1.0%
Windows Vista
  • 0.2%
Other
  • 3.5%
22,771 responses
Windows 7
  • 45.6%
Mac OS X
  • 20.3%
Linux
  • 20.9%
Windows 8
  • 6.4%
Windows XP
  • 5.9%
Windows Vista
  • N/A
Other
  • 0.5%
6,565 responses
Windows 7
  • 48.0%
Mac OS X
  • 18.7%
Linux
  • 19.9%
Windows 8
  • N/A
Windows XP
  • 10.8%
Windows Vista
  • 1.6
Other
  • 1.0%
8,074 responses

For the third year in a row, we asked respondents which operating system they use the most. Windows maintains the lion's share of the developer operating system market, while Mac appears to have overtaken the Linuxes among active Stack Overflow devs.

Linux may be a small player on the consumer market, with just 1.5% of global desktop operating system share, but it's a go-to OS for developers.

The Linuxes - Dev Share 2015

Ubuntu
  • 12.0%
Debian
  • 2.2%
Mint
  • 1.6%
Fedora
  • 1.3%
Other
  • 4.0%
4,667 responses
NotePad++
  • 34.7%
Sublime Text
  • 25.2%
Vim
  • 15.2%
Emacs
  • 3.8%
Atom.io
  • 2.8%
TextMate
  • 1.4%
Coda
  • 0.7%
XEmacs
  • 0.3%
Other
  • 16.2%
16,778 responses

Developer type influences choice of text editor. Either that or Emacs turns people into mathematics-focused developers. Data scientists and machine learning developers are about 3 times more likely to use Emacs than any other type of developer.

Preferred Text Editor by Occupation

Occupation Preferred text editor
Desktop Developers NotePad++
Front-end web developers Sublime Text
DevOps & Sys admins Vim
Full-stack developers Notepad++ and Sublime Text
Dark
  • 52.5%
Light
  • 39.9%
I don't use an IDE
  • 7.7%

Developers prefer working with a dark IDE theme. We did a little further mining and discovered desktop developers prefer a light theme, front-end developers prefer dark, and mobile developers are split down the middle.

Git
  • 69.3%
SVN
  • 36.9%
TFS
  • 12.2%
Mercurial
  • 7.9%
CVS
  • 4.2%
Perforce
  • 3.3%
Other
  • 5.8%
I don't use source control
  • 9.3%
16,694 responses

Source control is an industry standard tool. However, fun fact: about 10% of developers still don't use it.

Tabs
  • 45.0%
Spaces
  • 33.6%
It depends
  • 17.0%
Huh?
  • 4.5%
25,807 responses

After millennia of heated debate, mercifully, at long last, we have an answer. Most developers prefer tabs to spaces.

Upon closer examination of the data, a trend emerges: Developers increasingly prefer spaces as they gain experience. Stack Overflow reputation correlates with a preference for spaces, too: users who have 10,000 rep or more prefer spaces to tabs at a ratio of 3 to 1.

  Country Caffeinated beverages per day (avg.)
Norway 3.09
Netherlands 3.04
Sweden 2.94
Finland 2.76
Iran 2.74
Denmark 2.70
South Africa 2.59
United Kingdom 2.54
Turkey 2.50
Germany 2.44
16,516 responses

Like most working humans, developers demand caffeine. The average developer drinks 2.2 servings of coffee, tea, Surge, or other caffeinated beverage every day. Nordic devs drink much more coffee than most.

Which developer types drink the most coffee?

Occupation Caffeinated beverages per day (avg.)
Product manager 2.92
Executive (VP of Eng., CTO, CIO, etc.) 2.74
Business intelligence or data warehousing expert 2.67
System administrator 2.58
Growth hacker 2.49

Work

The labor landscape is constantly evolving for those who know how to code. New developer types are emerging. More developers are going remote (and getting better, higher-paying jobs because of it). More than most professions, developers enjoy what they do, and it shows: nearly every developer spends time coding on the side.

Full-stack web developer
  • 32.4%
Student
  • 13.6%
Back-end web developer
  • 10.1%
Mobile developer (all)
  • 9.1%
Desktop developer
  • 8.3%
Front-end web developer
  • 6.0%
Enterprise level services developer
  • 2.9%
Embedded application developer
  • 2.9%
Executive (VP of Eng., CTO, CIO, etc.)
  • 1.8%
System administrator
  • 1.6%
Database administrator
  • 0.6%
22,148 responses
Full-stack web developer
  • 26.8%
Student
  • 13.9%
Back-end web developer
  • 9.7%
Mobile developer (all)
  • 7.9%
Desktop developer
  • 9.8%
Front-end web developer
  • 5.2%
Enterprise level services developer
  • 3.6%
Embedded application developer
  • 2.5%
Executive (VP of Eng., CTO, CIO, etc.)
  • 1.4%
System administrator
  • 2.1%
Database administrator
  • 0.8%
7,346 responses
Full-stack web developer
  • 29.0%
Student
  • 8.6%
Back-end web developer
  • 9.3%
Mobile developer (all)
  • 7.7%
Desktop developer
  • 11.3%
Front-end web developer
  • 5.1%
Enterprise level services developer
  • 5.3%
Embedded application developer
  • 2.6%
Executive (VP of Eng., CTO, CIO, etc.)
  • 2.4%
System administrator
  • 2.7%
Database administrator
  • 0.8%
8,218 responses

We provided respondents with a list of 24 common developer types and asked them to choose the occupation that best describes what they do. For the third year in a row, "full-stack developer" was the most common response.

Mobile Developer - Android
  • 44.6%
Mobile Developer - iOS
  • 33.4%
Mobile developer
  • 19.8%
Mobile developer - Windows Phone
  • 2.3%
1,900 responses

Of more than 22,000 respondents, 1,900 said they are primarily a mobile developer. Android developers outnumber iOS developers 4 to 3. Just over 2% of mobile developers identify as Windows Phone developers. 20% of mobile developers don't identify with a particular mobile platform.

Developer with a statistics or mathematics background
  • 45.6%
Data scientist
  • 40.2%
Machine learning developer
  • 14.2%
1,018 responses

We've been able to identify a number of emerging developer types by observing patterns in Stack Overflow users' browsing behavior. Developers with a stats and math background and machine learning developers are a couple of these new dev types. Data scientist is a related developer type that is slightly more established.

DevOps
  • 1.5%
Business intelligence or data warehousing expert
  • 0.8%
Graphics programmer
  • 0.7%
Quality Assurance
  • 0.7%
Product Manager
  • 0.7%
Designer
  • 0.7%
Database administrator
  • 0.5%
Growth hacker
  • 0.3%
Game developer or designer
  • 0.3%
"Full-stack developer and..."
  • 0.2%
Scientist
  • 0.1%
Professor or teacher
  • 0.1%
Analyst
  • 0.1%
Astrophysicist
  • 0.01%
Farmer
  • 0.01%
I shoot lasers at stuffz
  • 0.005%

The spectrum of developer types is vast, and it's often unclear where one type ends and another begins. More than 300 respondents identified as DevOps, nearly 200 identified as business intelligence or data warehousing experts, and 59 identified as "growth hacker" – the smallest segment of developers among the multiple choice options.

"Other" developer types make the field even more interesting: nearly 1,600 respondents submitted a write-in response for occupation. Game developers and designers made up the largest segment among write-in dev types. More than 100 write-in respondents included multiple dev types in their occupation choice. Only one respondent wrote in that he/she works with lasers.

Software Products
  • 25%
Web Services / Internet
  • 17%
Finance / Banking
  • 8%
Consulting
  • 7%
Media / Advertising / Entertainment and Gaming
  • 7%
Health / Biotech / Science
  • 5%
Education / Academia / Research
  • 5%
Telecommunications
  • 4%
Government
  • 3%
Other
  • 20%
16,160 responses
Software Products
  • 45%
Web Services / Internet
  • 19%
Finance / Banking
  • 6%
Consulting
  • 4%
Media / Advertising / Entertainment and Gaming
  • 4%
Health / Biotech / Science
  • 3%
Education / Academia / Research
  • 3%
Telecommunications
  • 3%
Government
  • 1%
Other
  • 13%
16,160 responses
Software Products
  • 29%
Web Services / Internet
  • 21%
Finance / Banking
  • 9%
Consulting
  • 3%
Media / Advertising / Entertainment and Gaming
  • 9%
Health / Biotech / Science
  • 3%
Education / Academia / Research
  • 2%
Telecommunications
  • 5%
Government
  • 2%
Other
  • 16%
16,160 responses
Software Products
  • 18%
Web Services / Internet
  • 14%
Finance / Banking
  • 8%
Consulting
  • 7%
Media / Advertising / Entertainment and Gaming
  • 7%
Health / Biotech / Science
  • 7%
Education / Academia / Research
  • 5%
Telecommunications
  • 2%
Government
  • 4%
Other
  • 27%
16,160 responses

Respondents from developed countries are more likely than others to say they work in an industry outside the traditional software powerhouses.

Objective-C
  • $98,828
Node.js
  • $96,539
C#
  • $94,280
C++
  • $91,739
SQL
  • $91,431
C
  • $91,264
Ruby
  • $90,536
JavaScript
  • $90,259
Java
  • $89,054
Python
  • $88,966
PHP
  • $77,322
Objective-C
  • $58,688
Node.js
  • $59,227
C#
  • $59,978
C++
  • $56,680
SQL
  • $55,740
C
  • $55,259
Ruby
  • $60,000
JavaScript
  • $55,425
Java
  • $53,404
Python
  • $56,192
PHP
  • $46,060
Objective-C
  • $24,844
Node.js
  • $28,543
C#
  • $26,025
C++
  • $22,905
SQL
  • $24,940
C
  • $24,423
Ruby
  • $24,714
JavaScript
  • $24,968
Java
  • $25,559
Python
  • $25,640
PHP
  • $22,563
19,483 responses

We asked respondents how much they earn in US dollars, including bonus. We cross tabulated compensation with competency in specific technologies to see which tech pays best.

Niche or emerging technologies pay big bucks. So does big data and cloud computing. This may reflect a shortage of certain skills in the workforce – companies are willing to pay more when hiring for cutting edge skillsets. It's also likely that developers with niche competencies are just better developers all around.

Top Paying Technologies

Cassandra
  • 152%
Spark
  • 148%
F#
  • 144%
Scala
  • 132%
Rust
  • 131%
Hadoop
  • 131%
Cloud (AWS, GAE, Azure, etc.)
  • 126%
Redis
  • 125%
Go
  • 121%
Clojure
  • 114%
13,110 responses from top 35 responding countries. Average salary calculated per country.
  Country How many Big Macs can you buy? Average Salary
Ukraine 21,825 $26,190.48
South Africa 19,215 $42,658.23
United States 18,712 $89,631.68
Australia 17,802 $76,904.76
Russia 17,571 $23,897.28
United Kingdom 15,757 $68,860.59
Israel 15,280 $68,000
Canada 14,711 $68,262.48
Ireland 14,661 $62,456.14
New Zealand 14,042 $63,052.63
China 13,803 $38,235.29
Among countries with at least 100 survey respondents. Based on The Economist's Jan 2015 Big Mac Index.

When it comes to quality of life, dollars, Euros and Yen don't matter. Big Macs matter. The Economist's Big Mac Index is a measure of purchasing power parity that can be used to compare the true value of compensation between workers in different economies.

Where can an average developer eat the most (and live the best)? The survey says: Ukraine, where Big Macs cost only about $1.20.

Full-time remote
  • 114.1%
Part-time remote
  • 108.0%
Rarely remote
  • 97.4%
Never remote
  • 79.7%
Average salaries calculated per country among respondents from top 35 responding countries.
Full-time remote
  • 113.0%
Part-time remote
  • 110.4%
Rarely remote
  • 105.8%
Never remote
  • 90.5%
Average salaries calculated per country among respondents from top 35 responding countries.
Full-time remote
  • 140.8%
Part-time remote
  • 112.2%
Rarely remote
  • 94.9%
Never remote
  • 72.5%
Average salaries calculated per country among respondents from top 35 responding countries.
Full-time remote
  • 150.0%
Part-time remote
  • 100.1%
Rarely remote
  • 96.4%
Never remote
  • 76.3%
Average salaries calculated per country among respondents from top 35 responding countries.
Full-time remote
  • 123.4%
Part-time remote
  • 102.2%
Rarely remote
  • 99.9%
Never remote
  • 76.3%
Average salaries calculated per country among respondents from top 35 responding countries.

Remote work pays. Developers who work remotely full-time earn about 40% more than those who never work remote. The disparity is more pronounced in developing countries.

10,000+
  • 135%
5,000 to 9,999
  • 121%
500 to 4,999
  • 108%
2 to 499
  • 91%
1
  • 83%
% average salary by country. 13,224 respondents from top 35 responding countries.

We always said participating on Stack Overflow is good for your career. Now we have proof.

In truth, we don't know that there's any causal link between reputation and compensation, but indulge us for a moment. If rep equals money, you could get a 10% raise just by going from 1 to 100 rep on Stack Overflow. If rep equals money, you would only reach average developer status once you earned between 200-499 rep. And you'd earn 135% average salary once you hit 10,000 rep. It may be a good time to hunt a bounty...

Employed full-time
  • 66.3%
I'm a student
  • 15.9%
Freelance / Contractor
  • 9.0%
Employed part-time
  • 4.2%
Unemployed
  • 2.0%
Retired
  • 0.3%
Prefer not to disclose
  • 1.2%
Other
  • 1.1%
21,306 responses

If you're a software developer, you probably have a job. 97.5% of workforce respondents are employed in at least a part-time capacity.

And even if you work full-time, you probably code on the side. The average fully employed developer spends more than 6 hours every week working on open source, side- or hobby projects. Retired developers spend nearly 3 times as many hours on hobby projects. Code is life for most devs, and for many coding is a lifetime pursuit.

Time Spent Coding on the Side

Employed full-time
  • 6 hours 13 min
I'm a student
  • 9 hours 11 min
Freelance / Contractor
  • 8 hours 59 min
Employed part-time
  • 7 hours 41 min
Unemployed
  • 13 hours 28 min
Retired
  • 16 hours 22 min
16,483 respondents
I love my job
  • 36.0%
I'm somewhat satisfied with my job
  • 40.4%
I'm neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with my job
  • 11.0%
I'm somewhat dissatisfied with my job
  • 9.7%
I hate my job
  • 1.9%
16,174 responses

We asked respondents how satisfied they are with their current job or jobs. 76% of developers report being at least satisfied with their job, and 36% love their job. Developers are generally more fulfilled by work than most employees.

And developers in Iran are more satisfied with their jobs than developers anywhere else. Stack Overflow Careers may not have any jobs available in Iran, but you can still move there and apply for one of our many available remote jobs.

Job satisfaction by Geography

  Country Average Satisfaction Score
Iran 3.78
Netherlands 3.69
Norway 3.68
Israel 3.63
Denmark 3.61
Switzerland 3.58
Highest satisfaction scores among countries with 100 or more respondents. Satisfactions scores calculated as average of responses, with extra weight given to "I love my job."
Executive (VP of Eng., CTO, CIO, etc.)
  • 3.90
Machine learning developer
  • 3.63
Mobile developer - iOS
  • 3.58
Mobile developer
  • 3.57
Developer with a statistics or mathematics background
  • 3.43
16,288 responses
Product manager
  • 2.97
Business intelligence or data warehousing expert
  • 3.05
Graphics programmer
  • 3.15
Back-end web developer
  • 3.21
Quality Assurance
  • 3.21
16,288 responses

It feels good to be the boss. Executives are 16% more satisfied (on an arbitrary 5-point scale) than average (3.36). Product managers are generally the least satisfied with their jobs.

Full-time Remote
  • 10.4%
Part-time Remote
  • 18.6%
I rarely work remote
  • 48.1%
Never
  • 22.8%
16,154 responses

29% of developers work at least part-time remote. This is up from 21% last year. More developers are choosing to work from home and more companies are embracing the remote workplace. (We're one of those companies.)

It's non-negotiable
  • 4.1%
Very important
  • 16.7%
Somewhat important
  • 29.1%
Neutral - I don't mind working in the office or remotely
  • 39.3%
Not important
  • 10.8%
18,890 responses

Code is breaking down cubicle walls. 50% of developers say working remote is at least somewhat important. Note to companies trying to hire: if your job listing doesn't include remote, you could be cutting your possible applicant pool in half. And you may be eliminating the most qualified developers from consideration. Stack Overflow users with 5,000+ rep are twice more likely than other developers to say "remote optional" is non-negotiable.

Community

Without people, Stack Overflow is just a pile of pixels. It's thanks to the devs who answer, upvote, edit, and ask that everyone benefits from the library of Q&A we've amassed since the first question was asked in 2008. Reputation and gamification is just a tiny part of what makes Stack Overflow work. Community is everything.

Always
  • 10.2%
Usually
  • 76%
Sometimes
  • 13.1%
Rarely
  • 0.6%
Never
  • 0.2%
16,399 responses

Stack Overflow users have saved their fellow developers millions of hours of work. We asked respondents how often the answers they find are are helpful. 86% of respondents say answers are usually or always helpful.

Multiple times a day
  • 65.4%
Once a day
  • 20.4%
Once a week
  • 9.9%
Once a month
  • 1.9%
Very rarely
  • 1.9%
I have never been on Stack Overflow. I just love taking surveys.
  • 0.5%
16,519 responses

Two-thirds of respondents say they visit multiple times per day.

10,000+
  • 5.1%
5,000 to 9,999
  • 3.4%
3,000 to 4,999
  • 3.6%
2,000 to 2,999
  • 3.3%
1,000 to 1,999
  • 6.3%
500 to 999
  • 7.1%
200 to 499
  • 6.9%
100 to 199
  • 7.2%
50 to 99
  • 5.7%
2 to 49
  • 13.8%
1
  • 8.9%
I don't have an account
  • 21.2%
Not sure
  • 7.5%
24,764 responses
10,000+
  • 0.6%
5,000 to 9,999
  • 0.7%
3,000 to 4,999
  • 0.9%
2,000 to 2,999
  • 1.1%
1,000 to 1,999
  • 2.7%
500 to 999
  • 4.0%
200 to 499
  • 5.5%
100 to 199
  • 6.7%
50 to 99
  • 6.8%
2 to 49
  • 27.0%
1
  • 44.0%
I don't have an account
  • N/A
Not sure
  • N/A
Signed-in users who visited Stack Overflow Feb 9 to March 9.

We asked respondents how much Stack Overflow rep they have. (We double-checked responses vs. actual rep for users who provided account info – our users are remarkably honest people.) Whereas respondent rep distribution includes 100% of respondents, active user distribution includes only the ~5% of Stack Overflow visitors who are ever signed-in.

To get help for my job
  • 72.1%
Because I love to learn
  • 65.6%
To give help to others
  • 55.5%
To receive help on my personal projects
  • 40.5%
Because I can't do my job without it
  • 20.5%
To communicate with others like me
  • 17.1%
To demonstrate that I'm good at what I do
  • 16.4%
To maintain an online presence
  • 14.3%
I don't really use Stack Overflow. I just take surveys.
  • 1.3%
16,397 responses

We asked respondents why they use Stack Overflow, allowing for multiple answer selections. More than half of respondents use Stack Overflow to help other developers. Nearly 3 out of 4 developers are here to get help for their job. 2 out of 3 developers say they are motivated by a passion for learning new things.

It feels good to help a programmer in need
  • 64.0%
My answer will help lots of people who have the same problem in the future
  • 54.2%
I don't answer much (or at all), but I want to answer more
  • 35.7%
I feel a sense of responsibility to the developer community
  • 32.4%
It feels good to demonstrate my expertise
  • 30.2%
Demonstrating my expertise will benefit me
  • 20.8%
I have no idea why I answer but I do it anyway
  • 6.4%
I don't answer much (or at all), and I don't want to
  • 4.4%
15,980 responses

60% of survey respondents have provided an answer on Stack Overflow. What motivates answerers? More than any other motivation, developers answer because it feels good to help a fellow developer. More than half of respondents answer to leave artifacts that will help many developers in the future. And 6% of Stack Overflow answerers don't know why they answer – they just do.

Keep Stack Overflow flowing

Help fellow developers build by answering one of our unanswered questions. One answer helps one developer now, and many more developers in the future.

Share
We included only limited results above. See all the data and do your own analysis with the full (sanitized to remove personally-identifying information) results.

Built with ♥ using  c# jQuery font-awesome bootstrap unicorn tears