5 of 6 Added reminder that people here are not God.

Perl - Overloading package/class properties?

I am attempting to port some code from PHP that basically boils down to property overloading. That is, if you try to get or set a class property that is not actually defined as a part of the class, it will send that information to a function that will pretty much do anything I want with it. (In this case, I want to search an associative array within the class before giving up.)

However, Perl is... quite a bit different from PHP, given that classes are already hashes. Is there any way that I can apply some equivalent of __get() and __set() to a Perl "class" that will remain completely encapsulated in that package, transparent to anything trying to actually get or set properties?

EDIT: The best way to explain this may be to show you code, show the output, and then show what I want it to output.

package AccessTest;

my $test = new Sammich;   #"improper" style, don't care, not part of the question.

say 'bacon is: ' . $test->{'bacon'};
say 'cheese is: ' . $test->{'cheese'};

for (keys $test->{'moreProperties'}) {
 say "$_ => " . $test->{'moreProperties'}{$_};
}

say 'invalid is: ' . $test->{'invalid'};

say 'Setting invalid.';
$test->{'invalid'} = 'true';
say 'invalid is now: ' . $test->{'invalid'};

for (keys $test->{'moreProperties'}) {
 say "$_ => " . $test->{'moreProperties'}{$_};
}


package Sammich;

sub new
{
 my $className = shift;
 my $this = {
  'bacon' => 'yes',
  'moreProperties' => {
  'cheese' => 'maybe',
  'ham' => 'no'
  }
};

return bless($this, $className);
}

This currently outputs:

bacon is: yes
Use of uninitialized value in concatenation (.) or string at ./AccessTest.pl line 11.
cheese is: 
cheese => maybe
ham => no
Use of uninitialized value in concatenation (.) or string at ./AccessTest.pl line 17.
invalid is: 
Setting invalid.
invalid is now: true
cheese => maybe
ham => no

Now, I need to make modifications to Sammich only, without making any changes at all to the initial AccessTest package, that will result in this:

bacon is: yes
cheese is: maybe
cheese => maybe
ham => no
invalid is: 0
Setting invalid.
invalid is now: true
cheese => maybe
ham => no
invalid => true

As you can see, the desired effect is that the 'cheese' property, since it's not a part of the test object directly, would instead be grabbed from the 'moreProperties' hash. 'invalid' would attempt the same thing, but since it is neither a direct property nor in 'moreProperties', it would act in whatever way programmed - in this case, I would want it to simply return the value 0, without any errors or warnings. Upon attempting to set the 'invalid' property, it would not be added to the object directly, because it's not already there, but would instead be added to the 'moreProperties' hash.

I'm expecting this to take more than the six or so lines it would require in PHP, but as it is a very important concept of OOP, I fully expect Perl to handle it somehow.

EDIT Again: I shouldn't have to explain why I need to do this to get a simple answer, but I am essentially trying to port a modified framework from PHP to Perl, and this is involved specifically in the Model aspect. As is typical in that area, properties (representing database fields) are accessed and altered directly, despite not actually being properties of the object its self, but rather residing in an underlying structure. It would be unfeasible to apply a getter-setter to such properties that are entirely different depending on the table accessed, not to mention violating the modularity of MVC architecture. Unless you actually spend your time developing frameworks, I don't think you're qualified to criticize the decisions of, say, the developers of Yii. Please put your arrogance aside.