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This tag should be used only on questions that are about Objective-C features or depend on code in the language. The tags "cocoa" and "cocoa-touch" should be used to ask about Apple's frameworks or classes. Use the related tags [ios] and [osx] for issues specific to those platforms.

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I had a question about naming conventions. I noticed that in many community Objective-C classes and in Apple's frameworks they name some of the variables using a convention _name is there a reason … for having the _ (underscore). Should I be doing this in my own classes? If so where and when should I use it? …
asked Oct 3 '10 by Justin Meiners
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Possible Duplicate: How does an underscore in front of a variable in a cocoa objective-c class work? In objective C I am seeing lots of code with a underscore before variable names e.g _someVariable why is that? also how to you write accessors i.e get and set method for such a variable. …
asked Aug 24 '11 by Java Ka Baby
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to the variable names. While i realize that this is due to an established convention, I wonder: Is there any significance whether underscore precedes or completes variable name? For example take _name, name and name_ As Objective-C programmer, what if anything, does underscore signify to you? … Possible Duplicate: Prefixing property names with an underscore in Objective C In Objective-C book i am reading and in some of the code i saw, sometimes, people add underscores …
asked Jul 30 '11 by Jam
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Possible Duplicate: Prefixing property names with an underscore in Objective C I am a C/C++ developer and am learning Objective-C. Recently I started on a tutorial that I found on net … = coordinate; } return self; } @end Can anyone please explain me the meaning of the statement @synthesize coordinate=_coordinate; I know the meaning of @synthesize. But could not understand the complete statement. _coordinate is a member variable. But what is coordinate? Where is it declared? …
asked Apr 14 '11 by user654034
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Possible Duplicate: How does an underscore in front of a variable in a cocoa objective-c class work? I found that in Apple's frameworks' header files , Apple name instance variable … convention when defining our own instance variable? I've been searching the answer for this question for quite a long time. In apple's Code Guideline, apple just said they reserve the methods name begin …
asked Apr 11 '11 by Jimmy
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name as the property, but with an underscore prefix. For a property called firstName, for example, the synthesized instance variable will be called _firstName. However, later, it says: Important … : If you use @synthesize without specifying an instance variable name, like this: @synthesize firstName; the instance variable will bear the same name as the property. In this example, the instance …
asked Jul 17 '14 by Cupidvogel
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I've seen in a few iPhone examples that attributes have used an underscore _ in front of the variable. Does anyone know what this means? or how it works? an interface file I'm using looks like … the above does but when I try to set the mission name like: aMission.missionName = missionName; I get the error: request for member 'missionName' in something not a structure or union …
asked May 4 '09 by Atma
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I used to use prefix underscore for instance variable naming, to distinguish from local variables. I happend to see the "Google Objective-C Style Guide", and found that it suggests to use trailing …
asked Jan 12 '12 by Kjuly
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) and public (like properties) with just the name. With this you just can call the same variable name in your functions. Example: ExampleClass.h @interface ExampleClass : NSObject { NSString … I see this is a fairly old question with a accepted answer but I have a better solution and its code convention. The convention states that you prefix private variables with a underscore (_varName …
answered Sep 23 '11 by Juzzz
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type the property and synthesize statement. In the most recent language version you don't even need the synthesize statement. Automatically an instance variable named _propertyName (underscore + name … : e.g. readonly will generate only a getter). But a property operates (and so it needs) an instance variable. Usually what you see in the implementation file is something like @implementation class1 …
answered Sep 13 '13 by Francesco
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Possible Duplicate: When do you make an underscore in front of an instance variable? As in Objective C, instance variable are protected by default, what are your preferred way to name it? Assume you have an variable name, the following 3 ways have their supporters. _foo foo_ foo …
asked Apr 15 '11 by Howard
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Change your declearation to.. @property (nonatomic) CGRect frame; Hope it will solve your issue. It happened because previous one created an instance variable named __frame which contains 2 underscore. …
answered Jun 30 '14 by DareDevil
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with the same name as an instance variable. The underscore prefix also makes clear that you are referring to an instance variable. By using the underscore prefix for instance variables, you're free to use … An Objective-C property usually has a backing instance variable (I guess you know the difference between a property and an instance variable). The property may have a different name than …
answered Nov 16 '11 by Macmade
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This question is about variable naming style in objective c and cocoa. I just want to stress that I'm not looking for a "right" answer, just good ideas. I've read through Apple and Google's … itself seems perfectly happy having function parameters of the exact same name as instance variables. That makes me cringe personally. Googles guide specifies that instance variables should …
asked Nov 7 '09 by DougW
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, to solve, I used the underscore in synthesize; @synthesize varX = _varX; and the method is: -(void)setVarX:(float)varX { _varX = varX; } is proper to use the underscore before variables in this way? otherwise how do I use the name of the method suggested by Xcode? thanks … This is a purely theoretical question: I have a class that has a variable: varX. I have a method that changes this variable. Xcode, with autocompletion suggest: -(void)setVarX:(float)varX …
asked Aug 6 '12 by Vins

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