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This tag should be used only on questions that are about Objective-C features or depend on code in the language. The tags "cocoa" and "cocoa-touch" should be used to ask about Apple's frameworks or classes. Use the related tags [ios] and [osx] for issues specific to those platforms.

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I had a question about naming conventions. I noticed that in many community Objective-C classes and in Apple's frameworks they name some of the variables using a convention is there a reason …
asked oct 3 '10 by Justin Meiners
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Possible Duplicate: How does an underscore in front of a variable in a cocoa objective-c class work? In objective C I am seeing lots of code with a underscore before variable names e.g _someVariable why is that? also how to you write accessors i.e get and set method for such a variable. …
asked aug 24 '11 by Java Ka Baby
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Possible Duplicate: Prefixing property names with an underscore in Objective C In Objective-C book i am reading and in some of the code i saw, sometimes, people add underscores … to the variable names. While i realize that this is due to an established convention, I wonder: Is there any significance whether underscore precedes or completes variable name? For example take As Objective-C programmer, what if anything, does underscore signify to you? …
asked jul 30 '11 by Jam
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language version you don't even need the synthesize statement. Automatically an instance variable named (underscore + name of the property) is created. BTW: sometimes you still need to make your own … getter and/or setter. Classic naming convention applies (e.g. for setter and for getter), but same rules as before for properties: if you support only the most recent OSes you can just write the statement and right your getter and setter by using the "underscored" variable... …
answered sep 13 '13 by Francesco
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) and public (like properties) with just the name. With this you just can call the same variable name in your functions. Example: ExampleClass.h ExampleClass.m …
answered sep 23 '11 by Juzzz
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Possible Duplicate: How does an underscore in front of a variable in a cocoa objective-c class work? I found that in Apple's frameworks' header files , Apple name instance variable … with prefix underscope inside a class interface. like the _delegate instance below: But is there any side effects if we follow this naming convention when defining our own instance variable? I've been …
asked apr 11 '11 by Jimmy
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Change your declearation to.. Hope it will solve your issue. It happened because previous one created an instance variable named which contains 2 underscore. …
answered jun 30 by DareDevil
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An Objective-C property usually has a backing instance variable (I guess you know the difference between a property and an instance variable). The property may have a different name than … the instance variable. For instance, you may have an instance variable named , with a property named . You can synthesize the property to the variable using: Now about the underscore. It's a common …
answered nov 16 '11 by Macmade
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Possible Duplicate: Prefixing property names with an underscore in Objective C I am a C/C++ developer and am learning Objective-C. Recently I started on a tutorial that I found on net …
asked apr 14 '11 by user654034
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I used to use prefix underscore for instance variable naming, to distinguish from local variables. I happend to see the "Google Objective-C Style Guide", and found that it suggests to use trailing …
asked jan 12 '12 by Kjuly
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) doesn't interfere with/override the name/scope of the backing ivar. Example: Furthermore, the underscore convention is widely know to specify internal-use-only for that variable. To quote apple … guidelines: Make sure the name of the instance variable concisely describes the attribute stored. Usually, you should not access instance variables directly, instead you should use accessor …
answered jun 14 '12 by CrimsonDiego
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to synthesizing getter and setter (if necessary) implementations, auto-synthesis will also synthesize an instance variable prefixed with an underscore. So given the following declaration... ...the compiler will synthesize an instance variable named as well as and method implementations that access . …
answered aug 26 '12 by jlehr
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You can declare instance variables and properties in the @interface. In the implementation, you can use When you do that, the compiler creates an instance variable named "instancevariable … " if it doesn't exist yet, and generates code for the setter and getter as needed. The variable name is anything that you want to use. on its own is the same as which means an instance variable …
answered jul 17 by gnasher729
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You can't declare a method without a parameter name because in this case there is no way for the compiler to tell if the next token after the type is a parameter name or it is a part of the method … name. Let me demonstrate it on this example: This is a correct method declaration. Now let's edit it as you propose: It's pretty obvious for us what we mean. We can tell, that is clearly a part …
answered apr 4 by FreeNickname
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the property through the setter, or to use to access the variable directly: Even better, rename the property to something with no underscores, to be consistent with how Apple recommends to name properties. …
answered jun 30 by dasblinkenlight

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