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This tag should be used only on questions that are about Objective-C features or depend on code in the language. The tags "cocoa" and "cocoa-touch" should be used to ask about Apple's frameworks or classes. Use the related tags [ios] and [osx] for issues specific to those platforms.

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Possible Duplicate: How does an underscore in front of a variable in a cocoa objective-c class work? In objective C I am seeing lots of code with a underscore before variable names e.g _someVariable why is that? also how to you write accessors i.e get and set method for such a variable. …
asked aug 24 '11 by Java Ka Baby
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I had a question about naming conventions. I noticed that in many community Objective-C classes and in Apple's frameworks they name some of the variables using a convention _name is there a reason … for having the _ (underscore). Should I be doing this in my own classes? If so where and when should I use it? …
asked oct 3 '10 by Justin Meiners
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Possible Duplicate: How does an underscore in front of a variable in a cocoa objective-c class work? Can anyone point me to an explanation of the use of underscores, I have always assumed …
asked apr 7 '11 by fuzzygoat
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I've seen in a few iPhone examples that attributes have used an underscore _ in front of the variable. Does anyone know what this means? or how it works? an interface file I'm using looks like … the above does but when I try to set the mission name like: aMission.missionName = missionName; I get the error: request for member 'missionName' in something not a structure or union …
asked may 4 '09 by Atma
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name as the property, but with an underscore prefix. For a property called firstName, for example, the synthesized instance variable will be called _firstName. However, later, it says: Important … : If you use @synthesize without specifying an instance variable name, like this: @synthesize firstName; the instance variable will bear the same name as the property. In this example, the instance …
asked jul 17 by Cupidvogel
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to the variable names. While i realize that this is due to an established convention, I wonder: Is there any significance whether underscore precedes or completes variable name? For example take _name, name and name_ As Objective-C programmer, what if anything, does underscore signify to you? … Possible Duplicate: Prefixing property names with an underscore in Objective C In Objective-C book i am reading and in some of the code i saw, sometimes, people add underscores
asked jul 30 '11 by Jam
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I've previously avoided underscores in my variable names, perhaps a holdover from my college Java days. So when I define a property in Objective C this is what I naturally do. // In the header … = _myStringProperty; Should I get over my aversion to the underscore because that is the one way it should be done, is there a good reason for this style being the preferred one? Update: With automatic …
asked aug 19 '10 by mbehan
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Possible Duplicate: Prefixing property names with an underscore in Objective C I am a C/C++ developer and am learning Objective-C. Recently I started on a tutorial that I found on net … = coordinate; } return self; } @end Can anyone please explain me the meaning of the statement @synthesize coordinate=_coordinate; I know the meaning of @synthesize. But could not understand the complete statement. _coordinate is a member variable. But what is coordinate? Where is it declared? …
asked apr 14 '11 by user654034
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Possible Duplicates: How does an underscore in front of a variable in a cocoa objective-c class work? Prefixing property names with an underscore in Objective C Why do a lot of Objective … -C programmers put underscores before instance variables (even if they never even access them directly anywhere from their code)? What's the logic behind that? …
asked aug 18 '11 by tux91
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variable directly by its name, such as [_window makeKeyAndVisible]; or, preferably, use the accessor method: [self.window makeKeyAndVisible]; Why does self.window not need the underscore when the other methods do? … for an instance variable name. So any references you see in the template code generated by Xcode to variables starting with a _ are referencing the instance variables directly by name. When you see …
asked jul 26 '12 by stumped
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I was reading the posts about prefixing underscores infront of instance variables in Objective C. Especially the following posts, Prefixing property names with an underscore in Objective C How … does an underscore in front of a variable in a cocoa objective-c class work? As I understand when we are using underscores we are directly accessing the ivar instead of using accessors. How this would …
asked apr 7 by rustylepord
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Underscores are used just to be sure that you won't overlap method names, so if you are safe in naming of your variables you don't need to …
answered apr 2 '11 by Amar Kulo
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Why in the newest version of Xcode (dp-4) are variables declared with retain,nonatomic made to use the underscore before the variable name? Does this create some sort of type safety? For example, I … create a property: @property (retain, nonatomic) IBOutlet UILabel *name; Unless I change the variable inside the dealloc to not have the _, I have to do: @synthesize name = _name; Why is this? …
asked jan 2 '13 by GoGauchos
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self._frame to access the property through the setter, or to use __frame to access the variable directly: if (self) { __frame = frame; } Even better, rename the property to something with no underscores, to be consistent with how Apple recommends to name properties. … When you declare a property called _frame (one underscore), Objective-C synthesizes a getter, a setter, and an instance variable called __frame (two underscores). Change your assignment to either use …
answered jun 30 by dasblinkenlight
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Possible Duplicate: Underscore prefix on property name? What does this mean? @synthesize window=_window; I know that in general it means that 'some class' has a window, but why use _window instead of just window? Is this a namespace thing? …
asked may 18 '11 by lampShade

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