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23

Exact same thing, just omit the -c option. Apache's docs on it here. Also, htpasswd typically isn't run as root. It's typically owned by either the web server, or the owner of the files being served. If you're using root to edit it instead of logging in as one of those users, that's acceptable (I suppose), but you'll want to be careful to make sure you ...


15

You must supply the complete path to your password file, not the relative path from DocumentRoot. If DocumentRoot is /var/www and the password file is /var/www/webroot/.htpasswd, you must say AuthUserFile /var/www/webroot/.htpasswd in your .htaccess file. Said that, you shouldn't put your password file anywhere accessible in your DocumentRoot. Better ...


13

You can sort of kludge this by using mod_setenvif along with the mod_auth modules. Use the SetEnvIfNoCase directive to set which host is password protected. You'll need a couple of extra directives to satisfy access: # Check for the hostname here SetEnvIfNoCase HOST ^test\.mysite\.com\.?(:80)?$ PROTECTED_HOST Then inside the Directory block (or just out ...


12

This should work: AuthUserFile /www/.htpasswd AuthName "Locked" AuthType Basic Require valid-user SetEnvIf Host yourdomain.com secure_content Order Allow,Deny Allow from all Deny from env=secure_content Satisfy Any I was on the same route as @Anders Lindahl but apparently there is no "not" in SetEnvIf so I had do change it to allow from all and deny ...


11

I just had the same issue, was driving me nuts for the last hour. I can confirm that Steve's suggestion to enter the password in the command line works - so in my case "htpasswd -b passwordfile user password" did the trick. Here is the relevant bug report at Apache.


8

Did you create your password with 'htpasswd'? htpasswd in httpd-2.4.4 is broken (https://issues.apache.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=54735). As I understand it, the problem is specific to htpasswd in httpd-2.4.4, and only occurs if you enter the password manually, so you can work around the issue by doing one of: supply the password on the command line ...


8

you may put your Auth settings into a Environment. Like: SetEnvIf HTTP_HOST testsite.local APPLICATION_ENV=development <IfDefine !APPLICATION_ENV> Allow from all AuthType Basic AuthName "My Testseite - Login" AuthUserFile /Users/tho/htdocs/wgh_staging/.htpasswd Require user username </IfDefine> The Auth is working, but I couldn't ...


8

Try adding Allow from env=REDIRECT_noauth


8

I had problems implementing Jon's solution: Although I am quite familiar with Apache conf and regular expressions, the authentication always fired. From a quick analyzes it looked like the Allow from env=!PROTECTED_HOST line did not kick in. But I found another solution that actually looks safer to me: I created two virtual hosts for the two domains ...


7

The keywords you are looking for are: htaccess, htpasswd, .htaccess. (Providing you use apache) Ultimately you will put a .htaccess file in the dir you want to protect, and let it check the requirements with your htpasswdfile. For example: on my server I don't want people seeing my private directory. $ sudo htpasswd -c /etc/apache2/.htpasswd benjamin ...


7

This problem is almost always because apache cannot read the .htpasswd file. There are four causes that come to mind: it isn't parsing the path correctly... how did you create the .htaccess file? Does it have unix line endings (versus say using Notepad in Windows? is the path correct? What does the following command (with the path update) show? ls -l ...


6

Unfortunately <Location> directive isn't allowed in .htaccess. But there is an alternate neat solution using mod_setenvif. # set env variable SECURED if current URI is /c/sofas/ SetEnvIfNoCase Request_URI "^/c/sofas/" SECURED # invoke basic auth is SECURED is set AuthType Basic AuthName "My Protected Area" AuthUserFile /full/path/to/passwords ...


5

We're using IfDefine together with a apache2 command line parameter: .htaccess (suitable for both development and live systems): <IfDefine !development> AuthType Basic AuthName "Say the secret word" AuthUserFile /var/www/hostname/.htpasswd Require valid-user </IfDefine> Development server configuration (Debian) Append the following ...


5

By default htpasswd uses the standard crypt function and thus passwords are already salted - note in this example that both users have the same password yet the hashes are different: simon@diablo:~$ htpasswd -b -c htpasswd simon abcd Adding password for user simon simon@diablo:~$ htpasswd -b htpasswd simon2 abcd Adding password for user simon2 ...


5

Documentation says: htpasswd encrypts passwords using either a version of MD5 modified for Apache, or the system's crypt() routine. Files managed by htpasswd may contain both types of passwords; some user records may have MD5-encrypted passwords while others in the same file may have passwords encrypted with crypt(). I think you can explicitly ...


5

1) Note that it is considered insecure to have the .htpasswd file below the server root. 2) The docs say this about relative paths, so it looks you're out of luck: File-path is the path to the user file. If it is not absolute (i.e., if it doesn't begin with a slash), it is treated as relative to the ServerRoot. 3) While the answers recommending the ...


4

Two things come to mind. Is .htpasswd readable by the web server user? Do you know if Apache is set with AllowOverride all to allow .htaccess to operate as intended?


4

Here's a solution similar to what Jon Lin proposed, but using RewriteCond to check the host name: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} =protected.hostname.com RewriteRule ^.*$ - [E=DENY:1] AuthUserFile /path/to/htpasswd AuthName "Password please" AuthType Basic Order Deny,Allow Satisfy any Deny from all Require valid-user Allow from env=!DENY


3

Heureka, I figured it out myself.. or what I think to be the solution. <VirtualHost (ip address):80> ServerName my.domain DocumentRoot /var/sites/sitename/ ServerAdmin ... <Directory /var/sites/sitename/> AuthUserFile /etc/apache2/.htpasswd AuthGroupFile /dev/null AuthName "What is the pw" AuthType Basic require ...


3

You can execute this command with system or exec to add your users. I've created a code snippet that might work for you: <?php define('HTPASSFILEPATH', '.htpasswd'); function addUser($pUser, $pPass) { exec("htpasswd -cb " . HTPASSFILEPATH . " ${pUser} ${pPass}"); } ?> And remember, the htpasswd tool should be in your PATH


3

I doubt that your .htpasswd file is really located at the very root of the server's filesystem along with /bin, /usr, /home, and others (rather than inside the part of the filesystem served to web browsers). According to Apache documentation (1, 2), AuthUserFile expects a file path (as if you were in ServerRoot, usually /usr/apache or similar, and trying to ...


3

You can specify a password on the command line using the -b flag. #!/bin/bash PASSWORD=`tr -dc a-z0-9_ < /dev/urandom | head -c 10` htpasswd -cb /var/.htpasswd testuser $PASSWORD echo Password set to: $PASSWORD # output: # Adding password for user testuser # Password set to: gzu00n4lp8 For clarification, here's a version using expect: #!/bin/bash ...


3

.htaccess files are used for applying specific configuration directives to the directories in which they are located. It is not possible to use one .htaccess file to specify different configurations for different directories. You either need to put your access controls in the server/vhost configuration file or use one .htaccess per directory.


3

"I think you can explicitly specify apache to use md5s for password in htpasswd file using -m argument to htpasswd" I just found out the exact opposite in Ubuntu 12.04 and newer, it defaults to md5 and you have to use the -d flag to get it to use Crypt. This might be the case elsewhere too, I can't seem to find a version number for htpasswd.


3

You're basically right. You can set an environment variable using SetEnv: SetEnv ENVIRONMENT_TYPE "DEV" Additionally, given that htaccess is parsed from server configuration down through the relevant directories until the directory that Apache thinks the request can be served from, you can use previously defined environment variables in other htaccess ...


3

You'll need to create a php page. This answer has an example of the code you need: $username = $_POST['user']; $password = $_POST['pass']; $new_username = $_POST['newuser']; $new_password = $_POST['newpass']; $action = $_POST['action']; //read the file into an array $lines = explode("\n", file_get_contents('.htpasswd')); //read the array and change the ...


3

If you have a folder called "filesForAnyUser" and a folder where you have files only for admin, you need to make 2 htaccess files. One in "filesForAnyUser": AuthType Basic AuthName "restricted" AuthUserFile E:\\path\\to\\.htpasswd Require valid-user And one in the other directory: AuthType Basic AuthName "restricted" AuthUserFile E:\\path\\to\\.htpasswd ...


3

You can use SetEnvIf along with the Satisfy Any in mod_authz: SetEnvIfNoCase HOST ^www\.example2014\.com(:80)?$ PROTECTED_HOST AuthUserFile /var/www/htpasswd AuthName "Password Protected" AuthType Basic Order Deny,Allow Satisfy any Deny from all Require valid-user Allow from env=!PROTECTED_HOST This sets an environment variable "PROTECTED_HOST" if the ...


3

app.js var request = require('request'); request.get('http://url.com', callback).auth('username', 'password', false); function callback(err, response, body) { console.log(body); } terminal: npm install request node app.js document: https://github.com/mikeal/request



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