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49

What level of security does this provide? .htpasswd does not provide much security by itself. That is, it provides a login mechanism, and Apache will not respond without the proper credentials, but unless separately configured, nothing about the exchange is encrypted (or even obfuscated). For example, listening to the GET request with Wireshark gives you a ...


33

Exact same thing, just omit the -c option. Apache's docs on it here. Also, htpasswd typically isn't run as root. It's typically owned by either the web server, or the owner of the files being served. If you're using root to edit it instead of logging in as one of those users, that's acceptable (I suppose), but you'll want to be careful to make sure you ...


22

.httpasswd files are just text files with a specific format depending on the hash function specified. If you are using MD5 they look like this: foo:$apr1$y1cXxW5l$3vapv2yyCXaYz8zGoXj241 That's the login, a colon, ,$apr1$, the salt and 1000 times md5 encoded as base64. If you select SHA1 they look like this: foo:{SHA}BW6v589SIg3i3zaEW47RcMZ+I+M= That's ...


20

Browsers usually don't support this, see How do I log out? Since browsers first started implementing basic authentication, website administrators have wanted to know how to let the user log out. Since the browser caches the username and password with the authentication realm, as described earlier in this tutorial, this is not a function of ...


20

You must supply the complete path to your password file, not the relative path from DocumentRoot. If DocumentRoot is /var/www and the password file is /var/www/webroot/.htpasswd, you must say AuthUserFile /var/www/webroot/.htpasswd in your .htaccess file. Said that, you shouldn't put your password file anywhere accessible in your DocumentRoot. Better ...


18

Things I would check: Permissions on `/etc/nginx/.htpasswd` - Can the file be read by the account running nginx? You could try, temporarily, using `chmod 644` to make sure everyone can read it. If that works, then you can sort out an appropriate combination of `chown` and `chmod` settings so that nginx and you/root can read it but other users cannot (for ...


16

I just had the same issue, was driving me nuts for the last hour. I can confirm that Steve's suggestion to enter the password in the command line works - so in my case "htpasswd -b passwordfile user password" did the trick. Here is the relevant bug report at Apache.


15

You can sort of kludge this by using mod_setenvif along with the mod_auth modules. Use the SetEnvIfNoCase directive to set which host is password protected. You'll need a couple of extra directives to satisfy access: # Check for the hostname here SetEnvIfNoCase HOST ^test\.mysite\.com\.?(:80)?$ PROTECTED_HOST Then inside the Directory block (or just out ...


14

The Apache htpasswd file does not support any shadow functionality. Therefor you have to prevent the users accessing your web server in order to keep them away from the password file. So the only solution is your SSH based approach or any other remote solution. The following description will explain how to write a SSH command script to change the password ...


13

This should work: AuthUserFile /www/.htpasswd AuthName "Locked" AuthType Basic Require valid-user SetEnvIf Host yourdomain.com secure_content Order Allow,Deny Allow from all Deny from env=secure_content Satisfy Any I was on the same route as @Anders Lindahl but apparently there is no "not" in SetEnvIf so I had do change it to allow from all and deny ...


13

You'd use, in a .htaccess file in the assets/ directory: Satisfy Any Order Allow,Deny Allow from all See the examples here: http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/mod/core.html#require


12

The passwords generated by "htpasswd" use a random salt, to make it harder to guess. It also means that pre-crypted dictionaries for attacks have to be much larger since they have to crypt every possible password with every possible salt. htpasswd uses crypt(3) behind the scenes.


11

It is only possible in firefox. What you do is send the user to http://logout:logout@example.com/logout. This will replace their current username/password and since they now have the wrong username/password, they can't do anything. On opera this does not work, because you can have several usernames/passwords at the same time. It didn't work on IE either, ...


11

This problem is almost always because apache cannot read the .htpasswd file. There are four causes that come to mind: it isn't parsing the path correctly... how did you create the .htaccess file? Does it have unix line endings (versus say using Notepad in Windows? is the path correct? What does the following command (with the path update) show? ls -l ...


11

Did you create your password with 'htpasswd'? htpasswd in httpd-2.4.4 is broken (https://issues.apache.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=54735). As I understand it, the problem is specific to htpasswd in httpd-2.4.4, and only occurs if you enter the password manually, so you can work around the issue by doing one of: supply the password on the command line ...


10

Try adding Allow from env=REDIRECT_noauth


9

I'd say always the login form (by which I assume you mean standard session-based authentication). .htaccess authentication transmits the password on every request (Of course, SSL would help here) .htaccess authentication doesn't have any rate limiting / brute-force protection by default in Apache Logging out from .htaccess authentication is a bitch


9

I had problems implementing Jon's solution: Although I am quite familiar with Apache conf and regular expressions, the authentication always fired. From a quick analyzes it looked like the Allow from env=!PROTECTED_HOST line did not kick in. But I found another solution that actually looks safer to me: I created two virtual hosts for the two domains ...


8

Actually, you don't need access to httpd.conf: ps aux | grep apache2 groups apache_user should yield what You want


8

you may put your Auth settings into a Environment. Like: SetEnvIf HTTP_HOST testsite.local APPLICATION_ENV=development <IfDefine !APPLICATION_ENV> Allow from all AuthType Basic AuthName "My Testseite - Login" AuthUserFile /Users/tho/htdocs/wgh_staging/.htpasswd Require user username </IfDefine> The Auth is working, but I couldn't ...


8

We're using IfDefine together with an apache2 command line parameter: .htaccess (suitable for both development and live systems): <IfDefine !development> AuthType Basic AuthName "Say the secret word" AuthUserFile /var/www/hostname/.htpasswd Require valid-user </IfDefine> Development server configuration (Debian) Append the following ...


7

You probably have a .htaccess in your document root, so you would add to this file since it's the first so to speak -- if you want to protect the entire website. Otherwise add a .htaccess file in the directory you wish to protect. Then, check out this howto: http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/howto/auth.html In a nutshell, this is what you add: AuthType ...


7

You just need the following to get the username that is currently in use for an authenticated session: $_SERVER['PHP_AUTH_USER'] rev1 In light of @Ben's comment I've now found the section in the PHP documentation at HTTP authentication with PHP that explains what's going on: As of PHP 4.3.0, in order to prevent someone from writing a script which ...


7

1) Note that it is considered insecure to have the .htpasswd file below the server root. 2) The docs say this about relative paths, so it looks you're out of luck: File-path is the path to the user file. If it is not absolute (i.e., if it doesn't begin with a slash), it is treated as relative to the ServerRoot. 3) While the answers recommending the ...


7

The keywords you are looking for are: htaccess, htpasswd, .htaccess. (Providing you use apache) Ultimately you will put a .htaccess file in the dir you want to protect, and let it check the requirements with your htpasswdfile. For example: on my server I don't want people seeing my private directory. $ sudo htpasswd -c /etc/apache2/.htpasswd benjamin ...


6

I found this on the web which seems to work! The problem is that accessing protected content makes Apache send a 401 header. I had to put the following in the .htaccess file which was located in the protected directory. ErrorDocument 401 "Unauthorized Access" RewriteEngine off


6

If you are able to, you should think about upgrading to Apache 2.4 (or the latest 2.3 beta build since 2.4 isn't quite released yet). One of the new features available are Authorization Containers - making it much simpler to define access requirements using the Require directive. You should end up with something like: AuthName "Restricted Area" AuthType ...


6

scheme://username:password@host/path


6

The digest authentication method uses a different type of password file. You can't use a password file generated for BASIC to use with DIGEST. You need to use the htdigest command (or some equivalent online digest file generator) to create the password file.


6

Unfortunately <Location> directive isn't allowed in .htaccess. But there is an alternate neat solution using mod_setenvif. # set env variable SECURED if current URI is /c/sofas/ SetEnvIfNoCase Request_URI "^/c/sofas/" SECURED # invoke basic auth is SECURED is set AuthType Basic AuthName "My Protected Area" AuthUserFile /full/path/to/passwords ...



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