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25

Adding <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> addresses the symptom, but is not appropriate for all circumstances. Having ran around this issue a few times, I hope to help others not only overcome the problem but understand it. (Which becomes more and more important as IIS 6 fades into myth and rumor.) Background: This issue and ...


12

<!-- This Id value indicates the application supports Windows Threshold functionality--> <supportedOS Id="{8e0f7a12-bfb3-4fe8-b9a5-48fd50a15a9a}"/> Source: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/azure/en-US/07cbfc3a-bced-45b7-80d2-a9d32a7c95d4/supportedos-manifest-for-windows-10?forum=windowsgeneraldevelopmentissues


11

The exception clearly identifies some .NET 2.0.50727 component was included in .NET 4.0. In App.config file use this: <startup useLegacyV2RuntimeActivationPolicy="true"> It solved my problem


10

You're problem is that you are creating only one Random instance. By default, if you do not supply a seed number, the current time will be used as a seed. However, you're code is executing so quickly, that the same time is being used as a seed (because you're code is executing faster than the smallest resolution of the clock), so the number you receive is ...


9

One of the proposals in C# 6 would be to add a new Null Propogation operator. This will (hopefully) allow you to write: var obj = msg?.Content?.AccountMarketMessage?.Account?.sObject; if (obj == null) return; Unfortunately, there is nothing in the language at this point that handles this.


9

You need to run a trace on SQL Server instead of debugging this from the C# side. This will show you everything both A and B are executing on the server. The execution plan does you no good because it's precisely that - just a plan. You want to see the exact statements and their actual performance metrics. In the rare event you were to tell me that both ...


9

It depends on 4.5, but this works. public class PeriodicTask { public static async Task Run(Action action, TimeSpan period, CancellationToken cancellationToken) { while(!cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested) { await Task.Delay(period, cancellationToken); action(); } } public static ...


8

A new feature coming up in C# 6 is the inclusion of extension Add methods. This is one of those features that has always existed in VB.net and is finally making it's way to C#. Now, you'll be able to add extension methods to any collection type named Add() and it will be used in collection initializer expressions. Now you won't have to derive from your ...


8

This is the most important thing to know about the Tuple type. Tuple is a class, not a struct. It thus will be allocated upon the managed heap. Each class instance that is allocated adds to the burden of garbage collection. Note: The properties Item1, Item2, and further do not have setters. You cannot assign them. The Tuple is immutable once created in ...


8

or try regex: x = Regex.Replace(x, "^90*", "");


8

Tasks can be used to represent operations taking place on multiple threads, but they don't have to. One can write complex TPL applications that only ever execute in a single thread. When you have a task that, for example, represents a network request for some data, that task is not going to create additional threads to accomplish that goal. Such a program ...


7

Since version is a string, you're hitting the overload of WriteLine that accepts a category as its second parameter. While there are any number of hacks to get around this behavior (I'll include a few below, for fun) I would personally prefer your solution as the preferable way of clearly ensuring that the string is treated as a format string. Some other ...


7

AsParallel() returns a ParallelQuery, so if you call AsParallel().Any(...) you're not calling Enumerable.Any, but ParallelEnumerable.Any. The reference source code for ParallelEnumerable.Any is here. When you dig e.g. into the AnyAllSearchOperatorEnumerator class, you see that a flag called resultFoundFlag is used to tell other workers that a result is ...


7

The WinDbg command 'g' means [Continue] Since you're opening a dump-file there is no way to 'continue', it only contains the process memory. So the message " No runnable debuggees error in 'g' " is logical in your case since the process is not running. Concerning loading the correct version of SOS use the following command depending on the .NET version. ...


6

This is the DebuggerDisplayAttribute You can use it in your classes like [DebuggerDisplay("Name = {Name}, Id = {Id}")] public class MyClass { public string Name { get; set; } public int Id { get; set; } }


6

This is probably happening because the value of i is not closed within the loop - when the loop exits, i will have a value of 2 and then t[i] will be evaluated because of deferred execution. One solution is to create a closing variable within the loop: int minDim = someValues.Min(t => t.GetLength(0)); // 2 IOrderedEnumerable<string[]> ...


6

It's the same problem as lots of people had with foreach loops pre C# 5. orderedValues = orderedValues.ThenBy(t => t[i]); The value of i will not be evaluated until you call .ToList() at which point it is 2 since that's the exit condition of the for loop. You can introduce a new local variable inside the for-loop to fix it: for (int i = 1; i < ...


6

Most Task-returning methods are intended for use with async/await (and as such should not use Task.Run or Task.Factory.StartNew internally). Note that with the common way of calling asynchronous methods, it doesn't matter how the exception is thrown: await CheckWebPageAsync(); The difference only comes in when the method is called and then awaited later: ...


6

My guess would be that you overloaded the == operator. The result of Object.Equals(i, null) could confirm that. If you are overloading the == operator, it's possible your logic is incorrectly handling the null case.


6

The Task.Delay statement seems to have no effect in the latter case, can i not use it without await keyword? Well you can't use it without doing something with the result. Task.Delay just returns a task that will complete later on. That's all it does. It doesn't - in itself - "do" anything to the current thread. Using await then schedules a callback to ...


5

I had an application that used ConcurrentQueue<T>.TryPeek to good effect. One thread was set up to monitor the queue. Mostly it was looking at queue size, but we also wanted to get an idea of latency. Because the items in the queue had a time stamp field that said what time they were put into the queue, my monitoring thread could call TryPeek to get ...


5

The boolean values overload for TypeConverterOption is used only when reading. It allows you to specify multiple values that can be used for true/false when reading. So you could do 1, "true", "TRUE", "True", "yes", etc. Currently the only way to do it when writing is to create a custom type converter. public class MyBooleanConverter : DefaultTypeConverter ...


5

That's because v3.0 requires 4.0.3 of the .NET framework (which most people are already using).


5

It is pretty important to understand why this is behaving the way it does, you are liable to get yourself into trouble when you rely in the CloseReason too much. This is not a bug, it is a restriction due to the way Windows was designed. One core issue is the way the WM_CLOSE message is formulated, it is the one that sets the train in motion, first firing ...


5

Technically, you need to match SOS version to all 4 version places of the CLR and the DAC (mscordacwks.dll). However, these are both .NET 4.5 versions, so you should be safe to ignore this warning. In order to resolve it, you need to get SOS.dll from the installation where the dump was taken.


5

Process class is heavily cached. You'll get only cached result, no matter how many times you read some property unless you throw a call to Refresh method. You need to call Process.Refresh to get the non cached result. To quote from msdn When a Process component is associated with a process resource, the property values of the Process are immediately ...


5

You're looking at the wrong code. AsParallel returns a ParallelQuery<TSource>, and ParellelQuery has another overload for Any. 'Any' creates a new AnyAllSearchOperator object and aggregates it. If you dig deeper into that chain of method calls and objects you'll find that the QueryOpeningEnumerator does support cancellation. Unfortunately the ...


5

n is a copy of your current value in the list not a reference to your value.If you want to manipulate the values in your list then use a for loop for(int i = 0; i<numbers.Count; i++) numbers[i] *= 5; More detailed explanation: With a normal foreach loop your code doesn't even compile: foreach(var n in numbers) n = n * 5; // Readonly local ...


5

Just select the entries, filter based on the values, then project to the keys: var keys = dic.Where(entry => entry.Value > 5) .Select(entry => entry.Key); Note that this approach is fine for any IDictionary<,> - the fact that you've got a ConcurrentDictionary<,> is irrelevant here.


5

The JsonConvert.DeserializeObject will convert your Json to a JArray rather than an Array - update your check to: if (result is JArray)



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