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38

C# 1 or 2: private static ArrayList alFileTypes = new ArrayList(new string[] {"css","gif","htm","html","txt","xml"}); C# 3 using an implicitly typed array: private static ArrayList alFileTypes = new ArrayList(new[] {"css","gif","htm","html","txt","xml"}); C# 3 using a collection initializer: private static ArrayList alFileTypes = new ...


23

Netduino (and other HW boards, including GHI's FEZ products) are HW devices with an MicroProcessor running .NET Microframework - but in an form factor that resembles Ardunio, meaning you can plug other boards (or shields) on top of the mainboard to extend its functionality. .NET Gadgeteer is something different: .NET Gadgeteer Hardware A .NET Gadgeteer ...


18

Use all 4 displays at once for each number, showing it in binary. Blink all 4 really fast for a 0, light all 4 longer to denote a point. [ ] [ ] [ ] [x] # 1 [x] [ ] [ ] [x] # 9 [ ] [ ] [x] [ ] # 2 [x] [x] [x] [x] # . (long) [ ] [ ] [ ] [x] # 1 [ ] [x] [x] [ ] # 6 [x] [ ] [ ] [ ] # 8 [x] [x] [x] [x] # . (long) [x] [x] [x] [x] # 0 (short) Alternatively you ...


18

This looks very cool. And only 30$. http://www.netduino.com/ And this Plus version with ethernet. http://www.netduino.com/netduinoplus/


18

Is there some way to turn off support for Generics in VS2010 so that the compiler will flag the offending line ? Yes, but it is a "nuclear" option: using System.Collections.Generic; class Test { static void Main() { IEnumerable<int> x = null; } } C:\> csc /langversion:ISO-1 \foo.cs Microsoft (R) Visual C# 2010 Compiler ...


16

You should use a List<T>. Using Array.Resize will force you to expand the array separately each time you add an item, making your code much slower. (since arrays cannot have spare capacity) A List<T> is backed by an array, but holds spare capacity to put items into. All it needs to do to add an item is to set an element in the array and ...


15

This doesn't answer your question about getting a better time resolution, but it does solve your problem with changing the brightness on an LED. You should be using the PWM module for the Netduino. Netduino Basics: Using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) is a great article on how to use it.


13

Based on my tests, I'm guessing ValueTypes in the Micro Framework are not true value types as we're used to on the desktop CLR. At the very least, they are being boxed. And there may be another level of indirection involved too. These costs are incurred in a (quite substantial for an embedded platform) memory overhead. I'll be converting to an int[] in my ...


12

Clearly, if (resp == null) then you still need to return something...


11

No, don't use an ArrayList of char values. That will box every char - performance will be horrible, as will memory usage. (Size of a reference + size of a boxed char for each character... yikes!) Use a char[] internally and "resize" it (create a new array and copy the contents in) when you need to, perhaps doubling in size each time. (EDIT: You don't resize ...


11

Netduino Go was recently released...supporting both Arduino Shield and Gadgeteer module pin compatibility. It also supports plug-and-play go!bus modules. A few clarifications on Gadgeteer and Netduino: Gadgeteer, from a hardware perspective, is a pin-assignment technology like Arduino Shields. There's a similar level of simplicity/complexity to it as ...


10

You can do string[] lines = doc.Split('\n'); for (int i = 0; i < lines.Length; i+= 1) lines[i] = lines[i].Trim(); Assuming that the µF supports Trim() at all. Trim() will remove all whitespace, that might be useful. Otherwise use TrimEnd('\r')


9

Honestly, if I were you (which I'm not, by the way), I'd stick it out and avoid the high-level abstraction of the .NET platform for an embedded system. The way I learned was via a college course where I was first introduced to embedded systems concepts on a SunROM kit (similar to an Arduino board, and also containing an ATmega32 MCU) in AVR assembly ...


9

All of the other answers are excellent, but I would just like to add that for a beginner, a framework such as .NET Micro might abstract away some very important concepts; it might get you too removed from your hardware. The joy (and real skill) of embedded programming comes in exploiting the hardware and architecture of your microcontroller. If you're using ...


8

Without knowing your application and the current capability of the embedded device it will be hard for me to give a definitive opinion if .NET MF is up to the task. If the embedded device is a low power 8-bit CPU with 2K of RAM and 32K of ROM then the .NET MF would not be suitable for that design. In a large number of cases the move to .NET MF would involve ...


8

I have had a similar problem in the past and used the following method to time in the microsecond range. The first line determines how many ticks are in a millisecond (its been a while since I used this, but I think 1 tick was 10 microseconds). The second line gets the amount of time the system has been on (in ticks). I hope this helps. public const ...


8

Use Trace, it designs to do what you need. using System; using System.Diagnostics; class Test { static void Main() { Trace.Listeners.Add(new TextWriterTraceListener("yourlog.log")); Trace.AutoFlush = true; Trace.Indent(); Trace.WriteLine("Entering Main"); Console.WriteLine("Hello World."); ...


7

I don't have any hands on experience but based on http://www.microsoft.com/netmf/about/gettingstarted.mspx The smallest footprint supported is 64kb RAM, 256kb Flash and MMU is not required. Therefore your applications needs would be the determining factor. FYI: the .NET Micro Framework was released as Open Source under the Apache 2.0 License November 16, ...


7

The .NET Micro Framework is targeted for embedded systems that contain a powerful processor (currently ARM7, ARM9 and Blackfin). The Arduino board is based on an 8-bit AVR microcontroller for which the .NET Micro Framework isn't even available. Consider for example the memory requirements of the framework: It is advertised to consume as low as about 300 kB ...


7

I'd do the reverse. From a control station, I would bring up a list of all IPs used by my devices. I'd then select one to start blinking in a pattern that would be easy to recognize (like 1 2 3 4 over and over) until shut off. That way I could ask everybody who's LEDs are blinking like that and know what device owned that IP. I'd then write the IP on ...


7

Netduino looks very cool. And it's only 30 USD. And the Plus version with Ethernet.


7

From the Netduino forums: Soon, we'll be launching an open source project to port the .NET Micro Framework SDK to Mono for use on Mac and Linux. They have released the first alpha release of MFDeploy for Mono (Mac and Linux).


7

Netduino is built with the open source hardware movement in mind and is compatible with existing Arduino shields while allowing you to use the .NET Micro framework to program it. This allows you to leverage existing experience with .NET on that platform instead of having to go through another language. .NET Gadgeteer is a completely different take on the ...


7

if ((latch_state & 0x1) != 0) should work. Normally, C++ conditions which don't evaluate to a boolean are doing an implicit comparison to 0, with 'true' being that the expression is not 0.


6

Check Scott's Hanselminutes Session at http://www.hanselman.com/blog/HanselminutesOn9TheNETMicroFrameworkWithColinMiller.aspx


6

Please check following overviews: Microsoft .NET Micro Framework Tools & Resources Production Modules Comparison Table I personally like the Thaoe-II and ChipworX most, for old .NET MF version I was really happy with the Digi ConnectME.


6

Provide a well-mounted cord for the user to swing the device around in the air like a lasso Then flash the LEDs like a propeller clock


6

There's no such specific compiler switch. You can take a look at the source code (or the decompiled source) and search for usages of generics. Generics can be declared in your project or generic constructs (classes, methods, variables, ...) can be used by your project. You might want to use reflection to look for generic declarations (classes, methods, ...


6

The simple, brute force method is to loop over every voxel in the grid and calculate its distance from the sphere center. Then color the voxel if its distance is less than the sphere radius. You can save a lot of instructions by eliminating the square root and comparing the dot product to the radius squared. Pretty far from optimal, sure. But on an 8x8x8 ...


5

If you're using .NET 2.0 or greater, you should be using the generic List<T> type (even if it's List<object>, which would given you the same functionality as ArrayList). If you're using .NET 3.5 or greater, you can use this syntax: private static List<string> fileTypes = new List<string>() { "css","gif","htm","html","txt","xml" ...



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