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22

Debuggers are not real measure when try to compare the performance , here is what I did and got WCF Kicking out Remoting from the ring ;) 1) Also modified your test to run it from same program/exe namespace ConsoleApplication6 { [ServiceContract] internal interface IRemote { [OperationContract] string Hello(string name); } ...


21

Rethrowing as you've shown it shouldn't change the call stack, unless there's something very special about remoting exceptions. (I know there are some special aspects, but I don't think they come into play here.) This is the kind of thing which does lose information: catch(Exception e) { throw e; // Not throw; } My guess is that some developer has ...


18

If the error occurs after some time, it is possible that you doesn´t override the InitializeLifetimeService method of the base class MarshalByRefObject. By default, if you doesn´t override the method, the remote object is destroyed after some time (I think 5 minutes). If you override the method and return null, the object has an endless life time. public ...


18

Both support distributed applications. Web services are cross platform, using common standards and work through firewalls. They also think in terms of messages, not objects - you send a message to a service, and you get a reply. Remoting is an MS only technology which is not cross platform and talks in a binary format. It thinks in terms of objects, you ...


15

.NET Remoting applications can use the HTTP, TCP, and SMTP protocols whereas WCF can use named pipes and MSMQ as well along with all these protocols. You may find the best answer here: From .NET Remoting to the Windows Communication Foundation Conclusion As you have seen, a migration from .NET Remoting to WCF is not a task you have to be afraid ...


14

As far as I know, catch (Exception ex) { throw ex } resets the stack-trace. And just catch { throw; } does not. So if you don't perform any additional logic on error, e.g. logging, I don't know any reason to not remove that catch.


11

If, in addition to SSamra's code, you move the creation of your host outside of your WCF test (since, in my opinion you should only be creating the host just once) you can get even faster responses: static void Main(string[] args) { var address = "net.pipe://localhost/test"; host = new ServiceHost(typeof(Remote)); ...


9

See the MSDN White Paper on how to migrate from .NET remoting to WCF: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa730857%28v=vs.80%29.aspx WCF is the unified communications stacks that is intended to replace ASMX web services, .NET Remoting, WSE and a few other technologies, too.


8

You want to use the Queue class to set up a queue that your dummy threads populate with functions and that your main thread consumes. import Queue #somewhere accessible to both: callback_queue = Queue.Queue() def from_dummy_thread(func_to_call_from_main_thread): callback_queue.put(func_to_call_from_main_thread) def from_main_thread_blocking(): ...


6

Under .Net Remoting you have 3 ways of communicating by HTTP, TCP and IPC. If the commnuicatin is on the same pc I sugest using IPC channels it will speed up your calls.


6

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/61w7kz4b(v=vs.80).aspx In the .NET Framework, the default security level for distributed communication (remoting) is low. This affects passing the user-defined object type to remote methods. You might need to adjust the default security level to full in some cases to allow serialization of objects. If you're in ...


6

There are plenty of reasons to ditch remoting; a few might include: lack of transport flexibility versioning requirements are huge pain platform dependent (no sensible chance of cross-platform usage) no chance of usage from the growing mobile market lack of future development: whatever feature you want added - it won't be however, I would disagree that ...


6

Your lecturer is incorrect. foreach(var type in typeof(Uri).Assembly.GetTypes()) { if (type.IsAbstract) continue; if (!Attribute.IsDefined(type, typeof(SerializableAttribute))) continue; if (!typeof(MarshalByRefObject).IsAssignableFrom(type)) continue; Console.WriteLine(type.FullName); } shows (and note that I'm only looking at a single ...


5

WCF provides the ability to essentially do exactly what .NET Remoting does through the choice of binding you use when configuring your WCF service. WCF abstracts the idea of a service from the transport technology that is used to implement that service. You can define a WCF service and then change the transport technology used to provide that service ...


5

You may have a timeout. You can use the native interfaces to set timeout or you can override virtual object InitializeLifetimeService() If it's not a timeout issue, it may be that you had an error on the server-side. Try attaching your debugger to your server component and play with breakpoints and stepping, esp. in the constructor.


5

+1 for the effort in the question. I believe this may just be because your CameraContainer isn't a MarshalByRefObject. Because it's attaching to the event, the AppDomain containing the CameraManager effectively needs to call back into the primary AppDomain when the event is raised.


5

The problem was the Cisco CSS. We determined this by pointing the tier 1 servers directly to the tier 2 servers and going 48 hours without observing the problem. Once we determined it was the CSS, we corrected this problem by adjusting the insanely low default value for this parameter: "Default flow inactivity timeouts, in seconds, for the TCP or UDP ...


5

Did you solve this? I've had exactly the same problem last week. (A slight unpublicised side-effect of nunit is that it fires up the default "tcp" channel when loading your dlls to run unit tests (my problem)... then I was creating a custom TcpClientChannel instance with custom sinks to talk to our server software... and our sinks weren't firing when I ...


5

It appears to me that WCF is going to make a local copy (by value) of the remote object which means it will not be on the lab computer and therefore unable to interact with the hardware that is attached This is almost completely incorrect. There is no "copying" being done across machines. In fact the whole terminology around the "remote object" no ...


4

Well, a secure TCP channel (suppoert starting with .NET 2) uses SSPI to encrypt the data. http://www.codeguru.com/columns/dotnet/article.php/c10253 According to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_Support_Provider_Interface The "Secure channel" is using differen encrpytions depending on the OS support, but SSL/TLS is part of it.


4

BITS (background Intelligent Transfer Service) is a good solution. It has years of experience built in Some starting points are http://sharpbits.codeplex.com/ http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/Managed_BITS.aspx http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc188766.aspx http://www.simple-talk.com/dotnet/.net-tools/using-bits-to-upload-files-with-.net/


4

In short, no there are no quick wins here. Personally I would not make MyComponent (as a DTO) a MarshalByRefObject (which is presumably the problem), as those round trips are going to cripple you. I would keep it as a regular class, and just move a few key methods to pump them around (i.e. have a MarshalByRef manager/repository/etc class). That should ...


4

Based on this solution, you could make your Task class task inherit from MarshalByRefObject as well. This would solve the serialization issue as it would pass a cross-AppDomain serialized reference which would be used to attach to the event. public class ScanningTask : MarshalByRefObject { private class Loader : MarshalByRefObject { public ...


4

In certain situations related to code access security the catch-rethrow clause can be a necessary security feature. But I doubt it applies here. Especially since no sane person would use this pattern without adding a comment. The point of it is to prevent exception filters from running while having increased privileges. A few related articles: ...


4

Instead of using Serializable attribute, make your OtherClass inherit from MarshalByRefObject.


4

If your object "travelled" using (e.g.) serialization from another AppDomain to the current AppDomain then it has essentially been "created" in your current AppDomain. The source AppDomain could be a separate process on the current computer or another process on a remote computer. As far as I am aware, I don't think that the CLR keeps track of that for you, ...


4

.NET Remoting is now a legacy technology, quoted from MSDN: This topic is specific to a legacy technology that is retained for backward compatibility with existing applications and is not recommended for new development. Distributed applications should now be developed using the Windows Communication Foundation (WCF). And here is a performance ...


4

Check here: mystery RemotingException raised when changing Platform Target to Any CPU It seems to change the paths to the DLL's you want to access. Take a look at the paths in the linked question. They are well over 127 chars, and there is nothing you can do about it. Example: ...


4

Try to convert it to a byte array: public static byte[] ImageToByteArray(Image img) { byte[] byteArray = new byte[0]; using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream()) { img.Save(stream, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Png); stream.Close(); byteArray = stream.ToArray(); } return byteArray; } I believe you can ...


4

This is hard to answer. The entire concept of wanting to remote a component is a mystifying one. These design decisions were made 13+ years ago and clearly they had a very different idea of how remoting was going to be practical. Which didn't pan out that well, heavily re-engineered in .NET 3.0 Just noodling about this a bit without knowing the thinking ...



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