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19

That's not as crazy as you think. In fact, you can achieve this using AppDomains. Each AppDomain has its own storage location for static variables. So you can just create a second AppDomain in your process, and communicate between them using an object that inherit MarshalByRefObject like in this MSDN example.


10

The last one is preferable (although quite messy) In TAP (Task-based Asynchronous Pattern) A task (and other awaitables) represent an asynchronous operation. You have basically 3 options of handling these tasks: Wait synchronously (DoAsync().Result, DoAsync().Wait()) - Blocks the calling thread until the task is completed. Makes your application more ...


7

Use String.StartsWith "Determines whether the beginning of this string instance matches a specified string." string numbers = "000445454"; if (numbers.StartsWith("0")) //Do Something


7

While Lucas' suggestion on AppDomains would work, alternatively you could create this effect using generics, as a class with different generic type arguments is treated as a different class, and therefore has its own static fields. public class SomeClass<T> { public static string SomeField; } Then: SomeClass<int>.SomeField = "A"; ...


7

What's awaitable is the Task Task.Delay returns. Each method returning a Task/Task<TResult> is awaitable. async is just an implementation detail allowing you to use await in that method and the whole state machine it generates. More generally, every thing that has a GetAwaiter method (extension methods count as well) that return something that has ...


6

The UTC is time at some arbitrarily chosen area (Greenwich), adjusted by few seconds due to Earth orbiting irregularities. Local time is a time at specific point on Earth. For example, if the UTC time is 0:00 and you are in Cairo, you will observe 2:00, because the time zone in Cairo has an offset of 2 hours ahead (usually denoted "UTC+2"). For that ...


5

Well in fact System.IO.File.WriteAllLines is not an F# syntactic function. It's a static member, so it can be (and indeed it is) overloaded. Then the compiler doesn't know which overload to pick up, he just need an additional hint from you. You can either supply arguments: let write x y = System.IO.File.WriteAllLines(x, y) or some type annotations: let ...


5

// Convert the byte array to a Unicode string string serialisedByteArray = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetString(floats); You are converting floats to byte an then convert that to string ... a recipe for troubles. There are certain byte Sequences (look up Surrogate pair, a high surrogate is invalid if not followed by a low surrogate and vice ...


5

It's okay in the sense that the code will compile, but it's not particularly readable. For the sake of writing code that's easy to maintain, I'd recommend refactoring this into a separate method. It should look a bit like this: IOrderProcessor GetOrderProcessor(bool isInsideOrder) { if (isInsideOrder) { return DependencyInjector.Inject() ...


4

Aren't all "truly asynchronous" methods just blocking operations on some other thread if you dig deep enough? No. Truly asynchronous operations don't need a thread throughout the entire operation and using one limits scalability and hurts performance. While most truly asynchronous operations are I/O ones, that can get too overly complicated to ...


4

TL;DR: Event listeners do not actually have to actively listen; they get called back by the event-triggering party. See the Observer pattern. Just like properties, which are actually not much more than a group of methods and some syntactic sugar added, .NET events are also not much more than something else (multi-cast delegates) and some syntactic ...


3

It is a very broad topic, I can only reasonably cover the basics. The mechanisms are not specific to .NET, they apply to any program that runs on Windows. There are two basic ways that the operating system or another program can trigger an event. The first one is as you assume, the underlying mechanism for a button's Click event as well as almost all of ...


3

Well, the generic type provided to Nullable<T> doesn't need to implement IComparable itself. You have provided this condition yourself: T : IComparable, but that is not necessarily true for the T in Nullable<T>. I will agree that Nullable<T> is often used on primitive types that do implement IComparable but you could use it on structs, and ...


3

This is a comment from the source code: // Warning, don't put System.Runtime.Serialization.On*Serializ*Attribute // on this class without first fixing ObjectClone::InvokeVtsCallbacks // Also, because we have special type system support that says a a boxed Nullable<T> // can be used where a boxed<T> is use, Nullable<T> can not implement any ...


3

A good way to distribute WPF applications, is ClickOnce You can place your application on a server, users can click on the link to install it. If you like, you can provide settings to automatically check for updates. The application can be made to run in an offline mode, and will make an entry under the Start button as well as in Control Panel to allow ...


3

The only way to delete files currently held open by other applications is to have those applications release the lock on the file (usually by closing the file) or by terminating the application itself. Obviously, forcing an external application to terminate in order to delete a file that the app is currently holding open can often be a recipe for disaster!


3

Try this: Public Property Name As String ref https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd293589.aspx


3

I tried your code in LINQ-toSQL (previously called DLINQ), but the assert will never pass. The obvious cause is that the context doesn't even know about the new objects, so it can't possibly associate them. However, even if you insert the objects into the context c.People will not be populated var p = new Person() { Name = "Tom" }; var c = new Clan() { Name ...


2

I've discovered what caused this. There was a second FileSystemWatcher - on a sub directory of the first - which didn't allow renaming the first. (I'm still surprised, though. A FileSystemWatcher should be "invisible".)


2

The setup.exe would have to surface the exit code. FWIW, Windows Installer XML (WiX) has a bootstrapper (Burn) that you can customize (implementing a bootstrapper application layer) and do anything you want to do.


2

you can try as below return (from t1 in db.Employee where ( empid == t1.EmplyeeId && date1 >= t1.LeaveStart && date2 <= t1.LeaveEnd)) you can try as below,detailed answer int cntleaves = (from values in dbcontext.User_master where values.iUser_id == Userid && ...


2

The code that sends data to the client must regulate up the data that is sending on the socket. If you have multiple threads all using the same connection use a lock on the socket stream and keep the lock till the message has been completely sent, this will keep other threads from causing intermixed messages. The other way to do it is have a dedicated ...


2

Functions, whether T-SQL or SQLCLR, cannot modify state of the server. There is a whole list of things that cannot be done, such as any SET commands, calling NEWID(), etc. Check out the MSDN page for Create User-defined Functions (Database Engine) for the list of "Limitations and Restrictions". The only difference for SQLCLR functions is that they can ...


2

Aren't all "truly asynchronous" methods just blocking operations on some other thread if you dig deep enough? On the contrary. Truely asynchronous methods are async all the way down to the OS level. These types of methods by default dont block even at the device driver level, using IRP (IO request packet) and DPC. See How does running several tasks ...


2

You can't use controllers like you do. Controllers are end-points in MVC application. If you need to execute an operation from 2 different end-points, wrap that code in a service class and call that code from both of your controllers. Don't ever do var controller = new AcctountController() - this will give you not-initialised object that will not operate ...


2

I don't think that there's any way to call DeleteObject other than using p/invoke. So, if you want to avoid this undesired trip into unmanaged code then you should avoid calling GetHbitmap in the first place. You can do that readily enough. You want to make a BitmapSource. Do that with a call to BitmapSource.Create.


2

There is also a windows CMD command called convert. Make sure that ImageMagick is infact accessable to your application through environment variable PATH or maybe directly specifying your ImageMagick/convert executable path in your batchfile. so in short i suspect your application is calling CMD convert (converting filesystem) instead of ImageMagick/convert ...


2

Let me boil down your question to its essentials: Is there a way, using the TestScheduler, to execute a reactive pipeline and wait for its completion even when it contains asynchronous calls? I should warn you up front, there is no quick and easy answer here, no convenient "trick" that can be deployed. Asynchronous Calls and Schedulers To answer this ...


2

I realize this question is old and already marked as answered, but I was surprised that nobody suggested manually iterating over the enumerator: var enumerator = list.GetEnumerator(); if (enumerator.MoveNext()) { // Run your list.Any() logic here ... do { var item = enumerator.Current; // Run your foreach (var item in list) ...


1

The other methods are close to what was asked, but they don't return the string value. But this does: Dim methodName$ = System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name



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