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8

According to the MSDN: The benefits of code contracts include the following: Improved testing: Code contracts provide static contract verification, runtime checking, and documentation generation. Automatic testing tools: You can use code contracts to generate more meaningful unit tests by filtering out meaningless test arguments that do not ...


6

Your lecturer is incorrect. foreach(var type in typeof(Uri).Assembly.GetTypes()) { if (type.IsAbstract) continue; if (!Attribute.IsDefined(type, typeof(SerializableAttribute))) continue; if (!typeof(MarshalByRefObject).IsAssignableFrom(type)) continue; Console.WriteLine(type.FullName); } shows (and note that I'm only looking at a single ...


4

That is the syntax for specifying the type parameter for an open generic type. You can read more about generics here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/512aeb7t.aspx If you are new to C#, it will seem complicated at first, but a lot of the language makes use of this feature so it will be time very well spent learning it. With the general ...


4

As always, whether or not a test like that is valuable depends on your motivation for testing. Is this piece of code mission-critical? What is the cost if that code fails? How easily can you address errors, should they occur? The higher the cost of failure, the more important it is to test a piece of code. The GetModules method does at least four ...


3

Since you only want the form to retain its state while the application is running, the solution is very simple: never close the form, just hide it. When you're ready to display it again, show it. It will re-appear on the screen, everything exactly as it was left. (Unless, of course, you loop through the controls and reset their properties.) In the simplest ...


3

Yes, reserving memory can trigger OutOfMemoryException. Try allocating a couple of very large byte arrays. The memory for these will not be committed until you write to the content of the arrays. However, you can easily trigger OOM just by allocating these arrays. I don't know the implementation details, but since VirtualAlloc will fail if it cannot honor a ...


3

There are many options. The main issue is that you need to push the work into a separate thread, but not access your controls from that thread. The most common mechanisms to do this would be to use: BackgroundWorker Using Task / Task<T> Creating threads manually


3

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.addseconds.aspx DateTime.AddSeconds() per the documentation rounds to the nearest millisecond (10,000 ticks). You could do this with straight math, converting everything to ticks yourself.


3

I know this is not what you're asking, but instead of directly attempting to support F# from code written in C# (as I get the impression that you're trying to do), it would be more idiomatic to provide a small adapter module to make functional composition easier from F#. There are many examples of this, such as FSharp.Reactive, which provides functions to ...


2

Enumerable.ToArray() doesn't "wrap" the enumerable in an array: it iterates over the enumerable, creating an array. It's pretty much the equivalent of this: public static T[] ToArray<T>( this IEnumerable<T> source ) { List<T> list = new List<T>() ; foreach( T item in source ) { list.Add(item) ; } T[] value = ...


2

If you are sure that tableLayoutPanel1 exists and is not null, then change your code to this and see what happens: var control = gameBorder.FormInstance.tableLayoutPanel1.GetControlFromPosition (xloc, yloc); if (control == null) throw new NullReferenceException( "No control at those coordinates"); control.BackgroundImage = ...


2

If you just want to get the .jpg part of http://example.com/file.jpg then just use Path.GetExtension as heringer suggests. // The following evaluates to ".jpg" Path.GetExtension("http://example.com/file.jpg") If the download link is something like http://example.com/this_url_will_download_a_file then the filename will be contained as part of the ...


2

OutOfMemoryException occurs if the system cannot allocate more virtual memory for your application. Reserved memory is virtual memory and therefore accounts to that limit. You can try that in C++ most easily: while(::VirtualAlloc(NULL, 65536, MEM_RESERVE, PAGE_READWRITE) != NULL ); std::cout << "All memory reserved. Now check with tools." << ...


2

post the screenshots on another server and post the link to that picture (edit your own post), or just name the name of the application so we can see it for ourselves creating a wonderful GUI is a skill by itself and doesn't always have to with the right coding but is more a creative aspect one thing you mention though is changing the mouse cursor. this ...


2

You can specify an affinity mask for processes and threads. This allows you to prevent the scheduler using specific processors. So you could set the thread affinity mask for one thread to a single processor, and set the thread affinity mask for all other threads to be all processors other than the reserved processor. Since .net insulates you from directly ...


2

Apart from syntactic sugar, Code Contracts is Microsoft's tool for for "Design by Contract" paradigm. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_by_contract It basically a different a way of thinking when you design your classes and operations. From experience, DbC works very well with Test Driven Development, with you basically defining contracts and writing ...


2

<Button ToolTipService.ToolTip="ToolTip based on the mouse." ToolTipService.Placement="Mouse"/> If you need to display any FrameworkElements (and not just text) you can set the tooltip like this: <Button> <ToolTipService.ToolTip> <Border Background="Pink"> <StackPanel> <Image ...


2

I misread the question originally. This is a new answer This is what you want (if working index-based is an option). Explanation is below string[] myArray = GetArray(); for (int i = 0; i < myArray.Length - 1; i++) { var element1 = myArray[i]; for(int j = i + 1; j <= myArray.Length; j++) { var element2 = myArray[j]; } } ...


2

There is no built-in method to do this in C#. Since HashSet<T> is not indexed *, you cannot do it with two loops either. If this is a one-time deal, the simplest solution is to make two nested loops on the results of ToList() or ToArray(), like this: var items = hashSet.ToList(); for (var i = 0 ; i != items.Count ; i++) { var a = items[i]; ...


1

You shouldn't need to check for disposal of an object. You should ideally wrap it in a Using block like this: Using obj As New foo 'use your object End Using Next time you use it wrap the code in another Using block. I think your issue is not creating a New object at the start of your Using block. You probably want this: Using dbLocal As New ...


1

Wouldn't just creating a Func<,> be enough? let doSomethingWithFunc (f : System.Func<_,_>) = 42 let doSomethingWithFSharpFunc (f : 'a -> 'b) = System.Func<_,_>(f) |> doSomethingWithFunc (fun x -> 42) |> doSomethingWithFSharpFunc


1

With a slight rephrase, the rules you mentioned become easier to understand. The following ruleset is equivalent: Any page number that is either the first, second, second before current, first before current, current, first after current, second after current, second to last, or last page should be displayed. ...


1

You have a compile time reference to Fo1 method, so you just call it. What if you don't know the method in compile time? How'll you call it? That's why Delegates are useful. Can you imagine "Linq" without Delegates(or callback as you said). Without delegates linq is nothing. How .Net framework can call your method(defined in your own assembly).? Well, ...


1

This a to a degree a matter of taste. You can chose to show and hide controls one by one in a method or you can group them in a UserControl which you then show or hide in one command. I would base my decision one way or the other by these questions: Are there controls, that will always be visible and how is the layout for these? How many controls are ...


1

Why are you setting your MySuperDuper.globalChange to false on the click? It would seem, by doing this, the only way you can set it to true again would be to change the dropdown - which sets it to true. Have you tried calling the following instead: <asp:Button ID="btnSave" runat="server" OnClick="Save_Click" Text="Save" CssClass="button" ...


1

asp.net/mvc is the future! But you can also use the old WebForms. With ASP.NET MVC you have something strong called Web API that you can combine with angularJS and EntityFramework. Please stay up to date!


1

If your background is .NET then definitely go with ASP.NET MVC. In the last few years Microsoft has done a good job aligning itself with some of the open source world like jquery while improving their proprietary libraries. I've done quiet a bit of ASP.NET but recently also added PHP to my bag of tricks while administering a Magento eCommerce install and ...


1

Declare a char variable, store the value at the last index of the string. Then, starting from the second last index, move each character to it's adjacent position. Go on till you hit the beginning. In the end, just place the value in the character declared before into the first index. I won't give you the code, try it yourself!


1

The method repo.Index.Stage(filePath) performs a diff between the working directory and the index in order to detect if the passed filePath is supposed to be added to or removed from the index. When no change is detected, the index isn't modified. However, the way the diffing algorithm is actually implemented in libgit2 may not notice a content change if ...


1

I assume this could be improved some how. VB.NET version: Public MustInherit Class Degrees Public Property val As Decimal End Class Public Class DegFahrenheit Inherits Degrees Public Sub New(ByVal deg As Decimal) Me.val = deg End Sub Public Sub New(ByVal degCel As DegCelsius) Me.val = degCel.val * 9 / 5 + 32 End Sub Public Shared ...



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