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9

You are not at all using any algorithmic strength of the dictionary. Ideally, you'd use a tree structure so that you can perform prefix lookups. On the other hand you are within 3.7x of your performance goal. I think you can reach that by just optimizing the constant factor in your algorithm. Don't use LINQ in perf-critical code. Manually loop over all ...


8

First of all, DateTime doesn't have any implicit format. Strings have. Sounds like you just need to parse your string and format it with DateTime.ToString() method like; string s = "30/09/2014"; DateTime dt; if(DateTime.TryParseExact(s, "dd/MM/yyyy", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, out dt)) { ...


7

virtual is for single dispatch. If you need double dispatch, you could do this in C#: var objs = new object[] { new Class1(), new Class2() }; foreach (var item in objs) { Method((dynamic)item); } This will make the compiler interpret the call to your method in a very different way. It will emit a so-called call site which will determine at runtime ...


6

Use XElement.XAttribute(string) method to get a particular attribute and then you can cast it to string or use .Value property to get it's value: var list = xdoc.Descendants("Categories") .SelectMany(p => p.Elements("name")) .Select(e => (string)e.Attribute("text")) .ToList();


6

You can get it by Hovering on particular var keyword. For example see in below image the tooltip shows the details.


6

Because of the next sentence: Passing an invalid path to Exists returns false Which normally always generates an exception. Just not in the case of File.Exists(): bool miracle = File.Exists(":::"); So be careful, the file might actually exist but you simply might have fumbled the string. You can't tell, there is no exception that warns you ...


5

What if the path is syntactically incorrect? Exists() would return false implying that you now could create now that file, which is not true.


4

Why double dispatch via "dynamic overload" based on argument type isn't natively supported by C#? It is, via dynamic typing: static void Main(string[] args) { var objs = new object[] { new Class1(), new Class2() }; // Note the change of type for item to "dynamic" foreach (dynamic item in objs) { Method(item); } } ...


3

I think the best way would be to use a Trie data structure instead of a dictionary. A Trie data structure saves all the words in a tree structure. A node can represent all the words that start with the same letters. So if you look for your search word tempInputWord in a Trie you will get a node that represents all the words starting with tempInputWord and ...


3

After saving the Image, You need to Dispose it. Otherwise you push all the responsibility to GC. GC can sometimes save you, sometimes not. Given that Image size is equal to screen size, which means that memory taken by the image will also be huge. You ought to Dispose it as soon as you don't need it. public static void screenshots(string filename) { ...


3

You can't do this easily. You could mark the method as obsolete, but of course that requires access to the external library source code, at which point you could also just remove the methods. The next best thing I can come up with is to build a facade around the library object: public class LibraryFacade { //All the library methods as pass-through ...


3

Just use DateTime.Parse() or if you want to do a safe parse attempt DateTime.TryParse() DateTime dt1, dt2; dt1 = DateTime.Parse("12/13/2012 6:30:00 PM"); dt2 = DateTime.Parse("3/29/2013"); OR DateTime.TryParse("12/13/2012 6:30:00 PM", out dt1); DateTime.TryParse("3/29/2013", out dt2); You only have to use DateTime.ParseExact() or provide the format if ...


3

.If(t => t.Name.EndsWith("Adapter")) However, putting the how aside, it might be a good idea to separate the types into their own namespace, for architectural clarity. The sideeffect being, you wouldn't need the extra filter predicate.


3

If you want to show multiple file types at the same time, you should include them in a single filter: dialog.Filter = "Plain text files (*.csv;*.txt)|*.csv;*.txt"; Otherwise the user will have to select the type of file in the bottom Combobox of the dialog. Msdn has some useful examples of this.


3

The problem is that EF is trying to turn your Where conditions into SQL WHERE clauses, and doesn't know what to do with the reflection calls. A few options: Use the propertyInfo to generate an Expression that EF can translate to SQL Use Dynamic Linq


3

Being thread safe does not always require any synchronisation. Eg. public static int One { get { return 1; } } is thread safe without any special coding. Remember the .NET coding guidelines: static members should be thread safe (ie. unless documented otherwise), so this is the default position. But this guideline says nothing about any steps ...


3

Here's a Get that is not thread safe: private string whyWouldYouDoThis; public string NotThreadSafe { get { whyWouldYouDoThis = "Foo"; whyWouldYouDoThis += "Bar"; return whyWouldYouDoThis; } } Thankfully the optimizer would probably see this and think "what..." and fix this for you, but as is, one thread could build ...


3

Yes, it will release the native GDI+ image. But it's still better to dispose it manually if you can, because there is no telling when the GC will collect and finalize the object. And if you somehow kept a reference to the Bitmap, the GC won't collect it at all, so the native image won't be released...


3

While I completely agree with paqogomez, in that you should just use LINQ to do the query, the .SqlQuery has the ability to take a parameter array. You could change your statement to look like this: var sqlQuery = new StringBuilder(); sqlQuery.Append("SELECT DISTINCT a.city AS City, a.zip AS Zip "); sqlQuery.Append("FROM zip_city AS a "); ...


2

Like this: var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof (MyModel)); var mapProperty = Expression.Property(parameter, "Map"); var myProperty1 = Expression.Property(mapProperty, "MyProperty1"); var exp = Expression.Lambda<Func<MyModel, string>>(myProperty1, parameter);


2

If the purpose of your code is to traverse the directory structure using some sort of parallelism then I would suggest not using TPL Dataflow and use Microsoft's Reactive Framework instead. I think it becomes much simpler. Here's how I would do it. First define a recursive function to build the list of directories: Func<DirectoryInfo, ...


2

According to your edits, it should be something like this: return xdoc .Descendants("Categories") .SelectMany(_ => _.Elements("name")) .Select(_ => new Check(_.Value)) .ToList(); Note, that getxml shouldn't be an instance method of Check class. It should be at least static factory method.


2

Hover your mouse over the var keyword, it will show it in a tootlip.


2

You can change the size from here public static void screenshots(string filename) { //Create a new bitmap. var bmpScreenshot = new Bitmap( (Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Width - 100), (Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Height - 100), PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb ...


2

Here is a helpful article according to this issue. Quoting: If the DataAdapter executes an update command and detects that the number of affected rows is 0, it throws a DBConcurrencyException . The entire update operation will be aborted, and no further rows in the DataSet will be examined. Usually, a DBConcurrencyException occurs for one of two ...


2

Do you actually need DataRow here? You could do it trivially in dapper: int Id = ... var object1 = conn.Query<ObjectType>("Select * from tblExample where Id = @Id", new { Id }).SingleOrDefault(); this will do all of the mapping for you, since the columns match, and will handle null correctly; after that, object1.Number, .Name and .Active will be ...


2

This adjustment should make it: var criterion = NHibernate.Criterion.Expression .Sql("({alias}.Id IN (SELECT Id FROM dbo.fGetSomeIds(?, ?))" + " AS MyCriteria", new object[] { "param1", "param2" }, new IType[] { NHibernateUtil.String, NHibernateUtil.String }); // query.Where(sqlCriterion); query.Where(criterion);


2

Indeed, you need to have a separate class for each state, usually deriving a base class to get the standard methods, properties, etc. The problem you face then is typically a code generation issue. You want to have a bunch of code, with as least as effort as possible. We generate a database model to c# code and we find XSLT useful for this. We have an XML ...


2

I'd personally approach this as follows: Have a webservice that reports the latest version Check the version (on startup?) and if there's a new one... Download a manifest listing all files/directories required by vNext, the url they can be downloaded from and some hash of the file (Sha1?) Compare the files and hashes you've downloaded to what's currently ...


2

The best practice is do what you can to recover from the exception, but if you can't do anything let the exception propagate up to the caller and let them deal with it. As how to make the library robust and easy to use, document as much as you possibly can for your library. You can use XML-Doc to include what exceptions get thrown right in the metadata for ...



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