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3

There are two papers that I know of which describe a sweep circle approach to compute a Voronoi diagram in 2D. The second one "Parallel computing 2D VD..." also shows benchmarking results of their implementation. Unfortunately no link to a source code is provided, if you are looking for something like this. A Sweepcircle Algorithm for Voronoi Diagrams ...


2

I get the feeling that, during development, you're trying to use the Inspector as a "button", and you want to run your routine SetBool(bool value) ONCE when that happens. Am I right? So, don't do that. At all. Do this: (1) click add Canvas (2) click add Button (3) on the button, make the text "Dev Button" (4) look at the inspector of the button. drag ...


2

How precise do you need the algorithm to be? If you can tolerate some imprecision (a small area around the point shapes would be selected too), you could do with a blur. It would go like this: 1) Blur the image with a small radius (equal to half of the maximum allowed distance between the points). 2) Each pixel that has color which is precisely equal to ...


2

You have a very simple concept error. OnTriggerEnter2D(Collider2D) is to get if the collider has entered other collider. In other words you can go through the object. you need to use this function instead: OnCollisionEnter2D(Collision2D coll) I suggest you to watch this Unity tutorial because it explains all this really good: ...


2

As the code shows, the transform is controlled by yourself while the continuous detection requires control of physics engine, so try to control the gameObject with physics engine instead give it a position modified by your own code.


1

To explain about OnClickListener, i'll show you an example. In my layout, suppose i have three buttons called btn1, btn2, btn3 findViewById(R.id.btn1).setOnClickListener( new View.OnClickListener() { @Override public void onClick(View v) { //Inform the user the button has been clicked Toast.makeText(this, "Button1 clicked.", ...


1

The core of the problem is here : arr = rotate(arr,center,rotation); You assign a rotation on an already rotated arr and don't take account of a delta time in your rotation function. Instead you rotate the (already rotated) arr by the total amount of time elapsed - which gives that acceleration/accumulation thing. Consider the same code with a delta time ...


1

An alternative to the Jefinthejam's answer (and I think a more widely used way to do it) would be to compute the dot product between the two velocity vectors and check its sign. If it's negative, then the objects are going away from each other and you can safely not respond to the collision. The good thing is, if you need to perform the test many times ...


1

I would add another ifcondition after if dist <= (2 * radius) to check if they are moving towards each other or away from each other by predicting the distance between them after the next move and comparing with the current distance. dist_next = sqrt( ((x(i)+velocity_x(i)) - (x(j)+velocity_x(j))^2 + ((y(i)+velocity_y(i)) - (y(j)+velocity_y(j)))^2 ); if ...


1

Basically you could use hierarchical clustering to find the clusters. Each point is its own cluster Find two cluster closest together and merge them Repeat until end condition is met Couple of specifics: In step 2 you could use many metrics to find the closest clusters. Mean-to-mean distance or minimum distance over all point pairs are probably best ...


1

log 0 is undefined. It's not a real number, because you can never get zero by raising anything to the power of anything else. You can never reach zero, you can only approach it using an infinitely large and negative power. 3. >>> math.log(0) Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> ValueError: math ...



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