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1

You can do this using a for loop. int row = 0; int value = 5; for(int i = 0; i < trenches[row].length(); i ++) { tenches[row][i] = value; } You could put this in a function and pass the row and value public void standardiseRow(int row, int value)


0

Think of your 2d array as an x and y coordinate system. You can have a double for loop that goes through your x multiple times, but goes through your y only one time. In this case, your outer loop would be y and your inner loop would be x. for (int y = 0; y < array.length; y++) { for (int x = 0; x < array.length; x++) { if (y == 0) { ...


0

Try this code: String[][] trenches = new String[10][10]; trenches[0] = StringUtils.repeat("X", 10).split(""); trenches[1] = StringUtils.repeat("0", 10).split("");


1

Just invert the comparison of B in the comparator: if (ret == 0) { ret = Integer.compare(o2[1] , o1[1]); }


0

As far as I can see, the second sorting criterion (the one for the first field) comes in the reverse order, so revert the comparison result (note the added - operator): if (0 == ret) { ret = -Integer.compare(o1[1], o2[1]); }


0

public void moveRight() { if (HeroX < 730) //i guess this is the border { if(HeroX >= 520 && HeroY >= 260) //this is the house at this position the hero should be already inside, so you have to rework this part { System.out.println("X = " + HeroX + " , Y = " + HeroY); } ...


0

you should ask if your hero + your hero movement speed in the condition if( (HeroX + herospeed ) >= 520 & HeroY >= 260 ) so you check he won't go throught the house before moving


0

The house is (i suppose) a rectangular or polygonal shape rather than a line, so why don't you simply use one of these classes to represent the house? //import java.awt.*; //change the type of house to Polygon, if Rectangle doesn't meet //your requirements Rectangle house = new Rectangle(/* insert coordinates here*/); Rectangle hero = new Rectangle(/* ...


0

In a comment you state that you really want to find the 50×50 subarray that has most ones. A naive implementation could be to iterate over the array and then over each subarray to find the maximum sum: void subarray(char array[500][500], int *x, int *y, int *pmax) { int i, j, k, l; int max = -1; for (i = 0; i < 450; i++) { for ...


0

To improve efficiency you can use parallel technique. You can use for it for example CUDA. Also it is a good idea to use specific neighbour algorithm and compute the most dense space.


1

This is just an alternative way to do it in addition to Morgan's answer, for the record. It will allow you to fill as you would from top to bottom, but it will render from the bottom to top: ctx.setTransform(1, 0, 0, -1, 0, height); // reverses the coordinate system's y-axis ctx.fillRect(0, 0, width, fillVal * height); // fill as you would top to ...


0

For the example code Tablero = array('b'[Boardsize, Boardsize]) TypeError: string indices must be integers Integer indices are not allowed. To get it working you can declare the DICT as specified below: Tablero = {} Tablero = array('b'[Boardsize, Boardsize]) TypeError: string indices must be integers Hope this works for you.


2

If i've understood your question, what you need to do is to start drawing the rectangle at a lower (that is, larger) y-value. More specifically at height - (fillVal * height) Here's your method with the adjustment ... // Draw the fill ctx.fillStyle = '#777'; var fillVal = Math.min(Math.max(val / max, 0), 1); if (direction === 'vertical') { ...


1

I don't understand your ordering needs but at the very least you should be using std::swap() instead of all your manual swaps, like: #include <algorithm> ... if (a[0][k] > a[0][k + 1]) std::swap(a[0][k], a[0][k + 1]); It will make your code much shorter, easier to read, and more importantly fix any mistakes in your manual swaps. It is far ...


1

"BoxCollider2D.center has been deprecated. Use BoxCollider2D.offset instead" Replace: topWall.center = new Vector2 (0f, mainCam.ScreenToWorldPoint (new Vector3 ( 0f, Screen.height, 0f)).y + 0.5f); With: topWall.offset = new Vector2 (0f, mainCam.ScreenToWorldPoint (new Vector3 ( 0f, Screen.height, 0f)).y + 0.5f); Of course do that change to BottomWall, ...


0

It works in 3D because RaycastHit.textureCoord requires a mesh collider. In the 2D case it is way simplee because you can calculate the position yourself as you know the sprite hit, the cursor position and size of the sprite.


0

You seem to be looking for scipy.ndimage.interpolation.rotate, or similar. If you specifically want 90, 180, or 270 degree rotations, which do not require interpolation, then numpy.rot90 is better.


0

In Unity, you can modify the position of any object using it's transform component and it's position property. For example, if you have GameObject someSprite, you can assign a new value to someSprite.transform.position every frame. Usually it is done in your Update method, or, if you're working with physics, in the FixedUpdate method.


1

Your code mixes up two concepts: texture ids (or, as they are called in the official OpenGL documentation, texture names), and texture units: A texture id is a unique id for each texture object, where a texture object owns the actual data, as well as sampling parameters. You can have a virtually unlimited number of texture objects, with the practical limit ...


0

To begin I'll point out some general things about OpenGL: Each texture is a large square image. Loading that image into the gpu's memory takes time, as in you can't actively swap images into gpu's texture memory and hope for a fast run time. Q1: The reason only the second image is showing is because of this line in your sprite class: ...


0

You're running this code for every tile: public void drawTile(Graphics g){ try { img = ImageIO.read(new File("src/model/tileTest.png")); } catch (IOException e) { e.printStackTrace(System.out); } g.drawImage(img, this.getXChord(), this.getYChord(), null); } That means you're rereading the image for every tile. For every ...


1

You are not putting anything in the matrix, which is why it prints 0. You can insert the converted value in your matrix as follows: int tempVal = inputFile.nextInt(); degreeMatrix[i][j] = converter(tempInDegrees); Note that method names should start with a lower case in Java.


1

The line of code you are missing is this: degreeMatrix[i][j] = tempVal; You have read the value from file into tempVal, which is fine, but you didn't store it in your matrix before you printed the value :)


0

I like PIXI.js as it is really easy to use, yet is really powerful. I made this Game with it in 48 hours for ludumdare (doesnt work in mozilla, which is a fault in my code not pixi's)


1

On windows, You can use ReadConsoleInput() to navigate with a keyboard in a windows console. This solution checks for collision using the statement if (maze[player.y][player.x-1]==0) . 0 means no wall, 1 means wall has been hit. Here's an example of the usage of ReadConsoleInput(). #include <stdio.h> #include <windows.h> #include ...


0

You are returning back in the else condition so what you are actually doing is skipping execution and returning from the function . I have corrected your code for you in the same format import java.util.Scanner; public class Schedule { public static void main(String[] args) { String [][]arr = new String[4][2]; ...


0

You are checking both match and mismatch each time through the loop. You do not need to check for a mismatch. If it gets to the end of the loop without finding a match, it must be invalid. Try this code change: for (int i = 0; i< 4 ; i++) { if (userInput.equalsIgnoreCase( arr[i][0])) { System.out.println("classes are on: " + arr[i][1]); ...


0

You never do anything more than the first iteration in the loop. The Invalid Course statement should be outside the for-loop and will only be called if all 4 course checks fail


0

Your code says: if strings match print message return if strings don't match print message return So you always return after looking at the first element. One way to get what you need is: for each string if (string matches) print "classes on" message return // If we get here we didn't match any string (because we ...


0

Check the offsets of parents of the game object. It's possible that the outtermost object isn't set to be at 0,0. Otherwise we're probably going to need to have more information to help you. Screenshots or code snippets or something.


1

Your loop should look like this: for(int ra = 0; ra < cols; ++ra) { if(getline(myfile, line2)) { vector<char> newRow(line2.begin(), line2.end()); _maze.push_back(newRow); } } I couldn't find the use for the second loop and rb variable. Since newRow is already an array, what's the point in adding it for each row?


1

You could define your mazes as 2D array of strings, stored as a global variable something like this: #define LEVEL_COUNT (2) const char* maps[LEVEL_COUNT][12] = { { "||||||||||||", "| | |", "| | |", "| |||| |", "| |", "| |", "|||||| |", "| | ...


0

The reason this is happening is that Input.GetMouseButtonDown returns true if the user presses the mouse button anywhere, not just on the GameObject that the script is attached to. If you are using Unity 4.6 or above, Sundar Bons' answer is the best way to do it. If not, you can use the OnGUI function: OnGUI() { if (GUI.Button(new Rect(10, 10, 150, ...


3

if you are using unity 3D 4.6 or above. just create some public function public void loadScene() { Application.LoadLevel("TestScene1"); } on click select the function you create. Steps to add selected function add that script has the loadscene function to a gameobject. click (+)button in On Click(Button) shown in above img. 3.drag and drop the ...


0

Have you checked your build settings (File>Build Settings...) to make sure that TestScene1 has been added to the "Scenes In Build" section (and that the box is checked)?


0

Here is an example iterating over a test 5x5 array and replacing any non-zero values with 0s. You can use the Arrays deepToString method to print the result. import java.util.Arrays; public class NDArray { public static void main(String[] args) { int[][] arr = { { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 }, { 1, 1, 2, 3, 4 }, { 2, 1, 2, 3, 4 ...


1

According to your codes, I can only assume that formationRightEdge should be less than BoundaryLeftEdge and formationLeftEdge should be greater than BoundaryLeftEdge unless you are doing transformation in reverse direction in world point. Try this - if (formationRightEdge < BoundaryRightEdge) { Direction = -1; } if (formationLeftEdge > ...


1

If you want to be able access the matrix like so matrix[i][j] I find it the most convinient to init it in a loop. var matrix = [], cols = 3; //init the grid matrix for ( var i = 0; i < cols; i++ ) { matrix[i] = []; } this will give you [ [], [], [] ] so matrix[0][0] matrix[1][0] return undefined and not the error "Uncaught ...


1

There certainly are many different options concerning the details of how this could be implemented. You did not tell exactly how you represent your "tiles" (regarding interfaces, for example). But here is one approach, maybe it already helps: The idea is to store the coordinates of the tiles as a list of Point objects. (Converting these points into 1D ...


1

You may want to read up on the Coordinate System of a Node Coordinate System The Node class defines a traditional computer graphics "local" coordinate system in which the x axis increases to the right and the y axis increases downwards. The concrete node classes for shapes provide variables for defining the geometry and location of the shape ...


1

Does it help? load("draw"); draw3d(vector([0, 0, 0], [100, 0, 0]), vector([0, 0, 0], [0, 100, 0]), vector([0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 100]));


1

To answer my own question: (x, y, z, vx, vy, vz) = self._display.View.ConvertWithProj(self.lastPos.x(), self.lastPos.y()) Gives the entire line of points that x and y can map to, with x, y, and z being one point, and vx, vy, and vz giving the parameterization of the line.


0

Lacking an OpenGL compiler I forgot a semicolon. So this "v_TexCoordinate = a_TexCoordinate" + should be this: "v_TexCoordinate = a_TexCoordinate;" + Alper Cinar was right with his answer, too.


1

Try below code, but you may need to customize for your use using UnityEngine; using System.Collections; public class Spawner : MonoBehaviour { public bool SpawnerEnabled; public GameObject Enemy; public float SpawnInterval; private Float timer; void Start () { SpawnerEnabled = true; StartCoroutine (SpawnEnemy ()); ...


1

myBoard->boardSpaces[0][0] is of type Mine, not int or char. If you want to assign an int: myBoard->boardSpaces[0][0].ajacentMines = 5; For a char: myBoard->boardSpaces[0][0].mineHere= '5'; A union is multiple interpretations of the same location in memory - but the interpretation to be used must be supplied by code.


0

private int CountDistinct2DPoints(double[][] data) { Dictionary<Tuple<double, double>, int> pointsMap = new Dictionary<Tuple<double, double>, int>(); for(int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++) { if (!pointsMap.ContainsKey(Tuple.Create(data[i][0], data[i][1]))) { ...


0

So the reason it doesn't work is because it reads the direction and then adds a bit more to it so it sort of over corrects. So the code should read: using UnityEngine; using System.Collections; public class MoveMissile : MonoBehaviour { // Use this for initialization public float speed = 0.5F; public Transform Shotspawn; void Start (){ // Sets the ...


1

Which version of Unity are you using? I would recommend to use the 4.6 UI system (so use unity 4.6 or above) and just change the position of the text via a script or even animate the "jump-in". You can find a nice tutorial about the new UI and animation with it etc here: http://www.raywenderlich.com/78675/unity-new-gui-part-1 I hope that helps :)


2

The performance characteristics always very very much depend on your actual data sets. You should almost never rely on what you think is going to be faster: profile profile profile. The C# Stopwatch class is great for this purpose. That being said, here are a few thoughts on your case: A Dictionary likely won't do 499 reference comparisons. Depending ...


0

Since the 1D FFT code are ready, you can construct the 2D FFT by Row-Column method, i.e., first perform the 1D FFT on each row then perform the 1D FFT on each column, or first perform the 1D FFT on each column then perform the 1D FFT on each row. This approach is based on the separable property of 2D FFT. Note that the 1D FFTs are in-place processing, that ...



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