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43

Your code was fine except for the Base 64 encoding bit (which you mentioned was a test), the reason the output may not have made sense is that you were displaying a raw byte array (doing toString() on a byte array returns its internal Java reference, not the String representation of the contents). Here's a version that's just a teeny bit cleaned up and which ...


27

RSA can only encrypt data blocks that are shorter than the key length so what you normally do is Generate a random key of the correct length required for AES (or similar). Encrypt your data using AES or similar using that key Encrypt the random key using your RSA key Then you publish both the outputs from 2 and 3 To decrypt Decrypt the AES key using ...


21

As mentioned in other answers asymmetric encryption is only designed for encrypting data smaller than it's key size. One option that I have implemented when needing to transfer large amounts of encrypted data between two systems is to have an RSA keypair whose public key is known to both the sender and the receiver then when data needs to be sent the ...


18

Usually, RSA is only used to transfer a symmetric key (at the start of the stream for example) and then the bulk data is encrypted with that key. Asymmetric encryption isn't efficient enough to transfer a lot of data.


16

A 3DES key has length 128 or 192 bits. Note that, internally, the algorithm will use only 112 (respectively 168) bits out of those 128 (respectively 192) bits; however, the key itself, as encoded into bytes, stored and exchanged, must have length 16 or 24 bytes. Trying to set a key which does not have one of those two lengths triggers an error, which you ...


14

For future searches regarding RSA bad length exceptions... You can calculate the max number of bytes which can be encrypted with a particular key size with the following: ((KeySize - 384) / 8) + 37 However, if the optimal asymmetric encryption padding (OAEP) parameter is true, the following can be used to calculate the max bytes: ((KeySize - 384) / 8) + ...


11

pyDes can be used for both, DES and 3DES. Sample usage: from pyDes import * data = "Please encrypt my data" k = des("DESCRYPT", CBC, "\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", pad=None, padmode=PAD_PKCS5) d = k.encrypt(data) print "Encrypted: %r" % d print "Decrypted: %r" % k.decrypt(d) assert k.decrypt(d, padmode=PAD_PKCS5) == data An alternative is the Chillkat Python ...


11

Regarding DUKPT , there are some explanations given on Wiki. If that doesn't suffice you, here goes some brief explanation. Quoting http://www.maravis.com/library/derived-unique-key-per-transaction-dukpt/ What is DUKPT? Derived Unique Key Per Transaction (DUKPT) is a key management scheme. It uses one time encryption keys that are derived from a ...


10

Both iOS and OS X have the CommonCrypto library, which provides implementations of AES, 3DES, and DES, among others. Writing your own crypto library is difficult, error prone, and likely to cause bugs. Besides which, if you write your own encryption library, then you have to declare it and go through a U.S. government approval process if you ever plan to put ...


9

Here is a solution using the javax.crypto library and the apache commons codec library for encoding and decoding in Base64: import java.security.spec.KeySpec; import javax.crypto.Cipher; import javax.crypto.SecretKey; import javax.crypto.SecretKeyFactory; import javax.crypto.spec.DESedeKeySpec; import org.apache.commons.codec.binary.Base64; public class ...


8

TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider defaults to using PKCS7-padding. This pads any message to the next multiple of the block-size. To avoid using padding, just set the Padding-property to PaddingMode.None new TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider { KeySize = keySizeInBits, Padding = PaddingMode.None };


7

The .NET implementations of RSA (and all public/private key algorithms) do not support large blocks of data - because that's not the aim of public/private key. Instead what you would do is generate a new symmetric key and use that to encrypt the data. Then you use public/private key to encrypt the symmetric key and exchange it with the other party securely. ...


7

Triple-DES is still in use today but is widely considered a legacy encryption algorithm. DES is inherently insecure, while Triple-DES has much better security characteristics but is still considered problematic. NIST is the government organization that standardizes on cryptographic algorithms. The most current symmetric-key encryption algorithm NIST ...


7

You're running into this problem because Triple DES's key size is 168 bits (21 bytes), but MD5 generates hashes that are only 16 bytes (128 bits) long. This means the key will have to extended to 168 bits so Triple DES can work. It turns out that this derivation from 128 bits to 168 bits works differently in C# than it does in PHP, so the key that's ...


6

Code follows, but first a few notes. A different initialization vector must be chosen for every message. Hard-coding the initialization vector does not make sense. The IV should be sent along with the cipher text to the message recipient (it's not secret). I used my own utility class for base-64 encoding. You can use sun.misc.BASE64Encoder and ...


6

OpenSSL is a very reputable, well tested open source security library. It's available for *nix and Windows. You can find it here Edit, can't find a simple example right now. The API documentation is pretty good though. There's a pre-compiled version for windows available for download from the openssl site. Most package managers will have a pre-packaged ...


6

So here is the trick: > openssl enc -a -e -salt -des3 -P -pass pass:abc123 salt=17685C0658F85BA4 key=1CB6E5A0AA4953EC2323CBA021EF008C9193F5F29990DE87 iv =9148EB5B2BF2E9B2 If I feed TripleDES algorithm the output is almost same as openssl output. Only difference is extra 16 bytes at the beginning of the openssl output. The first eight of these bytes is ...


6

Unless what you have is not fast enough, keep it. It's clear and succinct, and its performance is better than you think. We'll benchmark everything against array lookup, the fastest method I tested: ODD_PARITY = [ false, true, true, ... true, false, ] def odd_parity?(hex_string) ODD_PARITY[hex_string.to_i(16)] end Array lookup computes ...


6

DES is an old standard that is not secure anymore because of its short key length; 3DES is one way to get it safer (uses three times more key bits). But the new standard is AES, which you could try if you don't find (or don't like) any DES libraries out there that suits your needs. You could, for example, use OpenSSL or libgcrypt. But I wouldn't implement ...


6

This is the PHP equivalent of your Java code (I have copied the PKCS#5-padding from the comment 20-Sep-2006 07:56 of The mcrypt reference) function encryptText($plainText, $key) { $keyData = "\xA2\x15\x37\x08\xCA\x62\xC1\xD2" . "\xF7\xF1\x93\xDF\xD2\x15\x4F\x79\x06" . "\x67\x7A\x82\x94\x16\x32\x95"; $padded = pkcs5_pad($plainText, ...


6

I had hard times figuring it out myself and this post helped me to find the right answer for my case. When working with financial messaging as ISO-8583 the 3DES requirements are quite specific, so for my especial case the "DESede/CBC/PKCS5Padding" combinations wasn't solving the problem. After some comparative testing of my results against some 3DES ...


5

The TripleDES algorithm specifies an IV (Initialization Vector) which is used to ensure that repeated encryption of the same data with the same key produces different ciphertext. To decrypt successfully, the same IV must be used in the decryption process as was used during encryption. As you are not currently specifying the IV (TDESAlgorithm.IV) when ...


5

Your IV is different. In your C# code you are using bytes 1,2 etc. but in your objective-C you are using the byte value of characters '1', '2' (which are bytes 49, 50 etc).


5

First, let me quote the complete sourcecode you linked and of which you provided only 3 lines... require 'bundler/setup' require 'test/unit' require 'dukpt' class DUKPT::DecrypterTest < Test::Unit::TestCase def test_decrypt_track_data bdk = "0123456789ABCDEFFEDCBA9876543210" ksn = "FFFF9876543210E00008" ciphertext = ...


4

In DES, some bits of the key are parity bits, and don't actually affect the encryption/decryption.


4

AES keys are 128, 192 or 256 bits, 192 is rarely seen. Triple DSE is usually 112 bits but can be 168 bits. Notice that this is specified in bits. Triple DES expects each byte to have a parity bit and thus 7 data bits. Usually Triple DES is used in a compatibility mode (compatible with Single DES) by performing single DES encode, decode and encode with ...


4

EDIT: @David Koontz replied to this post, and I had a chance to look 5 years into the past. I'm leaving my post intact below, but for anyone reading this now, avoid 3DES if you have the opportunity, and if not, get an expert to look at your specific system. There's no guarantee that a general answer will apply to your situation, in computer security ...


4

The key is in hex - if you look at the Java page you pasted you can see that easily by decoding the binary values for the key in the detailed output. >> des_cbc=OpenSSL::Cipher::Cipher.new("des-ede-cbc") => #<OpenSSL::Cipher::Cipher:0x10116ce28> >> des_cbc.encrypt => #<OpenSSL::Cipher::Cipher:0x10116ce28> >> ...


4

ISO 9797-1 MAC Algorithm 3 consists of using the first DES key to perform a CBC MAC and then only for the final block perform a full 3-DES operation. Try this: byte[] keybytes = ParseHex(key); byte[] key1 = new byte[8]; Array.Copy(keybytes, 0, key1, 0, 8); byte[] key2 = new byte[8]; Array.Copy(keybytes, 8, key2, 0, 8); DES des1 = DES.Create(); des1.Key = ...


4

iPhone comes out of the box with the CommonCrypto library. It has various support for encryption. See the Security Coding How-to from Apple.



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