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0

As Jester pointed out, if the vararg function is not using sse, then al must be zero. There is a bigger issue here: With the x86-64 calling convention, parameters are not passed on the stack as they are for 32bit, but instead passed through registers. Which registers all depend on what OS your program is written for. x86 calling conventions


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I am on Windows 7 32-Bit With Intel Pentium G2030 Core Duo with 3.00GHz with Virtual Box(Oracle) and it works!


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Found the solution to my problems: Data type sizes are different on 64 bit so my library was expecting 4 byte but longs are 8 bytes (4 bytes when compiled for 32 bit). Typecasting them to uint32_t did the trick. Normal int worked because thats 4 bytes by default.


1

The answer is that Ubuntu 64-bit offers I32LP64 compilation. You can detect this for yourself with the following code: $ cat t.c #include <stdio.h> #include <limits.h> int main(void) { printf("%zu %zu %zu\n", CHAR_BIT*sizeof(int), CHAR_BIT*sizeof(long), CHAR_BIT*sizeof(void*)); } $ gcc t.c && ./a.out 32 64 64


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This `-m32 imlib2-config --cflags` isn't correct and wouldn't have worked so that can't be the command you actually used there. That gcc line also doesn't create an object file, it creates a binary. You left of the -c argument to stop at compiling. That's likely the problem since you then go on to try to link a binary into another binary.


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More recently using apt-cyg, g++ 4.9.2 was installed but gcc-core 4.8.2 remained. Resolved by: apt-cyg remove gcc-g++ apt-cyg remove gcc-core apt-cyg install gcc-g++


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You forgot to initialize register long sum; to 0. Passing option -W to gcc would have told you. ...: In function 'in_checksum': ...: warning: 'sum' may be used uninitialized in this function


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If your projects don't have the x64 configuration, just add that configuration via the configuration manager. I don't remember if 2008 created the x64 configuration by default but I suspect not. I also seem to remember that you can just add the x64 configuration to the solution and it will prompt on whether or not to add it to all of the contained projects ...


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Right-click on the message symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64 and select Show Output (O). You will then see the full message that QtCreator has been hiding.


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You cannot mix 32 and 64 bit code in the same process. So option 1 is out but the other two are fine.


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This is a 32-bit issue OR a file location issue. What have you tried so far? What code do you use? I have created a very basic app and it runs just fine, though If I use the wrong path will throw your error. Also using the "prefer 32-bit" will. Since there's 2 most likely causes you need to do these: Check your project properties. Under "Build" there ...


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This problem existed because IIS Express looks at the bin directory for DLLs and this behavior cannot be overridden using the probing tag as claimed by the IIS documentation. I have reported this a bug to Microsoft. In other words, the output path for the bin in the project setting cannot be changed to anything other than bin for you to be able to ...


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Clumsy method: Run this batch file on the side (started from 64 bit explorer) : :lab0 TIMEOUT /T 1 >nul if exist oskstart.tmp goto lab2 goto lab0 :lab2 del oskstart.tmp osk goto lab0 Create file oskstart.tmp when you need the keyboard


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On iOS and Objective-C Exceptions are only to be used for un-recoverable programming errors, not for program execution control. In particular they do not handle catches accross stack frames inthe APIs.


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Two version of gcc was causing proble, check folder /usr/libexec/gcc/x86_64-pc-cygwin/ there would be two version of gcc. To solve remove one.


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Strangely these do also have the 32 suffix... whatever, probably for easier porting. To maintain source compatibility with programs that use functions like LoadLibrary or GetModuleHandle: Keep them working without having to alter the strings that go into these functions. If you look at the errors, it tells you it can't find the libraries ….lib. Note ...


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I'm not totally sure, but simulator has i386 architecture and armv7/armv7s is validate only for device. So you need read device to test it.


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ctypes will do a lot of the type coercion for you. For instance, given the function strchr defined in string.h const char * strchr ( const char * str, int character ); You can provide the argument types and return type of the function and not have to bother doing any of the type coercion yourself -- the ctypes module will handle this for you. The only ...


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here's a step by step tutorial to doing this. It sounds to me like you're having trouble at step 5 http://ralabaloza.blogspot.co.uk/2015/02/updating-cocos2d-iphone-application-to.html Try removing the folders from the lib directory completely, and then adding them back in from the update zip file. That way Xcode should find them.


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Mode and operand size prefix. In 16 bit mode, 81 /2 will be adc rm16, imm16. In 32 or 64 bit mode, it will be adc rm32, imm32. Unless you add the operand size override, then they switch places. To make it adc rm64, imm32 (there is no adc rm64, imm64), it needs an REX.W prefix, REX.R is useless since there is no r operand, REX.B/X will just allow you to use ...


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Yes, it will. The only caveats to this are that you need 32 bit libraries to run the program, and 32 bit development packages to compile it. Most distros provide these and make it simple to install them as well.


1

I had the same issue, and fixed it by updating my credentials in the "Identity" setting, under IIS/Application Pools. My password had recently changed, but the "Identity" was still set to my old credentials.


2

#define htonll(x) ((1==htonl(1)) ? (x) : ((uint64_t)htonl((x) & 0xFFFFFFFF) << 32) | htonl((x) >> 32)) #define ntohll(x) ((1==ntohl(1)) ? (x) : ((uint64_t)ntohl((x) & 0xFFFFFFFF) << 32) | ntohl((x) >> 32)) The test (1==htonl(1)) simply determines (at runtime sadly) if the hardware architecture requres byte swapping. There ...


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See http://php.net/manual/ru/function.crc32.php#111699 for CRC64 implementation.


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You can use 32 bit registers and instructions in 64 bit mode, just like you can use 16 or 8 bit too. One thing to keep in mind is that 32 bit instructions will automatically zero the top 32 bits of the respective 64 bit registers, while 16 or 8 bit instructions don't: movabsq $0xffffffffffffffff, %rax movb $0, %al # rax = 0xffffffffffffff00 movw $0, %ax # ...


0

Be prepared for blazing speed with vectorized operations: using the SSE2 or AVX2 intrinsics, you can process 128 or 256 bits in a single go (_m128i _mm_and_si128, _mm256_and_si256 and similar). And the forthcoming AVX512 extensions will allow 512 bits at a time!


1

The number of clock cycles taken on a 64-bit operation is not guaranteed to be 1 even on a 64-bit machine, but obviously the processor doesn't know whether the 64-bit value stands for one 64-bit or eight 8-bit integers, so the bitwise operation itself will be as fast for both cases. This part of the code will also almost certainly perform much better for the ...


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No, it can't be disabled. MSI enforces its rule that a 32-bit package cannot write to 64-bit portions of the file system (and registry).


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If you use C functions, then your program is a C program, even if you write it in assembly. C functions rely on the C runtime. You must therefore provide a main function and link with the C library, which will set up the runtime, call main and shutdown the runtime. For this to work properly you need to link with your C compiler driver. The arguments that it ...


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The issue is that your warnings are treated as errors. If you want to change this, do this: Project -> Properties -> C/C++ -> General and make sure that Treat Warnings as Errors is set to No. If you want to go further and address the warning, you should post the line of code that produces the warning and then further help can be given.


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You probably don't need to build the Qt sources, because someone already has: http://tver-soft.org/qt64 http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtx64/ Download and install the binaries. Then make sure the kit is found and configured in Qt Creator or in Visual Studio. Hope that helps.


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For anyone still having this issue, you also may need to set the framework field on the test runner to match the one in your included project (The field just to the right of the one referenced by AlexM). In my case, I was writing a test suite for a Windows Phone 8 library, and NUnit was unable to correctly figure out the framework version that it should ...


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Microsoft have a c compiler package specifically for Python 2.7 now. I suggest you use that instead of the SDK and VS. The VS express edition doesn't have the 64-bit compiler, which is why you need the SDK, in theory. I tried installing the SDK but it didn't help. If you don't need the SDK or VS for anything else, uninstall them and use the compilers from ...


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You can do C library linking manually. use following command on your object file produced with NASM: ld -dynamic-linker /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 objectfile -lc Above command tested on 64bit linux so if you want to use it on windows you must change /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 into your dynamic linker library usually find on C:/cygwin/lib/.. if you are ...


1

I work on a project that has a lot of questionable practices (currently working toward cleaning them up). I ran into this error and went through everything I could imagine to ferret out where the problem was including clang sanitizers, a variety of valgrind tools, and a variety of other tricks. The problem: exit() was being called in one thread about the ...


0

You can try the following and let me know: inline int float2int( double d ) { union Cast { double d; long l; }; volatile Cast c; c.d = d + 6755399441055744.0; return c.l; } // Same thing but it's not always optimizer safe inline int float2int( double d ) { d += 6755399441055744.0; return ...


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My OS is Ubuntu 64-bit. Compiling your code produced the error: nasm print3.asm print3.asm:12: error: instruction not supported in 16-bit mode print3.asm:13: error: instruction not supported in 16-bit mode Exactly where the "pop rbx" is located. Adding "BITS 64" to the top of the asm file solved the problem: BITS 64 section .data msg: db ...


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Using compressed pointers via -XX:+UseCompressedOops (enabled by default on Java 6) This is not true for all version of Java 6. -XX:+UseCompressedOops is enabled by default starting with Java 6u25


3

Your project as well as all the included libraries or frameworks should include arm64 as supported architecture like below: Please note that you are missing arm64 in your Valid Architecture menu. Valid Architectures : Specify the architectures you want to build: amv7 and armv7s are for 32 bit devices. arm64 is for 64 bit devices You may also want to look ...


0

You cannot store primitive values (int, float etc.) in an NSDictionary (or other collection types). Try wrapping it into an NSNumber (which is done by the short-hand syntax @( )): [[UITabBarItem appearance] setTitleTextAttributes:[NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:@(2.0f), NSKernAttributeName, nil] forState:UIControlStateNormal]; And, by the way, ...


2

I should've thought about this before. The error is a warning promoted to an error through /W4. I managed to fix it by wrapping a warning disable around the include. #pragma warning(push) #pragma warning(disable : 4265) #include <boost/...> #pragma warning(pop)


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In C language, you may use functions without defining them. Let us have a look at an interesting example of a 64-bit error related to it: A nice 64-bit error in C.


2

I think that if you try this code you will get your answer: char s[10]; char *p1 = &s[0]; char *p2 = &s[1]; std::cout << p2 - p1;


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The type of result of subtracting two pointer is: std::ptrdiff_t. Unit for the difference of two pointer T* is number of T Elements.


7

You are correct, the value is being truncated to 32 bits. It's easiest to verify by looking at the two values in hex: 1422028920000 = 0x14B178754C0 394745024 = 0x178754C0 So clearly you're getting the least significant 32 bits. To figure out why: are you declaring function() properly with a prototype? If not, compiler will use the implicit return ...


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The 1st February only counts for new Apps. Existing Apps have until June. And I'm sorry I can't find the source anymore where I read that.


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Two useful resources to sign drivers Windows 7 Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8.1(kind of) summery: 1.Get a RSA certificate from(Digicert or Verisign or anywhere in your budget) or create a certificate yourself if you need to install it only in your computer 2.When you have a certificate you will also have a private key 3.To distribute the driver you ...


0

Without your code my best guess is you should read this for AMD64 ABI and see calling convention standard in x64 platform. I think this should work for you. As on that document says you must pass parameter as follow (please note that you must classified your arguments first with method describing in ABI standard) : If the class is MEMORY, pass the ...


0

The solution: Armv7 build failed due to missing link flags in the Oyala binding linkWith file. After fixing the flags (LinkerFlags="-lstdc++ -lz -lxml2 -lresolv") the Armv7 build was completed with no errors. It still doesn't explain why Armv7+Arm64 (the fat build) did not fail. It just skipped the Oyala build. This is probably a Xamarin bug.


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This looks like a bug in Xamarin.iOS, it's not including certain libraries in the fat (armv7+arm64) build, while those (problematic) libraries cause problems in the armv7-only build. That said, I believe the build problems will be solved by adding -gcc_flags -lxml to the additional mtouch arguments in the project's iOS Build options. In addition I ...



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