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Abstraction is hiding the skeleton from the human body. The skin does a great way of containing it. (See how abstract I'm being there? Pun intended. I digress...) If I have a water bottle, then I'm able to drink from it by opening the lid, twisting it until it pops off. bool lid_open = false; void open_water_bottle_by_twisting() { lid_open = true; } But ...


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Abstraction An abstraction denotes the essential characteristics of an object that distinguish it from all other kinds of objects and thus provide crisply defined conceptual boundaries, relative to the perspective of the viewer. Abstraction is one of the fundamental ways that we as humans cope with complexity. Hoare suggests that "abstraction arises from a ...


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If you have created this method simply to hide the details of the underlying implementation, then it is encapsulation. Your method is not abstract since it is a concrete implementation. You can only call it abstract when you define the signature in a interface or as an abstract method in a abstract class. From java Tutorial: An abstract method is a ...


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To a degree yes that is abstraction, anything using that doesn't need to know how it prints, just that it does. A better example would be using a repo. interface UserRepo { public User getUserByUsername(final String username); public User updateUser(final User user); } You then code against the interface. For example if using spring dependency ...


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You just need to change your declaration of the domains to List<List<? extends Domain>> domains = ...; ... to tell the complier that it is a list of lists of some subclass of Domain. A list of Domain objects should allow insertion of any Domain object whereas the list of Colors will only allow insertion of colors...


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For me Bridge is not really the most foremost DP in the GOF bible, since it is mostly a derivative of Strategy. As some other patterns that have not aged so well (factory method?) it implies more inheritance with abstract classes holding behavior than other patterns, hence is less generally applicable. It's mostly Strategy doing the big work, but a major ...


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This is the expected behavior since getName() method of class A has access to member variable of its own class that is "name" of class A. It is NOT because of name is static even if you make it non-static and you access it as shown in below code snippet it would return "None". Remember that only methods get overridden not member variables. So "name" of class ...


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A couple of things to note in your class : name and description are static variables in both A and B getName is a static method in A static variables are bound to the class and static methods can't be overridden


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The problem you are facing lies in the definition of the methods getName and getDescription: They are defined in class A as static members. This means that even when calling B.getName() the actual call is A.getName() and there the static member variable value of name is set to None. When thinking about inheritance you have be careful what you declare as ...


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You need to override the method getName(): public class B extends A { private static String name = "B"; private static String description = "This is B"; public B() {} @Override public static String getName() { return name; } public B(User user) { super(user); } }


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You called the getName method on the class B. B doesn't have a static method called getName, so it looks for it in the superclass, A, which does. Maybe you expect B's version of name to override A's? Variables don't get overridden. A is accessing the static variable name defined on A, that the method was originally called on B doesn't affect that. ...


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Welcome back to Java again. You are using static variable in class A and B. These variables are associated with class instead of the objects. If you change your method to get name from the User, it will work as you are expecting.


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Guidance to the programmer. The two code examples you give are only equivalent if used correctly. A class containing stub methods can be intantiated and used, but it silently fails to do what needs to be done. An abstract class will raise an error unless a child class is derived and all the abstract methods overridden.


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You cannot stop inheriting classes from calling this method - you have made it protected so your intent is for it to be accessible to classes that inherit from it, whether directly, or via another sub-class. If you want to keep the inheritance, the best you can do is to throw an error if the sub-class calls it in MyDerivedClass: public abstract class ...


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This is not quite possible. And it may be a sign that your object design might be in trouble, but that's not a question for SO. You can try a bit more underhanded approach, though: public abstract class MyBaseClass { protected abstract string MyConstantString { get; } protected void MyMethod() { //... } } public abstract class MyDerivedClass :...


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Then I would instead of inheritance use composition in the MyDerivedClass. So all derived classes from this class does not know the methods from MyBaseClass. The class MyBaseClass would i make package visible so it is not possible to use it. abstract class MyBaseClass { void MyMethod(string myVariable) { //... } } abstract class MyDerivedClass { ...


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As I googled and inspected other related questions, answers and comments carefully, the only way is to make an generic class with generic names for variables. But if you want to use the class purely as a data item, it may not be a solution because in case if you want to convert it into a JSON, the variable name will be affected.


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I came up with an interesting concept that would allow developer to create database-agnostic code, but unlike ORM will not sacrifice performance: simple to use (like ORM) db-agnostic: works with SQL, NoSQL, files etc always optimize queries if vendor allows (sub-select, map-reduce) The result is Agile Data - database access framework (see video for ...


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I have added a negative lookahead, that matches a dot . surrounded by two not-dot characters. /(?!(.*[^.])?\.([^.].*)?$)(?!.*\/{2})(?!.*\.{3})^[A-Za-z\/\.]*$/ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ (.*[^.])? -> some arbitrary characters and at least one not-dot \. -> the dot ([^.].*)?$ -> one not-dot and ...


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I don't know if I am going to give the best answer but I thought I should give it a try. Abstraction means, in simple language: Logical representation of data. Like Queue, Stack, etc. Detailed from wiki Abstract data type (ADT) is a mathematical model for data types where a data type is defined by its behavior (semantics) from the point of view of ...


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ABSTRACTION:"A view of a problem that extracts the essential information relevant to a particular purpose and ignores the remainder of the information."[IEEE, 1983] ENCAPSULATION: "Encapsulation or equivalently information hiding refers to the practice of including within an object everything it needs, and furthermore doing this in such a ...


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Variable with a private access modifier limits its visibility to that particular class. Despite the fact that your setter method is overridden to public, x is not accessible from another class(mySubClass). Overridden method is in mySubClass and x is not visible from mySubClass.


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From Javadocs :The private modifier specifies that the member can only be accessed in its own class. So no matter what, you can't access a private variable outside the IT'S class.


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You cannot set private fields of the superclass from the subclass. In this case make your x protected.


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You need to define your methods in the Person prototype, not in an instance of Person. That way they will be copied when you do Object.create(Person.prototype): /** * Shows how basic abstraction works with JavaScript */ //Define the person object with a first name, last name, and an age function Person(firstName, lastName, age) { //Make it so ...



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