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20

Are you using g++ or some other compiler? In g++ RTTI is enabled by default IIRC, and you can disable it with -fno-rtti. To test whether it is active or not use dynamic_cast or typeid UPDATE I believe that HPUX's aCC/aC++ also has RTTI on by default, and I am unaware of a way to disable it. Check your man pages.


19

gcc has it on by default. Check if typeid(foo).name() gives you something useful. #include <iostream> #include <typeinfo> int main() { std::cout << typeid(int).name() << std::endl; return 0; } Without RTTI you get something like: foo.cpp:6: error: cannot use typeid with -fno-rtti


8

Which version of aCC are you using? Older versions used a pre-standard STL implemenntation that put everything in the global namespace (i.e. didn't use the std namespace) You might also need to use the -AA option when compiling. This tells the compiler to use the newer 2.x version of HP's STL library. >aCC -AA temp.cpp And it should always be ...


6

All modern C++ compilers I know (GCC, Intel, MSVC, SunStudio, aCC) have RTTI enabled by default, so unless you have any suspects that it may be disabled for some reason you may safely assume that RTTI in on.


6

According to the docs there is no option to turn it off. The only two bits of standard C++ that can be selectively disabled are "scope of variables in for loops" (-Wc,ansi_for_scope,off) and Argument-Dependent Lookup of names (-Wc,-koenig_lookup,off). There's no option similar to -Wc,-RTTI,off


4

The extern "C" construct is a C++ specific thing, it can't be used in C. And the compiler treats your source file as a C source file since it has the extension .c. The most common thing to do is to use the preprocessor to conditionally add this for C++ compilations: #ifdef __cplusplus extern "C" { #endif /* Standard C prototypes */ #ifdef __cplusplus } ...


4

This is most likely a macro that enables the use of the header with old, pre-ANSI C compilers. The "old style" C function declarations didn't include parameter types. I suspect its definition looks somewhat like this #ifdef __STDC__ #define __(params) params #else #define __(params) () #endif I believe type-safe function prototypes is one of the first ...


3

snprintf() was introduced in C99, and is defined in <stdio.h>, so your compiler must support that version of the C standard. If it does not support C99 then use sprintf() instead.


2

Version 6 of the HPUX C compiler is C99-compliant but you may need switches to enable it. The 6.20 release notes stated that the next release should switch the default mode from C89 to C90, and you're running 6.26. It appears that it did happen in 6.25, which was the release following 6.20. You could force C99 mode by using cc -AC99 (or cc -Ae now that C99 ...


2

Your compiler supports the old C++ standard which has no <cstdint> (as C90 had no <stdint.h>). <cstdint> is new to C++11.


2

from the standard of C++ it should be called when the library was load, right? No. Dynamic initialisation of an object with static storage duration is guaranteed to happen before execution of any function defined in the same translation unit. If there are no such functions, or your program never calls them, then there's no guarantee that it will ever be ...


2

RTTI will be enabled or disabled when compiling your program via compiler options - it's not something enabled or disabled in the Unix environment globally. The easiest way to see if it's enabled by default for your compiler is to just try compiling some code using RTTI. Options to enable/disable RTTI will be compiler specific - what compiler are you ...


1

Try with: #include <iostream> Instead of: #include <iostream.h> iostream.h is an old style header in which all functions are exposed in global namespace. naturally in such a case, using namespace std may not work since std namespace is probably not exposed by iostream.h header (in this compiler). As explained above, try with # include ...


1

you create jnlp file dynamically... i.e. create a form and when user click on submit with correct information then create jnlp file and prompt for download.


1

Enabling and disabling RTTI must be a compiler specific setting. In order for the dynamic_cast<> operation, the typeid operator or exceptions to work in C++, RTTI must be enabled. If you can get the following code compiled, then you already have RTTI enabled (which most compilers including g++ do automatically): #include <iostream> #include ...


1

Here you are: +Z - Cause the compiler to generate position independent code (PIC) for use in building shared libraries. +DA2.0 - To generate code for PA-RISC 2.0 for 32 bit or narrow mode +DSmodel - Use the instruction scheduler tuned to the model specified +Warg1[,arg2,...,argn] - Selectively suppresses any specified warning messages,where ...



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