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Considering that you do not have the ability to change auth token lifetimes and are looking to hide the authorization refresh from users, it would seem only appropriate to go with your second option. Fortunately, timed asynchronous actions are easily implemented in Node.js. It seems best to have this to have this update service rely on either the timeout ...


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The way in which OAuth 2.0 tokens can be validated is not standardized. Work is underway to do that: https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-oauth-introspection-11 This means that your validation implementation is just not compatible with your identity server.


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Standard (https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6750) says you can use: Form-Encoded Body Parameter: Authorization: Bearer mytoken123 URI Query Parameter: access_token=mytoken123 So it's possible to pass many Bearer Token with URI, but doing this is discouraged (see section 5 in the standard).


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One way to get around this would be use to Angular's event system. Since you are dealing with services you would probably need to broadcast the event ($emit) and listen for it ($on) on $rootScope. For example, you can setup a listener for a 'tokenExpired' event that calls your token refresh service, which when successful fires a 'tokenRefreshed' event. ...


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It does. The generated token is signed with the machine key of the configuration (this depends on how you host your API). If you run multiple Windows Servers in a cluster this config should be the same for all servers in the cluster. With that you shouldn't have a problem. A good example for that scenario is running an application using ASP.NET Identity on ...



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