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The most secure way to do this is just as you described: Get an OAuth token from some third party service (Google, Facebook, whatever). Create a cookie using Express, and store that token in the cookie. Make sure you also set the secure and httpOnly cookie flags when you do this: this ensures the cookie CANNOT BE READ by client-side Javascript code, or ...


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this is a good question =) First off, I'm assuming that when you say you have a token, you actually have a JSON Web Token (JWT) -- is that correct? I'm going to assume so. JWTs cannot be modified once they are signed. So no, you cannot 'modify' an existing token and just 'add' scopes into it. What you can do, however, is create a NEW JWT object, and store ...


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The RFC6749 section 1.5 indicates that: Refresh tokens are issued to the client by the authorization server and are used to obtain [...] additional access tokens with identical or narrower scope As far as I understand, the access token A may be still valid when an access token B is issued with the refreh token.


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Google APIs use the OAuth 2.0 protocol for authentication and authorization. Google supports common OAuth 2.0 scenarios such as those for web server, installed, and client-side applications. To begin, obtain OAuth 2.0 client credentials from the Google Developers Console. Then your client application requests an access token from the Google ...


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I got it... faking user agent in headers... function getDeviations(token) { return new Promise((resolve, reject) => { request({ url: `https://www.deviantart.com/api/v1/oauth2/browse/newest? access_token=${token}`, headers: { 'User-Agent': 'curl/7.44.0' } }, (error, response, body) => { if (error || ...


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A very good example of HWIOAuthBundle implementation with FOSUserBundle https://gist.github.com/danvbe/4476697 EDIT HWIOAuthBundle is a bundle for OAuth which provides a great documentation for its configuration/usage. First, you have to set the firewall on which HWIOAuth will be used. It should be the same as your Then, you have to register your ...


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I'm the author of a node library that handles authentication in quite some depth, express-stormpath, so I'll chime in with some information here. First off, JWTs are typically NOT encrypted. While there is a way to encrypt JWTs (see: JWEs), this is not very common in practice for many reasons. Next up, any form of authentication (using JWTs or not), is ...


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According to the Docs: access-token This serves as the user's password for each request. A hashed version of this value is stored in the database for later comparison. This value should be changed on each request. And it seems to be a tokenization using BCrypt and changes each time for security. Further they do not allow you to lookup the user in ...


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It was removed to prevent potential security leaks of information that attackers might use. Let's say an attacker can get a copy of your Access Token by sniffing all of your network traffic. But the attacker only analyzes this information after your token has expired. If the attacker tries to make requests to your service with that token, and receives back ...


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This is a good question -- there is a lot of confusion around tokens and OAuth. First up, when you mention OAuth, you are likely referring to the OAuth2 standard. This is the latest version of the OAuth protocol, and is what most people are specifically talking about when they say 'OAuth'. The OAuth protocol supports several different types of ...


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One of the solution is to set user_session cookie. This can be fetched either from the web-browser (after one-off login) or by submitting user/password into GitHub login form, and get the right cookie. Then this can be exported as: export GITHUB_USER_SESSION=xyz Now, the following Bash script is straight forward: REPO="foo" AUTH_PAGE=$(wget -qO- ...



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