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54

As rdbound said, Boost has a "near STL" status. So if you don't need another library, stick to Boost. However, I use POCO because it has some advantages for my situation. The good things about POCO IMO: Better thread library, especially a Active Method implementation. I also like the fact that you can set the thread priority. More comprehensive network ...


14

I have used parts of POCO now and again and found it to be a very nice lib. I largely abandoned ACE a number of years ago but POCO contains some of the same patterns - Task, Reactor, etc. I have never had any problems with it so I have to assume it is stable. Some aspects that I like: it is a pretty well integrated OOP hierarchy so the components work ...


13

Many POCO users report using it alongside Boost, so it is obvious that there are incentives for people in both projects. Boost is a collection of high-quality libraries. But it is not a framework. As for ACE, I have used it in the past and did not like the design. Additionally, its support for ancient non-compliant compilers has shaped the code base in an ...


11

If you find out that Google Protocol Buffers are to heavy (I can agree with that because compiled library could take more than 1 MB), maybe you could try lite version of protobuf. Lite version is few times smaller. Support for lite version could be enabled in *.proto by inserting following line option optimize_for = LITE_RUNTIME; More about this could be ...


10

Is Struct's address is same as address of its first member? Yes, this is actually mandated by the C and C++ standards. From the C standard: 6.7.2.1-13. A pointer to a structure object, suitably converted, points to its initial member The size of your struct should be two bytes. You should not convert a pointer to it to char*, though: instead, you ...


7

I recently got a new job and work on a project that uses ACE and TAO. Well, what I can tell is, that ACE and TAO work and fully accomplish their tasks. But the overall organisation and design of the libraries are quite daunting... For example, the main part of ACE consists of hundreds of classes starting with "ACE_". It seems like they've ignored namespaces ...


6

I have used ACE for a very high performance data acquisition application with real time constraints. A single thread handles I/O from over thirty TCP/IC socket connections and a serial port. The code runs on both 32 and 64 bit Linux. A few of the many ACE classes I have used are the ACE_Reactor, ACE_Time_Value, ACE_Svc_Handler, ACE_Message_Queue, ...


6

ACE_Semaphore & ACE_THREAD & ACE_Condition The above are all part of boost::threads http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_52_0/doc/html/thread.html C++11 http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread ACE_OS Some common things are done in boost w.r.t. OS but it depends on what parts of this you are using. There is boost::system and ...


5

Boost.Asio should meet your requirements. The reactor queue can be serviced by multiple threads. Using asynchronous methods will enable your design of a fixed number of threads servicing all connections. The tutorials and examples are probably the best place to start if you are unfamiliar with the library.


5

This might not be the answer you're looking for, but I would strongly suggest that you don't artificially restrict yourself too much when it comes to career goals. Figure out how long you do expect your career as a programmer to continue and then ask yourself if you (a) can really see yourself doing network programming only for that amount of time and (b) if ...


5

I have never used ACE, but I used Boost and Poco. I really like the coding style of Poco. The packages are consistent and the source code is easy to read. They're not template crazy like boost. In my experience I spend hours reading how to use boost - serialization package, pointer map container etc- and little time reading how to use Poco stuff. I ...


5

The ACE socket libraries are solid. If you are trying to port a standard implementation of sockets you can't go wrong. The ACE code sticks to a rigid development paradigm. The higher level contructs are a little confusing to use. The rigid paradigm causes some anomolies with exception handling. There are or used to be situations where string value pairs ...


4

Boost enjoys a "near STL" status due to the number of people on the C++ standards committee who are also Boost developers. Poco and ACE do not enjoy that benefit, and from my anecdotal experience Boost is more widespread. However, POCO as a whole is more centered around network-type stuff. I stick to Boost so I can't help you there, but the plus for Boost ...


4

1) Why we need is async write? Is it useful for TCP/UDP connection too (can write to TCP/UDP socket take time)? Asynchronous write is needed for the very same reasons as asynchronous read. When using synchronous write operations, the calls block until all data has been transmitted. This is not desirable for a number of reasons. Primarily to achieve ...


4

"a number of standard C functions and symbols are not defined" strdup is not a standard C function. It is defined in POSIX, but not in C or C++. Quoting MSDN: These POSIX functions are deprecated beginning in Visual C++ 2005. Use the ISO C++ conformant _strdup, _wcsdup, _mbsdup instead. It appears to me that none of the symbols you ...


4

Which C++ cast is appropriate instead of the C-like cast? Static or reinterpret? You need reinterpret_cast to convert an object pointer (including void*) to a function pointer. Can I omit the typedef in the cast? If you have a pointer of the correct type available, you could specify the type of the pointer, rather than a type name: cBase * ...


3

For both blocking and non-blocking sockets you only need to call connect() once. When the socket is non-blocking and connect() returns EINPROGRESS it needs to wait till the socket becomes ready for write using select(). When select() reports that socket is ready for write it can be either that connect() succeeded or failed. To check whether a non-blocking ...


3

A little more information would help obtain a better answer: Are your worker threads waiting on other events prior to running? How do your threads communicate with one another? Will you always have the ability to terminate gracefully, or are you anticipating having to force terminate some threads? The other question you mentioned made a very good ...


3

Boost is great, I've only heard good things about POCO (but never used) but I don't like ACE and would avoid it in future. Although you will find fans of ACE you will also find many detractors which you don't tend to get with boost or poco (IME), to me that sends a clear signal that ACE is not the best tool (although it does what it says on the tin).


3

Out of those I've only ever really used ACE. ACE is a great framework for cross-platform enterprise networking applications. It's extremely versatile and scalable and comes with TAO and JAWS for quick, powerful development of ORB and/or Web based applications. Getting up to speed with it can be somewhat daunting, but there is a lot of literature on it, and ...


3

Is there a way to close the port? Yes. Close the socket, or set FD_CLOEXEC on the underlying file descriptor. Or ... wrap your call to the child process (...postgresql start) with something that will close fds higher than stderr: ACE_OS::system("perl -MPOSIX -e 'POSIX::close($_) for 3 .. sysconf(_SC_OPEN_MAX); exec @ARGV' /etc/init.d/postgresql ...


3

If you have a look at their subversion repository, it does not seem that ACE is undergoing much development nowadays, possibly just bug fixing or minor extensions. On the other hand, ACE is the foundations of other frameworks by the same group that indeed are more active. Anyway, the discussion forum shows relevant activity and constant interest in ACE. As ...


3

You're on the right track. It's smart to ask "why" especially with all the hype around asynchronous and event driven. There are applications other than the web. Consider message queues and financial transactions like high frequency trading. Basically any time that waiting costs money or loses an opportunity to serve a customer is a candidate for async. ...


2

To me it seems boost has the most traction for new C++ libraries and the fact that many of them got accepted into the upcoming C++ standard speaks for itself. I use ACE and Boost myself and the reasons I chose them are that they are mature (especially ACE) have a large strong user community which makes sure they will be maintained and enhanced and that I ...


2

If ACE doesn't provide a method to do it you have to figure out its type. Given that it is ACE, it is probably hidden behind 3 typedefs nested in 5 #defines. The header file OS_NS_Thread.h looks like as good a starting point as any.


2

ACE calls this "Thread Specific Storage". Check this out: ACE_TSS. That's about all I know about it, sorry can't be more help. The Wikipedia page for thread-local storage says there is a pthreads way to do this too.


2

If all you need is to load, unload, and call some functions in a shared library, you could use the ACE_DLL class instead. That's what ACE_Shared_Object ends up using under the covers.


2

The ACE networking library is available for iPhone.


2

TAO (The ACE ORB), an open-source implementation of a CORBA Object Request Broker.



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